Physics and Mathematics, B.S. | NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Physics and Mathematics, B.S.

On Campus

Physics and Mathematics

Mathematics deals with abstraction, logic, and quantitative reasoning. Because it has applications to nearly every branch of science and engineering, it’s essential for mathematicians to think about how their work infiltrates other branches of learning. Advances in physics — for example, those in electromagnetism and thermodynamics — often resonate deeply with mathematics.

At the School of Engineering, the BS in Applied Physics and Mathematics program serves as a means to bridge these 2 disciplines. The dual major allows you to gain a foothold in separate but substantial fields. In addition to learning the fundamentals of physics and math, our students pursue a specialized course of study that a minor in either field just can’t match.

But we also want to make sure your skills transfer over to the real world. That’s why we provide internship opportunities at major financial, insurance, and technology firms in the New York area.

Students with experience in both mathematics and physics enjoy diverse and interesting careers. Our graduates have the freedom to explore such stimulating fields as chemistry, biology, medicine, and engineering. They’re also qualified for positions in software design, economics, aerospace engineering, law, and business.

Curriculum

You must complete 128 credits, as defined below, to graduate from the School of Engineering with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics & Physics.  Please note that the curriculum that follows applies to students who began classes in the fall of 2020 or later. If you entered the School of Engineering prior to that date, please consult the curriculum and typical course schedule for students entering spring 2020 or earlier.

The Department of Applied Physics also offers a Minor in Applied Physics and a Concentration and Minor in Nuclear Science and Engineering. A full list of the department's undergraduate offerings is also available.

The core of the program is 32 credits of required physics courses and 31 credits of required math courses. Students pursuing the dual major must also take an additional 8 credits of physics and math electives. 22 credits are reserved for STEM & free electives and independent study courses. The remaining credits are used to satisfy other school, university and state requirements. The curriculum is specified in detail below.


3 Credits Mechanics PH-UY1013
This course is the first of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Motion of particles and systems of particles. One-dimensional motion. Vectors and two-dimensional motions. Forces and acceleration. Conservation of energy and momentum. Rotations. The free and driven harmonic oscillator. Gravitation. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or an approved equivalent. Corequisites: MA-UY 1124 or approved equivalent, and EX-UY 1
3 Credits Electricity, Magnetism, & Fluids PH-UY2023
This is the second course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Fluids at rest and in motion. An introduction to electric and magnetic forces and fields. Electric charge density. Electric fields from simple charge distributions. Electric potential. Capacitance. Magnetic forces. Magnetic field from a current loop. Inductance. Magnetism in matter. Current and resistance. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or an approved equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I, and EX-UY 1
3 Credits Waves, Optics, & Thermodynamics PH-UY2033
This is the third course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Water, sound and electromagnetic waves. Reflection, scattering and absorption. Standing waves and spectra. Superposition, diffraction and beats. Geometrical optics. Introduction to thermodynamics; temperature, heat, and entropy. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Co-requisites: PH-UY 2131, and EX-UY 1.
4 Credits Analytical Mechanics PH-UY2104
The course covers statics by virtual work and potential energy methods. Stability of equilibrium. Particle dynamics, harmonic oscillator and planetary motion. Rigid body dynamics in two and three dimensions. Lagrangian mechanics. Dynamics of oscillating systems.
Prerequisite: PH-UY 2023; Co-requisite: MA-UY 2034
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory I PH-UY2121
PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I (0.5:1:0:1). An introductory level experimental course. Fundamental laboratory experiments in classical mechanics and electrostatics. Stresses basic experimental techniques, error analysis, and written presentation of experiment results. Experiments require progressively more detailed and sophisticated analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2023.
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory II PH-UY2131
PH 2131 General Physics Laboratory II (0.5:1:0:1). The second part of the introductory physics laboratory program. Fundamental laboratory experiments in E&M, waves, optics, and thermodynamics. Stresses experimental models and design, error and data analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Corequisite: PH-UY 2033
4 Credits Introduction to Modern and Solid State Physics PH-UY2344
Special theory of relativity, Michelson Morley experiment. Planck’s quantum hypothesis, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, Rutherford scattering, Bohr’s atom, DeBroglie wavelength, electron diffraction, wave function, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation. Application to: square well potential, one electron atom. Atomic nucleus, fission and fusion. Energy bands in a periodic lattice, Kronig Penney model, valence, conduction bands, impurity states, electron mobility. Semiconductor properties. Introduction to superconductivity; electron pairs, energy gap, Josephson effect.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2023; Co-requisite: PH-UY 2033 and MA-UY 2034.
2 Credits Junior Physics Laboratory PH-UY3002
An intermediate level laboratory course providing in depth exposure to a selection of classic physics experiments. Students' experimental skill set is expanded and data analysis and communication skills developed.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2131 and PH-UY 2033; Co-requisites: PH-UY 2344 and MA-UY 2224.
4 Credits Electricity and Magnetism PH-UY3234
The course covers properties of the electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic field in vacuum and in material media. Maxwell’s equations with applications to elementary problems.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2033 and MA-UY 2114.
4 Credits Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics PH-UY4124
The course covers fundamental laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, heat, internal energy and entropy. Topics include an introduction to statistical physics, and applications of Maxwell, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distributions.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2344, MA-UY 2114, and MA-UY 2224.
3 Credits Quantum Mechanics I PH-GY6673
Quantum mechanics with applications to atomic systems. The use of Schrodinger’s equations. Angular momentum and spin. Semi-classical theory of field-matter interaction.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 2122, PH-UY 3234 equivalents.


