Biomedical Engineering, M.S. | NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Biomedical Engineering, M.S.

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Biomedical engineering, a multi-disciplinary field, is behind some of the most important medical breakthroughs today. Working closely together, engineers, scientists, mathematicians, and physicians have developed artificial organs, internal and external prosthetics, multiple imaging modalities, and diagnostic and therapeutic devices. Biomedical engineering has significantly contributed to improved health care and quality of life.

The MS program in Biomedical Engineering merges coursework from Tandon’s engineering departments along with research opportunities with biomedical engineering faculty from across NYU to create a degree path that matches a student’s BME career objectives.

About the Program

The goal of the MS in Biomedical Engineering program is to give students an in-depth, advanced education that provides them with the analytical tools to perform fundamental and applied research in biomedical engineering.  Specific objectives include the following:

•   Enrolling students who come from many disciplines and bring different skill sets to solve a broad range of biomedical engineering problems. The program accommodates students with a BS/BA or a more advanced degree in biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, computer engineering, physics, chemistry, or biology.

•   Providing students with a cutting-edge program that integrates quantitative-engineering skills with medical sciences. Students acquire the skills to engage in technological innovations that give people longer, healthier and more productive lives.

•   Giving students an opportunity to focus on a wide range of contemporary topics critical to biomedical engineering. Core courses covering broad aspects of biomedical engineering will be followed by a choice of elective courses in such areas as biomedical imaging, tissue engineering and repair, biomedical devices, rehabilitation engineering, and capped by experiential learning in research laboratories or project courses.

•   Merging the coursework, leadership and talents found at NYU Tandon's engineering departments with research opportunities led by biomedical engineering faculty across NYU. The collaboration between NYU Tandon and NYU School of Medicine is leading to a new model of biomedical education and to developing students with practical and fundamental knowledge. Students engage in independent study and research projects in collaboration with biomedical researchers and clinicians, on problems of immediate importance and application.


The BME MS program will consider applications for admission from students with a BS/BA or a more advanced degree in biomedical, chemical, mechanical, or electrical engineering; computer engineering or science; physics; mathematics, chemistry; or biological sciences. We also consider applications from students with medical, dental, nursing and legal degrees.

The program requires that all applicants must have taken two semesters of college-level calculus and two semesters of calculus-based physics. It further highly recommends that each student’s undergraduate preparation include the following sequence of math and science courses:

•   1 semester of linear algebra

•   1 semester of ordinary differential equations

•   1 semester of multivariable calculus

•   2 semesters of biology with labs

•   2 semesters of general chemistry with labs

For those feeling interests in the biomaterials and tissue engineering studies, additional background in organic chemistry and biochemistry is desirable. For those feeling interests in the bioinstrumentation of medical imaging studies, additional advanced mathematics courses, e.g. complex variables, partial differential equations are recommended. Though not required, exposure to CAD/FEA, Matlab, C++ /Python computer programming experience is highly desirable.

 

For International Students:

Applications can only be considered from international students who have completed all of the undergraduate math and science courses listed above.

 

For Domestic Students:

Applicants pursuing a career change and lacking some of the undergraduate courses listed above may be admitted conditionally if they present a strong record of achievement in their undergraduate field of study and agree to enroll in the missing undergraduate courses to raise their level of knowledge so that they are better prepared for the analytically rigorous coursework that is part of the BME MS program. Such undergraduate courses do not count toward the MS degree’s credit requirements.

Find out more about Admission Requirements.


Curriculum

The 30-credit curriculum offers a set of three core required courses (9 credits), and five or four elective courses (15 or 12 credits). Experiential learning is an additional important part of the program, with two options. The first option specifies research with submission of a 6-9 credit master's thesis. Students who choose the master’s thesis option must register for 6-9 credits of BE-GY 997X and then write and defend a master’s thesis according to Tandon School guidelines. The second option specifies research performed as 6 credits of guided studies, project-based research courses, and/or internships. To meet graduation requirements, students must achieve an overall GPA of 3.0 in all courses (including MS thesis, guided studies or research courses) and must not have more than two grades of C+ or lower.

