Sustainable Urban Environments, BS

On Campus

New York City

Cities play a critical role in addressing the environmental challenges that face the world today. The major in Sustainable Urban Environments prepares students to make cities more sustainable.  Students gain an understanding of the social and technical issues in urban environmental problems, and an appreciation of the policy and planning approaches that are necessary to create more livable, sustainable, and equitable cities. Multidisciplinary courses emphasize project-based learning, using New York City as an urban laboratory, and also examining sustainable cities in a global context.

Directed studies and capstone projects provide students with essential experience in conducting and presenting research at public forums within the School of Engineering. By the program’s end, our graduates are prepared to enter various environmental fields, including urban planning and design. They also partake in opportunities in social work, government, education, and museums.

Curriculum

Core (24 credits)

2 Credits Introduction to Civil Engineering CE-UY1002
This course introduces the student to the profession and practice of civil engineering. The course has four primary components: (1) a review of the principal subdisciplines of civil engineering and their relationship to urban and regional infrastructure; (2) a review of professional ethics and the responsibilities of engineers to their profession and to the general public, which includes a detailed study and discussion of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) codes of practice, and the use of case studies for illustration and discussion; (3) the use of AutoCAD as a tool for computer-based drawings, and the use of spreadsheets to develop analytic algorithms to solve simple engineering problems; and (4) an introduction to the use of GIS. The course includes a laboratory on the use of AutoCAD, as well as on GIS. Each laboratory is 6-7 weeks long.
Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.
3 Credits Sustainable Cities CE-UY4043
The course provides an overview of issues that need to be addressed to make a city sustainable, beginning with a definition of what is intended by the concept of sustainability and a discussion of what is the essence of a city. Students are asked to become familiar with the major challenges in making a city sustainable, and to provide, as part of their homework, a paper addressing a topic covered by the course through research and, where necessary, proposed solutions.
4 Credits History of New York's Urban Infrastructure HI-UY3034W
This survey of New York City’s infrastructure concentrates on water, sanitation and public health, electrical and communications systems, the development of housing and real estate, the security infrastructure and plans for the future. The course explores how the city’s political economy has shaped its physical environment and how technological innovations have made the city modern
and postmodern.
Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
and postmodern.
Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
4 Credits Design of Cities URB-UY2024W
This course helps students examine cities from different perspectives, and to understand the design principles that create effective city spaces and how the city is a dynamic force, always changing through the impact of individuals and organizations. The class focuses on the role of historical, physical and social context in making sense of cities and how city problems can be identified, presented to others and addressed in various ways (through psychological and sociological studies, literature, art, etc.). Students complete a team-based project that involves the study of an innovative development project within the city and how it relates to its physical and social context.
Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
4 Credits Methods for Studying Urban Environments URB-UY2044
This course provides students with a foundation for understanding and using social science research methods to study urban environments. In this course, students will gain an understanding of quantitative and qualitative approaches to social science research. They will be introduced to a range of data collection methods that are used to study urban environments and also t strategies for data analysis. The course will involve a group research project with a real world client, as well as lectures, discussions, a group presentation and paper, exams, readings and several assignments.
Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements

One of the following:

3 Credits Traffic Engineering CE-UY3303
This course covers the fundamentals of traffic engineering. The characteristics of traffic streams, and how they are quantitatively described is included. The course covers an overview of traffic control and operations, including the timing and design of pre-timed and actuated signals. An introduction to highway capacity and level of service analysis is included, and the analysis of basic freeway segments and multilane highways is covered as an example of this type of analysis.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
3 Credits Introduction to Transportation Systems CE-UY3313
This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual elements of transportation systems and describes the approaches used to analyze and design transportation systems. The course covers the basic material about transportation systems, the context within which they operate and a characterization of their behavior.
Prerequisite: Junior status.
3 Credits Introduction to Urban Infrastructure Systems Management CE-UY4033
This course provides students with an overview of key issues involved in the planning, management, operations and maintenance of urban infrastructure systems, including transportation, water supply, power, communications and information systems. It includes elements of engineering and technology, management, economics, finance, regulatory and public policy that have an impact on the sustainable development of the urban environment. The course features several distinguished guest lecturers from infrastructure industries and public agencies who share significant case studies with students. The course includes a component on GIS, with a focus on how to collect, integrate and share spatial data in urban infrastructure management. Group projects are required.