4 Credits Calculus I for Engineers MA-UY1024
This course covers: Library of Functions, functions of one variable. Limits, derivatives of functions defined by graphs, tables and formulas, differentiation rules for power, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, derivatives of trigonometric functions, the product and quotient rules, the chain rule, applications of the chain rule, maxima and minima, optimization. The definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and interpretations, theorems about definite integrals, anti-derivatives. MA-UY 1324 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1024 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1324 covers the same material as MA-UY 1024 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (with a grade of B or better). Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Calculus II for Engineers MA-UY1124
This course covers techniques of integration, introduction to ordinary differential equations, improper integrals, numerical methods of integration, applications of integration, sequences, series, power series, approximations of functions via Taylor polynomials, Taylor series, functions of two variables, graphs of functions of two variables, contour diagrams, linear functions, functions of three variables. MA-UY 1424 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1124 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1424 covers the same material as MA-UY 1124 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1022 (with a grade of B or better) or MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 (with a grade of B or better).
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
4 Credits Linear Algebra and Differential Equations MA-UY2034
MA-UY 2034 is an introduction to ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. The course develops the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that are widely used in modern engineering and science. Linear algebra is used as a tool for solving systems of linear equations as well as for understanding the structure of solutions to linear (systems) of differential equations. Topics covered include the fundamental concepts of linear algebra such as Gaussian elimination, matrix theory, linear transformations, vector spaces, subspaces, basis, eigenvectors, eigenvalues and the diagonalization of matrices, as well as the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that commonly appear in modern engineering and science.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3083 or MA-UY 4204.
4 Credits Calculus Iii: Multi-dimensional Calculus MA-UY2114
Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorems of Gauss and Stokes.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Anti-requisite: MA-UY 2514
4 Credits Data Analysis MA-UY2224
An introductory course to probability and statistics. It affords the student some acquaintance with both probability and statistics in a single term. Topics in Probability include mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; the Central Limit Theorem and the normal approximation. Topics in Statistics include sampling distributions of sample mean and sample variance; normal, t-, and Chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; testing of hypotheses; least squares regression model. Applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data are integrated into the course.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2233 or MA-UY 3012 or MA-UY 3022.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY1424, or MA-UY 1132
3 Credits Advanced Linear Algebra and Complex Variables MA-UY3113
This course provides a deeper understanding of topics introduced in MA-UY 2012 and MA-UY 2034 and continues the development of those topics, while also covering functions of a Complex Variable. Topics covered include: The Gram-Schmidt process, inner product spaces and applications, singular value decomposition, LU decomposition. Derivatives and Cauchy-Riemann equations, integrals and Cauchy integral theorem. Power and Laurent Series, residue theory.
Prerequisites: (MA-UY 2122 or MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514) AND (MA-UY 2012 or MA-UY 2034). Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 1533, MA-UY 3112 or MA-UY 4433.
4 Credits Applied Partial Differential Equations MA-UY4414
This course gives an overview of PDEs that occur commonly in the physical sciences with applications in heat flow, wave propagation, and fluid flow. Analytical as well as some numerical solution techniques will be covered, with a focus on applications rather than analysis.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 4204 or MA-UY 4214
4 Credits Numerical Analysis MA-UY4424
In numerical analysis one explores how mathematical problems can be analyzed and solved with a computer. As such, numerical analysis has very broad applications in mathematics, physics, engineering, finance, and the life sciences. This course gives an introduction to this subject for mathematics majors. Theory and practical examples using Matlab will be combined to study a range of topics ranging from simple root-finding procedures to differential equations and the finite element method.
Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in (MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514) and (MA-UY 3034 or MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3113)