Listed below are required courses that fulfill the requirements for an MS in Biomedical Engineering.


3 Credits Anatomy, Physiology, & Biophysics I BE-GY6103
Anatomy and Physiology are the sciences that identify body structures and how they function and interact, respectively. Therefore, academic training for biomedical engineering must include a sound, comprehensive knowledge of human anatomy and physiology. While the course emphasizes normal functions, it also considers the consequences of disease and injury and deals with the body's potential for recovery and compensation. The Biophysics' component examines the underlying physical principles of organ function. Part I of this two-part sequence focuses on Cell Physiology and Homeostasis, Cardiac, Nervous, and Respiratory systems. The course will be taught using a "systems engineering" approach and introduce the design considerations for artificial organs. The material includes hands-on demonstration of technology to measure EEGs, EKG and respiratory function.
3 Credits Applied Mathematics and Statistics for Biomedical Engineering BE-GY6473
This course introduces applied mathematics and advanced statistical methods commonly encountered in biomedical engineering, while covering probability theory to bridge between mathematics and statistics. The topics include: generalized linear mixed models, discrete-time models, stochastic processes, elements of information theory, time-series analysis, causality analysis, and rudiments of probability theory. Beyond structured learning in class, students will work on the analysis of real datasets from the biomedical fields.
Prerequisite: Basic knowledge of calculus
3 Credits Biomedical Instrumentation BE-GY6503
This course gives an overview on the theory, design and application of biomedical instrumentation used for dagnosis, monitoring, treatment and scientific study of physiological systems. The objective of this course is to enable students to design, build and test useful circuits, and to interface them with a computer using a data acquisition system for further signal analysis and processing. Cross-listed with BE-GY 6503.
Prerequisite: EE-UY 2024 or equivalent course in circuits, programming experience.

 


Guided Studies in Biomedical Engineering BE-GY871X
Under faculty supervision, students study selections, analyses, solutions and presentations of biomedical engineering reports for problems in products, processes or equipment design, or other fields of biomedical-engineering practices. Conferences are scheduled. Master's degree candidates are required to submit three unbound copies of their reports to advisers one week before the last day of classes.
Prerequisite: degree status.
Research in Biomedical Engineering BE-GY873X
Supervised by faculty, this course examines engineering fundamental or applied research in biomedical engineering. Conferences are scheduled. Master's degree candidates are required to submit three unbound copies of their reports to advisers one week before the last day of classes.
Prerequisite: Degree status.
MS Thesis in Biomedical Engineering BE-GY997X
The thesis for the master's degree in biomedical engineering should report the results of an original investigation of problems in biomedical engineering or application of physical, chemical or other scientific principles to biomedical engineering. The thesis may involve experimental research, theoretical analyses or process designs, or combinations of them. Master's degree candidates are required to submit four unbound copies to advisers before the seventh Wednesday before commencement. Registration of at least 9 credits required.
Prerequisite: Degree status.
1.5 Credits Internship for MS I CP-GY9911
Internship is a supervised, creative experience that provides full-time graduate students with the opportunity to enhance and augment classroom learning experiences in their field of study. The experience culminates in written reports, from the student, to the faculty supervisors as well as written reports from the supervisor.
Prerequisites: Advisor's approval.
1.5 Credits Internship for MS II CP-GY9921
Internship is a supervised, creative experience that provides full-time graduate students with the opportunity to enhance and augment classroom learning experiences in their field of study. The experience culminates in written reports, from the student, to the faculty supervisors as well as written reports from the supervisor.
Prerequisites: Advisor's approval and CP-GY 9911

More specifically, there are two options for fulfilling the requirements of those research credit courses:

Option 1 - MS Thesis: BME MS students can choose BE-GY 997X MS Thesis in Biomedical Engineering for at least 6 credits, at maximum 9 credits in total, which requires the pass of an oral defense in front of the MS thesis committee, and a formal written thesis submitted to the MS thesis committee, BME academic advisor, and NYU Tandon.