Tracks/SUE Electives (16 credits)

Select at least 1 course from each group

History Group

    3 Credits History of New York City Transit System CE-UY3353
    This course traces the technological history of public transportation in New York City and investigates its role in the development of the city, its economy and its social fabric. From the early days of horse-drawn public carriages to the modern subway system, the role of the public transit in the historical development patterns of New York City is treated. The course covers trolley systems, the age of the elevated railways and the subway system. Political, social and economic issues involved in the development of these critical infrastructures are discussed. Students develop independent project reports on aspects of the NYC public transit system, or on public-transit systems in other major world cities.
    Prerequisites: Junior Status or permission of instructor
    3 Credits History of NYC Transit System HI-UY2353
    4 Credits Introduction to New York City History HI-UY2514W
    The history and development of the city of New York from the exploration by Verrazano to the present taught by writing intensive method. Major themes include the evolution of the city's political economy, political and economic influence on the use of land and space, and ethnic and class conflict in the urban environment.
    Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements
    4 Credits Urban Environmental History HI-UY2724
    This course will examine the development of cities, primarily in North America, the evolution of the technologies used for that development, and their effect on the natural environment of cities and their regions, and the effects of the modernization and electrification of rural America on cities. Students will use a broad toolkit of historical methods and modes, including environmental history, social history, world history, and history of technology.
    Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements.
    4 Credits Seminar in Urban Infrastructure History HI-UY4334W
    This seminar investigates the urban and environmental history of New York City’s infrastructure, including water, sewage, transportation, housing and office construction. The course investigates these systems in the context of the environmental, political and economic concerns that shape the city’s
    infrastructure. The course looks at the transnational circulation of ideas about designing and constructing urban systems. Questions include: How and why are infrastructure systems built? Why are they built the way they are? How do the technologies used affect the environment? Are the systems sustainable and interoperable? How do ideas about infrastructural needs, design and financing circulate transnationally?
    Prerequisites: HI-UY 3034W