1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
2 Credits Physics: the Genesis of Technology PH-UY1002
This course introduces contemporary topics in physics, along with readings and discussions of topics with technological implications.
Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.
4 Credits Writing the Essay: EXPOS-UA1
This foundational writing course is required for CAS, Stern, Nursing, Social Work, Steinhardt and Tandon incoming undergraduates. "Writing the Essay" provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative and logical thinking, and clear, persuasive writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, to use texts as evidence, to develop ideas, and to write exploratory and argumentative essays. Exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning are emphasized. In FALL 2020, sections 001, 002, 004, 005, 006, and 007 are reserved for CAS first-year students with a strong interest in science and/or prehealth who were placed in these sections as part of the virtual advising process (in spring, sections 1,2,4,6). They are not open to other students and there are no exceptions. Sections 008, 010, 011, 013 are reserved for students who have been selected for the “Goddard Residential Stream.” In Fall, the following sections are available to incoming undergraduates on the WSQ campus: 009, 014-019, 023-024, 026-028, 031-076, 078-124. In Fall, the following sections are available to incoming Tandon undergraduates on the Brooklyn campus 126-148, 150-169. In Fall, the following sections have been designated for “Go Local” students at Shanghai, and meet at China Standard Time as designated in Albert: sections 020, 021, 022, 025, 029, 077 (Tandon only). These sections are department controlled. Please check the notes to each section to understand the teaching mode: “Online” at the meeting pattern designated; “Blended” with all students meeting in person on campus one day and the other day, online, according to the designated meeting pattern; and “In Person”, all students meeting in a physical classroom twice weekly at the designated meeting pattern. Students who are not able to attend the session at the location or time specified must register for an on-line section that works with their time zone. For questions and access, please email "ewp@nyu.edu"
4 Credits The Advanced College Essay EXPOS-UA2
The course follows Writing the Essay (EW 1013) and provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, using written texts as evidence, developing ideas, and writing argumentative essays. It stresses analysis, argument, reflection, revision, and collaborative learning.
Prerequisite(s): EW 1013
4 Credits Introduction to Programming & Problem Solving CS-UY1114
This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors who have limited prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from various disciplines. ABET competencies: a,b,c, e, f, g, k
Corequisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1113

And either of these courses can be taken:

CM-UY1004 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
CM-UY1014 Please refer to the bulletin for more information


You are required to take 16 credits in the humanities and social sciences requiring EXPOS-UA 1 and EXPOS-UA 2 as prerequisites. To gain some breadth and depth of knowledge, it is required that you take courses in at least two disciplines and at least one course at an advanced level.


Select at least 8 credits from the lists of undergraduate math and physics elective courses. Graduate courses may be substituted with advisor’s approval.


22 credits are allocated for STEM & free electives and independent study courses.  8 credits are reserved for a 6 credit physics project plus a 2 credit senior physics seminar course or a 4 credit math project/thesis and an extra 4 credit math elective.  The remaining 14 credits are reserved for two 4 credit STEM electives and two 3 credit free electives. The program adviser must approve electives selected from other disciplines.