Option 2 - Guided studies or Research: Instead of MS thesis, students can select BE-GY 871X Guided Studies in Biomedical Engineering or BE-GY 873X Research in Biomedical Engineering for exactly 6 credits in total, which requires a less formal written report submitted to research advisor and BME academic advisor for each semester. Out of the 6 credits of those experiential learning course, up to 3 credits can be taken as the internship courses, i.e. CP-GY 9911 Internship for MS I and CP-GY 9921 Internship for MS II.


15 credits of elective courses if 6 credits of research/experiential learning (Guided Studies, Research, or MS Thesis) are taken, OR 12 credits of elective courses if 9 credits of MS Thesis are taken.

Out of those elective courses, up to 6 credits may be offered by other departments and eligible to count towards BME MS degree requirements, based on the approval from the BME Department. Typically, those 6 credits of outside electives should have close connection with BME field, or beneficial to the student’s academic, research, or professional development.

The remaining 9 credits (if 6 credits of research/experiential learning are taken) or 6 credits (if 9 credits of MS Thesis are taken) must be BE-GY courses offered by BME Dept. The list for eligible BE-GY electives is shown below:

3 Credits Anatomy, Physiology, & Biophysics II BE-GY6113
Part II of this sequence focuses on the muscular, skeletal, renal and endocrine systems and includes discussions on skin and basic oncology. This part is taught using a ?systems? approach and link concepts from BE-GY 6013. The material includes hands-on demonstration of technology to measure EMG.
Prerequisites: BE-GY 6013.
3 Credits Biomaterials: Engineering Principles and Design Consideration BE-GY6803
This course will provide the student with an overview of the techniques used to evaluate and design with materials used in biomedicine in the context of reconstructing, repairing, replacing or augmenting diseased or injured tissue or organs in the human body.
Prerequisites: Calculus I, Calculus II and Ordinary Differential Equations.