    Social Science Group

      4 Credits Environmental Psychology PS-UY2324W
      This course looks at how people interact with their environments: how settings affect behavior; how people change environments to fit their needs; and how people can become an active part of the environmental-design process. The course discusses how people use space and the way environmental design meets (or fails to meet) human needs. These concerns are valid for very-small-scale design problems (as in human-factors engineering); mid-size spaces (architecture and interior design); large-scale spaces (communities, urban areas).
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements
      . Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      4 Credits Human Factors in Engineering Design PS-UY2724
      The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with basic concepts, research findings and theories related to the way in which human characteristics, capabilities and limitations, including physiology and psychology, affect system design and performance. Students will develop a basic understanding of methods for studying and assessing human behavior and for analyzing human performance. It will introduce aspects of system, interface, organizational design and physical setting as they influence operators and performance. Satisfies an HuSS Elective.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements.
      4 Credits Psychology of Sustainability PS-UY3724
      This course addresses the psychological bases of environmental problems, investigates theories of behavior change as they relate to environmental issues and introduces practical strategies to foster behavior change. Topics include the ways in which the fit (or lack of it) of design to human behavior can affect environmentally relevant behaviors, such as energy use and recycling. Course issues include designing green buildings and creating sustainable communities.
      Prerequisites: One Level 2 PS Elective. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      4 Credits Psych of Living in Extreme Environments PS-UY3754
      This course considers issues, research and theory in relation to creating human habitats in extreme space, undersea and polar regions. The course reviews firsthand experiences and formal studies of life in these settings, and extrapolates from work in other, less extreme human settings. Psychological issues include privacy, territoriality, isolation and crowding, light and views of nature, as well as personality and organizational issues. Students complete a research paper and engage in a team-design project.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      4 Credits Geographic Information Systems URB-UY2114
      Geographic Information Systems are computer systems for the storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of geographic data, that is data about features and phenomena on the surface of the earth. This course will introduce the students to GIS through hands-on computer exercises, as well as readings and lectures about cartography, tools, data, and the social impacts of GIS. GIS projects start with data and move through analysis to cartographic display. Pedagogically, we will be starting at the end moving backward to data and analysis.
      Note: This course cannot be used to satisfy Humanities/Social Science requirements for majors outside of the TCS department.
      4 Credits Humans in the Urban Environment URB-UY2034
      In an increasingly urban dominated world, the environmental and ecological underpinnings of the human species help us understand why and how permanent settlements and cities evolve. The course covers basic environmental and ecological relationships, including geological, climatological, biomes, population growth models and carrying capacity. Receiving special emphasis are those ecosystems most important to humans throughout prehistory and history. The development of agriculture, increased human resource productivity and the resulting increase in population density is discussed as an underlying basis for developing and maintaining urban population areas. Also included is a discussion of changes in human social organization and psychology necessary for urban living.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
      4 Credits Urban Impact Assessment URB-UY3354
      Impact assessment is an international, interdisciplinary field of knowledge and practice for anticipating the conditions of change and managing their consequences in order to enhance everyone’s quality of life. Two phrases
      can describe its essence: “comprehensive and integrated” and “proactive and creative.” Urban impact assessment applies that knowledge at the urban scale, ranging from local to global. Coupled with the recent innovation of “sustainability assessment,” it aims to advance the proposition of urban sustainability. This course also explores the dimensions and proportions of that prospect by applying urban impact assessment methodology to a variety of cases at hand.
      Prerequisites: URB-UY 2034 or URB-UY 2024W. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.