Sample Course Schedule

This typical course schedule provides guidance to students as to how they would normally be expected to complete the degree requirements.  Students should be sure to consult their advisor before selecting courses for a particular semester as prerequisites and course offering patterns are the primary considerations affecting registration. This sequence applies to students who begin classes in the fall of 2020 and onwards. If you entered the School of Engineering prior to that date, please review the curriculum and typical course schedule for students entering prior to fall 2020.


Fall Semester

Choose one:

CM-UY1004 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
CM-UY1014 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Take all:

2 Credits Physics: the Genesis of Technology PH-UY1002
This course introduces contemporary topics in physics, along with readings and discussions of topics with technological implications.
Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.
4 Credits Calculus I for Engineers MA-UY1024
This course covers: Library of Functions, functions of one variable. Limits, derivatives of functions defined by graphs, tables and formulas, differentiation rules for power, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, derivatives of trigonometric functions, the product and quotient rules, the chain rule, applications of the chain rule, maxima and minima, optimization. The definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and interpretations, theorems about definite integrals, anti-derivatives. MA-UY 1324 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1024 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1324 covers the same material as MA-UY 1024 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (with a grade of B or better). Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Writing the Essay: EXPOS-UA1
This foundational writing course is required for CAS, Stern, Nursing, Social Work, Steinhardt and Tandon incoming undergraduates. "Writing the Essay" provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative and logical thinking, and clear, persuasive writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, to use texts as evidence, to develop ideas, and to write exploratory and argumentative essays. Exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning are emphasized. In FALL 2020, sections 001, 002, 004, 005, 006, and 007 are reserved for CAS first-year students with a strong interest in science and/or prehealth who were placed in these sections as part of the virtual advising process (in spring, sections 1,2,4,6). They are not open to other students and there are no exceptions. Sections 008, 010, 011, 013 are reserved for students who have been selected for the “Goddard Residential Stream.” In Fall, the following sections are available to incoming undergraduates on the WSQ campus: 009, 014-019, 023-024, 026-028, 031-076, 078-124. In Fall, the following sections are available to incoming Tandon undergraduates on the Brooklyn campus 126-148, 150-169. In Fall, the following sections have been designated for “Go Local” students at Shanghai, and meet at China Standard Time as designated in Albert: sections 020, 021, 022, 025, 029, 077 (Tandon only). These sections are department controlled. Please check the notes to each section to understand the teaching mode: “Online” at the meeting pattern designated; “Blended” with all students meeting in person on campus one day and the other day, online, according to the designated meeting pattern; and “In Person”, all students meeting in a physical classroom twice weekly at the designated meeting pattern. Students who are not able to attend the session at the location or time specified must register for an on-line section that works with their time zone. For questions and access, please email "ewp@nyu.edu"
1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.

Spring Semester

3 Credits Mechanics PH-UY1013
This course is the first of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Motion of particles and systems of particles. One-dimensional motion. Vectors and two-dimensional motions. Forces and acceleration. Conservation of energy and momentum. Rotations. The free and driven harmonic oscillator. Gravitation. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or an approved equivalent. Corequisites: MA-UY 1124 or approved equivalent, and EX-UY 1
4 Credits Calculus II for Engineers MA-UY1124
This course covers techniques of integration, introduction to ordinary differential equations, improper integrals, numerical methods of integration, applications of integration, sequences, series, power series, approximations of functions via Taylor polynomials, Taylor series, functions of two variables, graphs of functions of two variables, contour diagrams, linear functions, functions of three variables. MA-UY 1424 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1124 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1424 covers the same material as MA-UY 1124 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1022 (with a grade of B or better) or MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 (with a grade of B or better).
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
4 Credits Introduction to Programming & Problem Solving CS-UY1114
This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors who have limited prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the course are illustrated by examples from various disciplines. ABET competencies: a,b,c, e, f, g, k
Corequisite: EX-UY 1; Anti-requisite: CS-UY 1113
4 Credits The Advanced College Essay EXPOS-UA2
The course follows Writing the Essay (EW 1013) and provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, using written texts as evidence, developing ideas, and writing argumentative essays. It stresses analysis, argument, reflection, revision, and collaborative learning.
Prerequisite(s): EW 1013