Course objective:
1. Introduce the concepts of CAD/FEA used with the design of non-orthopedic devices that interface to the neurologic and cardiovascular systems.
2. To present the various classes of biomaterials such as metals, ceramics, man-made polymers and those derived from nature.
3. To simulate and identify the pertinent interactions between materials and composites with living tissue and their durability.
4. To give specific examples for the design of an artificial organ, i.e. artificial heart.
3 Credits Natural Polymers and Materials BE-GY6723
The course introduces natural and biomimetic polymers. It is taught with an interdisciplinary view of biology, chemistry and macromolecular science. Topics covered include natural building blocks and methods by which nature carries out polymer synthesis and modification reactions, DNA, structural proteins, plant proteins, polysaccharides, polyesters, biosurfactants, polymers built from natural monomers and a wide variety of renewable resources, uses of these polymers as fibers, films, rheological modifiers, flocculants, foams, adhesives and membranes, and special applications of natural polymers in medicine and as biodegradable plastics.
Co-listed as CM-GY 7923. Prerequisite: CM-UY 1004 and BMS-UY 1004.
3 Credits Rehabilitation Engineering BE-GY6763
This course will provide the student with fundamental knowledge of theory and practice in rehabilitation engineering. Based on an understanding of the pathophysiological processes that lead to disability, students will be introduced to medical, physiological, and psychological considerations in the design of rehabilitative interventions and learn to implement analytical methods for the evaluation of human performance in rehabilitation medicine applications.
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, statics and dynamics, and adviser's approval
3 Credits Tissue Engineering BE-GY9443
This courses teaches basic biological processes that occur during blood contact with artificial surfaces; how to critically read and review literature on tissue engineering; how to anticipate biocompatibility issues with a variety of implant devices students may later encounter; current approaches directed toward the engineering of cell-based replacements for various tissue types.
Prerequisite: Adviser's approval.
3 Credits Engineering Tissue Regeneration BE-GY9453
This course presents engineering design principles for stimulation and control of tissue repair through regenerative mechanisms. Based on approaches for control of cell differentiation and growth, the application of engineering to the modeling and design of systems, agents, and processes to stimulate regenerative repair of tissues will be discussed. Example topics such as stem cell delivery and microenvironment design; drug and gene delivery; role of signaling pathway modulation; extracellular vesicle-mediated communication; signaling via electrical, mechanical, and fluid transport control will be discussed.
Prerequisites: Biochemistry highly recommended and adviser's approval
3 Credits Bio-optics BE-GY6303
Recent growth in using optics technology for biomedical research and health care has been explosive. New applications are made possible by emerging technologies in lasers, optoelectronic devices, fiber optics, physical and chemical sensors and imaging?all of which are now applied to medical research, diagnostics and therapy. This sequence course on optics for biomedical students combines fundamental knowledge of the generation and interaction of electromagnetic waves with applications to the biomedical field. The goal is for this approach is to provide tools for researchers in bio-physics and to familiarize researchers, technologists and premed students with cutting-edge approaches.
Prerequisite(s): An undergraduate course in physics that includes electricity, magnetism and waves such as PH-UY 2023, an undergraduate course in physics that includes electricity, magnetism and waves such as PH-UY 2023 and multivariable calculus such as MA-UY 2122 and MA-UY 2122.
3 Credits Biomedical Device Design and Development BE-GY6513
This course aims to provide the essential knowledge in the biomedical product development (e.g. material properties, fabrication processes and design techniques for different applications) in order to provide ways to speed up the product development cycle. This course is multidisciplinary and covers the principles in mechanical, chemical, biological, and physiological aspects. Students can learn the techniques to apply the acquired knowledge of biomedical device design, prototyping, and manufacturing for particular applications they are interested.
Prerequisite: Advisor's Approval
3 Credits Biomems and Microfluidics BE-GY6523
This course targets to: (1) introduce fundamental design and microfabrication concepts of BioMEMS, microfluidics and lab-on-chip systems, (2) expose students to the relevant biomedical and biological applications. The course is divided into four main sections: (i) BioMEMS/Microfluidic materials and microfabrication, (ii) Statistics and modeling for BioMEMS, (iiI) BioMEMS sensors and actuators, and (iv) Microfluidic and Lab-on-chip systems.
Prerequisites: Adviser's approval
3 Credits Digital Signal Processing I BE-GY6403
Discrete and continuous-time linear systems. Z-transform. Fourier transforms. Sampling. Discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Fast Fourier transform (FFT). Digital filtering. Design of FIR and IIR filters. Windowing. Least squares in signal processing. Minimum-phase and all-pass systems. Digital filter realizations. Matlab programming exercises.
3 Credits Digital Signal Processing I ECE-GY6113
Discrete and continuous-time linear systems. Z-transform. Fourier transforms. Sampling. Discrete Fourier transform (DFT). Fast Fourier transform (FFT). Digital filtering. Design of FIR and IIR filters. Windowing. Least squares in signal processing. Minimum-phase and all-pass systems. Digital filter realizations. Matlab programming exercises. Co-listed as BE-GY 6403
Prerequisites: Graduate status. *Online version available.
3 Credits Probability and Stochastic Processes BE-GY6453
Continuous and discrete random variables and their joint probability distribution and density functions; Functions of one random variable and their distributions; Independent random variables and conditional distributions; One function of one and two random variables; Two functions of two random variables and their joint density functions; Jointly distributed discrete random variables and their functions; Characteristic functions and higher order moments; Covariance, correlation, orthogonality; Jointly Gaussian random variables; Linear functions of Gaussian random variables and their joint density functions. Stochastic processes and the concept of Stationarity; Strict sense stationary (SSS) and wide sense stationary (WSS) processes; Auto correlation function and its properties; Poisson processes and Wiener processes; Stochastic inputs to linear time-invariant (LTI) systems and their input-output autocorrelations; Input-output power spectrum for linear systems with stochastic inputs; Minimum mean square error estimation (MMSE) and orthogonality principle; Auto regressive moving average (ARMA) processes and their power spectra. Co-listed as EL-GY 6303.
Prerequisites: Graduate status
3 Credits Probability and Stochastic Processes ECE-GY6303
Continuous and discrete random variables and their joint probability distribution and density functions; Functions of one random variable and their distributions; Independent random variables and conditional distributions; One function of one and two random variables; Two functions of two random variables and their joint density functions; Jointly distributed discrete random variables and their functions; Characteristic functions and higher order moments; Covariance, correlation, orthogonality; Jointly Gaussian random variables; Linear functions of Gaussian random variables and their joint density functions. Stochastic processes and the concept of Stationarity; Strict sense stationary (SSS) and wide sense stationary (WSS) processes; Auto correlation function and its properties; Poisson processes and Wiener processes; Stochastic inputs to linear time-invariant (LTI) systems and their input-output autocorrelations; Input-output power spectrum for linear systems with stochastic inputs; Minimum mean square error estimation (MMSE) and orthogonality principle; Auto regressive moving average (ARMA) processes and their power spectra. Co-listed as BE-GY 6453.
Prerequisite: Graduate status. *Online version available.
3 Credits Biomedical Imaging I BE-GY6203
This course introduces the physics, instrumentation and signal-processing methods used in X-ray imaging (projection radiography), X-ray computed tomography, nuclear medicine (SPECT/PET), ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. Also listed under: EL-GY 6813