      Environmental Group

      4 Credits Beyond Oil: Fueling Tomorrow's Vehicles SEG-UY2184W
      This course explores the alternatives to oil that vehicle manufacturers are pursuing in their desire to wean away from oil and its mercurial price swings. Students will be required to choose two of these alternative approaches and prepare white papers on each, covering the technology, advantages, limitations or drawbacks, cost saving, environmental impact and likelihood of success in the market place. The focus will be on biofuels, hybrids, the fuel cell, natural gas, hydrogen, the electric car. Satisfies an HuSS Elective.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements.
      4 Credits Writing About Nature & the Environment SEG-UY2194W
      In this course, students explore today’s major environmental and ecological issues and write a number of pieces that discuss causes and possible solutions. Each article is based on a literature search and on interviews with professionals. Class critiques of articles are an integral part of the learning process. Topics include global warming, renewable energy, health and the environment, environmental law and biodiversity. Authors of the best pieces are encouraged to submit them for publication.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Corequisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      4 Credits Introduction to Urban Planning URB-UY2064
      Introduction to Urban Planning explores planning precedents (the "big ideas") including the City Beautiful movement, Garden Cities, Modernism, and the New Urbanism; examines contemporary planning practices including zoning, transportation-oriented development, citizen participation, affordable housing, and land preservation; and explores "planning without planners" including suburban sprawl, self-built shanty towns/slums, and historic preservation. A case study approach will be used for all concepts (including field trips to iconic planned communities in New York City).
      Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
      4 Credits Natural Environment of New York City URB-UY2224
      New York is one of the world’s great cities and, like others, rests on a foundation of the natural environment. The geology and geographic history of the greater New York area is discussed—from plate tectonic origins through the recent (and ongoing) Ice Age, including the formation of river systems and the port. Also considered in detail is the evolution of ecological relationships, including human, throughout this time. Other topics include the changing climate through past epochs as well as today and their impact on the modern city. Also covered are current environmental challenges, such as water supply and quality, air quality, waste disposal and global effects, including atmospheric and ocean warming.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
      4 Credits Natural Environmental Catastrophes & Cities URB-UY2234
      Cities are extremely complex physical and human systems that can be severely disrupted by acute human-caused events such as war. However, the natural world can also have a severe impact on cities over brief intervals. This course concerns itself with four well-known phenomena that can and have influenced the evelopment, sustainability and even the survival of cities. Meteorological
      catastrophes, such as hurricanes, cyclones and typhoons, are discussed in detail. Also covered are less violent but equally destructive flooding by river and ocean; earthquake damage and its relationship to population density and the permanence of towns and cities throughout history; and volcanic eruptions,
      which, though rare, have disrupted cities and determined their initial locations.
      Finally, biological catastrophes, both macro and micro, such as pestilence and infestations, are discussed.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
      4 Credits Evidence-based Design URB-UY3034
      Designers—at the product, building, neighborhood or urban level—necessarily base their work on the perceived needs and desires of users and clients. Historically, these understandings have come from past practice, close interactions with clients or designer intuition. In recent years, however, design researchers have accumulated enough information to provide an empirical base upon which to base many design decisions. This class reviews the evidence for design, particularly as it relates to well-studied settings, such as health care, corrections and neighborhood design.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
      4 Credits Cities in Developing Countries URB-UY3214
      This course will examine different facets of cities in developing countries. It will address common problems in developing urban regions, gaining an understanding of common settlement patterns and urban systems by region. It will also focus on specific issues in representative cities of the regions studied. Specific issues will include water and sanitation, health, transportation and infrastructure, historic preservation, disaster risk reduction and housing initiatives. Cases will include representative cities from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean.
      Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
      4 Credits Planning for Healthy Cities URB-UY3234
      This course is designed to introduce students to the role of the built environment in promoting community health, focusing on the neighborhood scale. Although urban planning and public health are closely related in their history and their goals, these fields are typically taught and practiced independently. The course will examine health issues that can be influence by urban planning, and will explore the role of transportation, land use planning, urban design, community development, and environmental policy, to promote public health.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements
      4 Credits Hist & Design of Urban Parks URB-UY3314
      Today, urban parks have become an integral feature of most modern cities. This course describes the origins of urban parks—from private urban-palace gardens to the large, open “natural” public parks so critical to urban life today. The design of these parks, from formal Italian and French gardens to British Landscape gardens, is discussed. The course also examines the changing view of nature in Europe and America, from the Renaissance to the present, and how park design was influenced by this evolving view. The design was strongly influenced by the changing view of nature’s psychological, spiritual and even supposedly medical benefits, and by the need for “parks for the people” as an expression of the new democratic spirit in a changing world. This course also includes two of New York City’s most famous parks, Central Park in Manhattan and Prospect Park in Brooklyn.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements

      Project Courses (8 credits)

      4 Credits Internship URB-UY4034
      Students may undertake an internship for academic credit with an appropriate private, public, or non-profit agency or firm. The internship is an opportunity to extend learning outside of the classroom into a real world setting, and to explore career options tied to the major. Students complete 140 hours at the internship site and attend occasional class meetings. The course involves completing a learning contract, regular reflections, assignments, and a final presentation.
      Prerequisite: IDM/SUE/STS majors only. Permission of instructor required.
      4 Credits Capstone Project URB-UY4024
      The capstone is a research project that presents SUE students with an opportunity to translate previous coursework into an applied research effort. This is a real-world based course in which students work in teams to identify, research, and propose solutions to a multidisciplinary urban issue, supervised by an SUE faculty member in weekly class discussions. The field research should be supported by library research and culminates in a written and oral report.
      Prerequisites: Senior Status, permission of SUE faculty advisor. Note: Does not satisfy a humanities and social sciences elective.