Fall Semester

3 Credits Electricity, Magnetism, & Fluids PH-UY2023
This is the second course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Fluids at rest and in motion. An introduction to electric and magnetic forces and fields. Electric charge density. Electric fields from simple charge distributions. Electric potential. Capacitance. Magnetic forces. Magnetic field from a current loop. Inductance. Magnetism in matter. Current and resistance. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or an approved equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I, and EX-UY 1
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory I PH-UY2121
PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I (0.5:1:0:1). An introductory level experimental course. Fundamental laboratory experiments in classical mechanics and electrostatics. Stresses basic experimental techniques, error analysis, and written presentation of experiment results. Experiments require progressively more detailed and sophisticated analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2023.
4 Credits Calculus Iii: Multi-dimensional Calculus MA-UY2114
Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorems of Gauss and Stokes.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Anti-requisite: MA-UY 2514
4 Credits Data Analysis MA-UY2224
An introductory course to probability and statistics. It affords the student some acquaintance with both probability and statistics in a single term. Topics in Probability include mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; the Central Limit Theorem and the normal approximation. Topics in Statistics include sampling distributions of sample mean and sample variance; normal, t-, and Chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; testing of hypotheses; least squares regression model. Applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data are integrated into the course.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2233 or MA-UY 3012 or MA-UY 3022.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY1424, or MA-UY 1132

HuSS Elective 1, Credits: 4.00*

Spring Semester

3 Credits Waves, Optics, & Thermodynamics PH-UY2033
This is the third course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Water, sound and electromagnetic waves. Reflection, scattering and absorption. Standing waves and spectra. Superposition, diffraction and beats. Geometrical optics. Introduction to thermodynamics; temperature, heat, and entropy. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Co-requisites: PH-UY 2131, and EX-UY 1.
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory II PH-UY2131
PH 2131 General Physics Laboratory II (0.5:1:0:1). The second part of the introductory physics laboratory program. Fundamental laboratory experiments in E&M, waves, optics, and thermodynamics. Stresses experimental models and design, error and data analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Corequisite: PH-UY 2033
4 Credits Introduction to Modern and Solid State Physics PH-UY2344
Special theory of relativity, Michelson Morley experiment. Planck’s quantum hypothesis, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, Rutherford scattering, Bohr’s atom, DeBroglie wavelength, electron diffraction, wave function, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation. Application to: square well potential, one electron atom. Atomic nucleus, fission and fusion. Energy bands in a periodic lattice, Kronig Penney model, valence, conduction bands, impurity states, electron mobility. Semiconductor properties. Introduction to superconductivity; electron pairs, energy gap, Josephson effect.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2023; Co-requisite: PH-UY 2033 and MA-UY 2034.
4 Credits Linear Algebra and Differential Equations MA-UY2034
MA-UY 2034 is an introduction to ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. The course develops the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that are widely used in modern engineering and science. Linear algebra is used as a tool for solving systems of linear equations as well as for understanding the structure of solutions to linear (systems) of differential equations. Topics covered include the fundamental concepts of linear algebra such as Gaussian elimination, matrix theory, linear transformations, vector spaces, subspaces, basis, eigenvectors, eigenvalues and the diagonalization of matrices, as well as the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that commonly appear in modern engineering and science.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3083 or MA-UY 4204.

HuSS Elective 2, Credits: 4.00*


*To gain some breadth and depth of knowledge, take courses in at least two disciplines and at least one course at an advanced level.


