John Di Bartolo

Senior Lecturer

John Di Bartolo

Research Interests: Type-II superconductors
Educational software
Mechanics of articulated figures

Boston College, 1991
Bachelor of Arts, Mathematics

Boston College, 1993
Master of Science, Physics

University of Virginia, 1997
Doctor of Philosophy, Physics


Journal Articles

 

 

 

Other Publications

 

 

 


2013 Distinguished Teacher Award

 


  1. WIRED Magazine, Almost Impossible video series (October, 2019). Why It's Almost Impossible to Do a Quintuple Cork in Tricking. Interviewed as Applied Physicist from NYU.
  2. Science Channel (June-August, 2018). Strange Evidence, Season 2. Interviewed as NYU Physicist.
  3. American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting, San Diego, CA (January, 2018). Using Computational Methods to Calculate the Magnus Force (poster).
  4. Washington Post (July, 2016). The Twisted Physics Behind the Incredible Sport of ‘Tricking’.
  5. American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting, New Orleans, LA (January, 2016). Physics Bites! – Lenses (poster).
  6. American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting, New Orleans, LA (January, 2016). Quantum Sandbox - A Playground for 1D and 2D Quantum Wavefunctions.
  7. NYU-Poly Research Expo, Brooklyn, NY (May, 2013). Teaching Physics with Sport Simulation Software.
  8. Teaching Technology Demo Fest, Brooklyn, NY (April, 2013). Student Response System: Problem Solving Approach/Peer Instruction.
  9. Cornelia Street Cafe (October, 2011). Angular Momentum of the Human Body. (“Entertaining Science” talk.)
  10. AAPT Meeting (July, 2010). Orientation Change of a Two-dimensional Articulated Figure of Zero Angular Momentum.
  11. LeMoyne College (October, 2006). Diving, Swinging, and Jumping: Physics of the Human Body.
  12. College of the Holy Cross (October, 2006). Angular Momentum of the Human Body. (One of the plenary talks in a “Physics of Sports” conference.)
  13. Wheaton College (April, 2005). Diving, Swinging, and Jumping: Physics of the Human Body.
  14. Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY (May, 2004). Angular Momentum and the Human Body. (Principal Scholars Talk.)