      Humanities and Social Sciences General Education Requirements (24 Credits)

      4 Credits Writing the Essay: EXPOS-UA1
      This foundational writing course is required for CAS, Stern, Nursing, Social Work, Steinhardt and Tandon incoming undergraduates. Writing The Essay provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative and logical thinking, and clear, persuasive writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, to use texts as evidence, to develop ideas, and to write exploratory and argumentative essays. Exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning are emphasized. In Spring, sections 1-6 are, with department consent, available for undergraduates interested in writing about the Sciences. Students should email EWP for access codes. Sections 9-72 are regular Spring sections for undergraduates, excluding sections 66,67 which are for Tandon students in Brooklyn. In Fall, sections 16-125 are available to incoming undergraduates on the WSQ campus and sections 126-167 are available to incoming undergraduates on the BROOKLYN campus. Students are NOT permitted to add or switch sections after the first week of classes without first obtaining EWP permission. Contact: dm1@nyu.edu Two special versions requiring department consent are available to qualifying undergraduates. Writing the Essay, Science (sections 1-7 offered both Fall and Spring) is tailored for UA students with a STRONG interested in science, medicine or psychology. Students must contact an advisor to discuss this option and obtain access. Writing The Essay, Goddard (sections 8-13, offered in Fall only) is offered ONLY for students who live in the Goddard Residential College. Writing the Essay, Rubin (sections 14-15, offered in Fall only) is offered ONLY for students who have been selected for the Rubin Themed Writing the Essay Community. Students placed in these sections will receive instructions for enrollment.
      4 Credits The Advanced College Essay EXPOS-UA2
      The course follows Writing the Essay (EW 1013) and provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, using written texts as evidence, developing ideas, and writing argumentative essays. It stresses analysis, argument, reflection, revision, and collaborative learning.
      Prerequisite(s): EW 1013

      4 Humanities and Social Sciences courses, including at least one course of Level 3 and one Writing Intensive course

      General Requirements (20 credits)

      1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
      In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
      3 Credits Introduction to Engineering and Design EG-UY1003
      This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation and data analysis, a team design project and analysis and presentation of engineering data and designs.

        General Technical Elective                                                               4 Credits

        General Math Elective                                                                      4 Credits

      8 credits of General Science Electives


      Technical Electives (8 credits)

      The technical electives requirement can be fulfilled by any course that advances the student’s knowledge of, or skills in applied science, engineering, or computer science.

      Free Electives (20 credits)

      Choose 5 courses of free electives from any department.


      This minor is open to all majors and is composed of 16 credits:

      Two of the core courses in SUE:

      4 Credits History of New York's Urban Infrastructure HI-UY3034W
      This survey of New York City’s infrastructure concentrates on water, sanitation and public health, electrical and communications systems, the development of housing and real estate, the security infrastructure and plans for the future. The course explores how the city’s political economy has shaped its physical environment and how technological innovations have made the city modern
      and postmodern.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      and postmodern.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      4 Credits Design of Cities URB-UY2024W
      This course helps students examine cities from different perspectives, and to understand the design principles that create effective city spaces and how the city is a dynamic force, always changing through the impact of individuals and organizations. The class focuses on the role of historical, physical and social context in making sense of cities and how city problems can be identified, presented to others and addressed in various ways (through psychological and sociological studies, literature, art, etc.). Students complete a team-based project that involves the study of an innovative development project within the city and how it relates to its physical and social context.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
      4 Credits Methods for Studying Urban Environments URB-UY2044
      This course provides students with a foundation for understanding and using social science research methods to study urban environments. In this course, students will gain an understanding of quantitative and qualitative approaches to social science research. They will be introduced to a range of data collection methods that are used to study urban environments and also t strategies for data analysis. The course will involve a group research project with a real world client, as well as lectures, discussions, a group presentation and paper, exams, readings and several assignments.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements
      4 Credits Introduction to Urban Policy URB-UY2054W
      The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the process and some of the major substantive issues in urban policy and politics in the United States, with some transnational contrasts. These include some of the basic issues of any political system: how cities function as part of a global urban network; the structure of decision-making, the allocation of resources and delivery of services.
      Prerequisite: Completion of first year writing requirements

      8 credits satisfied by courses chosen from the SEG electives list


      Sample Course Schedule

      The SUE program is a customizable program, which means students can arrange their schedules in accordance with their interests in consultation with the academic advisor. The sample schedule below is one way to fulfill the requirements, and it anticipates a semester abroad in the junior year at one of New York University's global university campuses.