Fall Semester

4 Credits Analytical Mechanics PH-UY2104
The course covers statics by virtual work and potential energy methods. Stability of equilibrium. Particle dynamics, harmonic oscillator and planetary motion. Rigid body dynamics in two and three dimensions. Lagrangian mechanics. Dynamics of oscillating systems.
Prerequisite: PH-UY 2023; Co-requisite: MA-UY 2034
4 Credits Applied Partial Differential Equations MA-UY4414
This course gives an overview of PDEs that occur commonly in the physical sciences with applications in heat flow, wave propagation, and fluid flow. Analytical as well as some numerical solution techniques will be covered, with a focus on applications rather than analysis.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 2034 or MA-UY 4204 or MA-UY 4214

STEM Elective, Credits: 4.00

HuSS Elective 3, Credits: 4.00*

Spring Semester

2 Credits Junior Physics Laboratory PH-UY3002
An intermediate level laboratory course providing in depth exposure to a selection of classic physics experiments. Students' experimental skill set is expanded and data analysis and communication skills developed.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2131 and PH-UY 2033; Co-requisites: PH-UY 2344 and MA-UY 2224.
4 Credits Electricity and Magnetism PH-UY3234
The course covers properties of the electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic field in vacuum and in material media. Maxwell’s equations with applications to elementary problems.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2033 and MA-UY 2114.
4 Credits Numerical Analysis MA-UY4424
In numerical analysis one explores how mathematical problems can be analyzed and solved with a computer. As such, numerical analysis has very broad applications in mathematics, physics, engineering, finance, and the life sciences. This course gives an introduction to this subject for mathematics majors. Theory and practical examples using Matlab will be combined to study a range of topics ranging from simple root-finding procedures to differential equations and the finite element method.
Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in (MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514) and (MA-UY 3034 or MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3113)

STEM Elective, Credits: 4.00

Free Elective, Credits: 3.00


*To gain some breadth and depth of knowledge, take courses in at least two disciplines and at least one course at an advanced level.


Fall Semester

Take all:

3 Credits Quantum Mechanics I PH-GY6673
Quantum mechanics with applications to atomic systems. The use of Schrodinger’s equations. Angular momentum and spin. Semi-classical theory of field-matter interaction.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 2122, PH-UY 3234 equivalents.
3 Credits Advanced Linear Algebra and Complex Variables MA-UY3113
This course provides a deeper understanding of topics introduced in MA-UY 2012 and MA-UY 2034 and continues the development of those topics, while also covering functions of a Complex Variable. Topics covered include: The Gram-Schmidt process, inner product spaces and applications, singular value decomposition, LU decomposition. Derivatives and Cauchy-Riemann equations, integrals and Cauchy integral theorem. Power and Laurent Series, residue theory.
Prerequisites: (MA-UY 2122 or MA-UY 2114 or MA-UY 2514) AND (MA-UY 2012 or MA-UY 2034). Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 1533, MA-UY 3112 or MA-UY 4433.

HuSS Elective 4, Credits: 4.00*

Free Elective, Credits: 3.00

and either take both:

2 Credits Introduction to Senior Project in Physics PH-UY4902
A qualified senior physics student or group of students work with a faculty member (and possibly graduate students) on an advanced problem in physics. In this introductory phase the student(s) and adviser select a suitable theoretical or experimental problem in the subject area and use various resources to solve it.
2 Credits Senior Seminar in Physics PH-UY4912
Senior physics students, in consultation with the instructor, study and prepare presentations on several current research topics in the general area of interdisciplinary physics. Students’ performance is based on the mastery of the material chosen and also on the quality of the presentation made to the instructor and the seminar members.

or take:

Math Elective, Credits: 4.00

Spring Semester

Take all:

4 Credits Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics PH-UY4124
The course covers fundamental laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, heat, internal energy and entropy. Topics include an introduction to statistical physics, and applications of Maxwell, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distributions.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2344, MA-UY 2114, and MA-UY 2224.

Physics Elective, Credits: 4.00

Math Elective, Credits: 4.00

Choose one:

4 Credits Senior Project in Physics PH-UY4904
In the project’s concluding phase, senior physics students or group of students work with a faculty member (and possibly graduate students) to solve an advanced problem in interdisciplinary physics. The conclusion of the project is a written report and an oral presentation made to the supervising faculty.
MA-UY4924 Please refer to the bulletin for more information


*To gain some breadth and depth of knowledge, take courses in at least two disciplines and at least one course at an advanced level.