Prerequisites: Undergraduate level courses in multivariable calculus (MA-UY 2112 & MA-UY 2122 or MA-UY 2114), physics (PH-UY 2033), probability (MA-UY 3012), signals and systems (EE-UY 3054). Students who do not have prior courses in signals ans systems must take EL-GY 6113 / BE-GY 6403 - Digital Signal Processing I as a prerequisite or must obtain instructor's approval; EL-GY 6123 - Image and Video Processing is also recommended but not required.
3 Credits Medical Imaging I ECE-GY6813
This course introduces the physics, instrumentation and signal processing methods used in X-ray imaging (projection radiography), X-ray computed tomography, nuclear medicine (SPECT/PET), ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging. Co-listed with BE-GY 6203

Prerequisites: Undergraduate level courses in multivariable calculus (MA-UY 2112 & MA-UY 2122 or MA-UY 2114), physics (PH-UY 2033), probability (MA-UY 3012), signals and systems (EE-UY 3054). Students who do not have prior courses in signals ans systems must take EL-GY 6113 / BE-GY 6403 - Digital Signal Processing I as a prerequisite or must obtain instructor's approval; EL-GY 6123 - Image and Video Processing is also recommended but not required.
3 Credits Bioethics Seminar BE-GY9753
This graduate-level seminar course discusses the ethical issues relevant to today's bioengineers and molecular and cell biologists. Topics include: Darwin's theory of evolution; science and religion in twentieth-century America; Intelligent Design Theory; social Darwinism and the concomitant rise of eugenics in Europe and the U.S., the ways in which molecular genetics has challenged historical categories of race; the ethical, social, and legal implications of the Human Genome Project (specifically genetic privacy and testing, human genes and intellectual property); argo-biotechnology and the science, ethics, and politics of genetically modified organisms (GMOs); and the science, politics, and ethics of human-embryonic-stem-cell research. The student is encouraged to think about the way in which debates concerning ?nature versus nurture? have been framed historically, in order to understand current controversies over that distinction.
3 Credits Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering BE-GY6353
Topics of special interest in Biomedical Engineering are announced before the semester in which they are offered.
Prerequisite: adviser's approval.

 


Biomedical Engineering MS students must register for BE-GY 9730 Colloquium in Biomedical Engineering, 0 credit, every semester. Prestigious scientists and engineers from academia and industry are invited to this colloquium course for presenting their scientific discoveries and technology developments in biomedical engineering fields.

Biomedical engineering MS students must register for BE-GY 9740 Seminar in Biomedical Engineering, 0 credits, for a minimum of two semesters. Students gain the opportunity in this seminar course to develop presentation and communication skills, and present their own research findings, progress or relevant literature review.

All students must either demonstrate knowledge and proficiency of at least one computer programming language (C, C++, VB, Python, Matlab, or R, etc.), or register for an appropriate computer programming course as an elective.