      Fall Semester

      1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
      In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
      3 Credits Introduction to Engineering and Design EG-UY1003
      This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation and data analysis, a team design project and analysis and presentation of engineering data and designs.
      4 Credits Design of Cities URB-UY2024W
      This course helps students examine cities from different perspectives, and to understand the design principles that create effective city spaces and how the city is a dynamic force, always changing through the impact of individuals and organizations. The class focuses on the role of historical, physical and social context in making sense of cities and how city problems can be identified, presented to others and addressed in various ways (through psychological and sociological studies, literature, art, etc.). Students complete a team-based project that involves the study of an innovative development project within the city and how it relates to its physical and social context.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS Elective.
      4 Credits Writing the Essay: EXPOS-UA1
      This foundational writing course is required for CAS, Stern, Nursing, Social Work, Steinhardt and Tandon incoming undergraduates. Writing The Essay provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative and logical thinking, and clear, persuasive writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, to use texts as evidence, to develop ideas, and to write exploratory and argumentative essays. Exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning are emphasized. In Spring, sections 1-6 are, with department consent, available for undergraduates interested in writing about the Sciences. Students should email EWP for access codes. Sections 9-72 are regular Spring sections for undergraduates, excluding sections 66,67 which are for Tandon students in Brooklyn. In Fall, sections 16-125 are available to incoming undergraduates on the WSQ campus and sections 126-167 are available to incoming undergraduates on the BROOKLYN campus. Students are NOT permitted to add or switch sections after the first week of classes without first obtaining EWP permission. Contact: dm1@nyu.edu Two special versions requiring department consent are available to qualifying undergraduates. Writing the Essay, Science (sections 1-7 offered both Fall and Spring) is tailored for UA students with a STRONG interested in science, medicine or psychology. Students must contact an advisor to discuss this option and obtain access. Writing The Essay, Goddard (sections 8-13, offered in Fall only) is offered ONLY for students who live in the Goddard Residential College. Writing the Essay, Rubin (sections 14-15, offered in Fall only) is offered ONLY for students who have been selected for the Rubin Themed Writing the Essay Community. Students placed in these sections will receive instructions for enrollment.

      Spring Semester

      4 Credits Introduction to Urban Planning URB-UY2064
      Introduction to Urban Planning explores planning precedents (the "big ideas") including the City Beautiful movement, Garden Cities, Modernism, and the New Urbanism; examines contemporary planning practices including zoning, transportation-oriented development, citizen participation, affordable housing, and land preservation; and explores "planning without planners" including suburban sprawl, self-built shanty towns/slums, and historic preservation. A case study approach will be used for all concepts (including field trips to iconic planned communities in New York City).
      Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
      2 Credits Introduction to Civil Engineering CE-UY1002
      This course introduces the student to the profession and practice of civil engineering. The course has four primary components: (1) a review of the principal subdisciplines of civil engineering and their relationship to urban and regional infrastructure; (2) a review of professional ethics and the responsibilities of engineers to their profession and to the general public, which includes a detailed study and discussion of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) codes of practice, and the use of case studies for illustration and discussion; (3) the use of AutoCAD as a tool for computer-based drawings, and the use of spreadsheets to develop analytic algorithms to solve simple engineering problems; and (4) an introduction to the use of GIS. The course includes a laboratory on the use of AutoCAD, as well as on GIS. Each laboratory is 6-7 weeks long.
      Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.
      4 Credits The Advanced College Essay EXPOS-UA2
      The course follows Writing the Essay (EW 1013) and provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, using written texts as evidence, developing ideas, and writing argumentative essays. It stresses analysis, argument, reflection, revision, and collaborative learning.
      Prerequisite(s): EW 1013

        Humanities and Social Sciences Elective                                       4 Credits


      Fall Semester

      3 Credits Sustainable Cities CE-UY4043
      The course provides an overview of issues that need to be addressed to make a city sustainable, beginning with a definition of what is intended by the concept of sustainability and a discussion of what is the essence of a city. Students are asked to become familiar with the major challenges in making a city sustainable, and to provide, as part of their homework, a paper addressing a topic covered by the course through research and, where necessary, proposed solutions.

        SUE Track Course                                                                              4 Credits

        General Science Elective                                                                  4 Credits

        Humanities and Social Sciences Elective                                      4 Credits

      Spring Semester

      CE-UY3003 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

      OR

      3 Credits Introduction to Transportation Systems CE-UY3313
      This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual elements of transportation systems and describes the approaches used to analyze and design transportation systems. The course covers the basic material about transportation systems, the context within which they operate and a characterization of their behavior.
      Prerequisite: Junior status.

      OR

      3 Credits Introduction to Urban Infrastructure Systems Management CE-UY4033
      This course provides students with an overview of key issues involved in the planning, management, operations and maintenance of urban infrastructure systems, including transportation, water supply, power, communications and information systems. It includes elements of engineering and technology, management, economics, finance, regulatory and public policy that have an impact on the sustainable development of the urban environment. The course features several distinguished guest lecturers from infrastructure industries and public agencies who share significant case studies with students. The course includes a component on GIS, with a focus on how to collect, integrate and share spatial data in urban infrastructure management. Group projects are required.

      4 Credits Methods for Studying Urban Environments URB-UY2044
      This course provides students with a foundation for understanding and using social science research methods to study urban environments. In this course, students will gain an understanding of quantitative and qualitative approaches to social science research. They will be introduced to a range of data collection methods that are used to study urban environments and also t strategies for data analysis. The course will involve a group research project with a real world client, as well as lectures, discussions, a group presentation and paper, exams, readings and several assignments.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements

        SUE Track Course                                                                           4 Credits

        General Math Elective                                                                    4 Credits


      Fall Semester

      4 Credits Internship URB-UY4034
      Students may undertake an internship for academic credit with an appropriate private, public, or non-profit agency or firm. The internship is an opportunity to extend learning outside of the classroom into a real world setting, and to explore career options tied to the major. Students complete 140 hours at the internship site and attend occasional class meetings. The course involves completing a learning contract, regular reflections, assignments, and a final presentation.
      Prerequisite: IDM/SUE/STS majors only. Permission of instructor required.

        Free Elective                                                                                       4 Credits

        Free Elective                                                                                      4 Credits

        SUE Track Course                                                                             4 Credits

       

      Spring Semester

      4 Credits Introduction to Urban Policy URB-UY2054W
      The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the process and some of the major substantive issues in urban policy and politics in the United States, with some transnational contrasts. These include some of the basic issues of any political system: how cities function as part of a global urban network; the structure of decision-making, the allocation of resources and delivery of services.
      Prerequisite: Completion of first year writing requirements
      4 Credits History of New York's Urban Infrastructure HI-UY3034W
      This survey of New York City’s infrastructure concentrates on water, sanitation and public health, electrical and communications systems, the development of housing and real estate, the security infrastructure and plans for the future. The course explores how the city’s political economy has shaped its physical environment and how technological innovations have made the city modern
      and postmodern.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.
      and postmodern.
      Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.

        Free Elective                                                                                     4 Credits

        General Technical Elective                                                             4 Credits


      Fall Semester

        SUE Track Course                                                                             4 Credits

        General Technical Elective                                                               4 Credits

        Humanities and Social Sciences Electives                                     4 Credits

        Humanities and Social Sciences Electives                                    4 Credits

      Spring Semester

      4 Credits Capstone Project URB-UY4024
      The capstone is a research project that presents SUE students with an opportunity to translate previous coursework into an applied research effort. This is a real-world based course in which students work in teams to identify, research, and propose solutions to a multidisciplinary urban issue, supervised by an SUE faculty member in weekly class discussions. The field research should be supported by library research and culminates in a written and oral report.
      Prerequisites: Senior Status, permission of SUE faculty advisor. Note: Does not satisfy a humanities and social sciences elective.

        Free Electives                                                                                   4 Credits

        Free Electives                                                                                   4 Credits

        General Technical Elective                                                              4 Credits