Civil Engineering, BS

On Campus

Brooklyn Bridge

The Roman aqueducts, the London Bridge, the Hoover Dam, JFK airport — civil projects are found worldwide and throughout history. Civil engineers had a hand in the construction of each, and with quickly growing populations straining today’s infrastructures, they’re sure to spend time improving and building upon our built environment now and into the future.

Join Tandon's BS program in Civil Engineering and be a part of their ranks. You’ll train for a broad and exciting field with major impacts on society and its infrastructure. Our program is strongly practice-oriented, heavily emphasizing design, to prepare you for entry-level positions in any civil engineering sub-discipline or for graduate study.

The BS in Civil Engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET.

Program Information

Program outcomes are those abilities and skills that graduates are expected to have upon graduation with a BS in Civil Engineering degree. For these, the Department has adopted the 11 fundamental outcomes specified by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). They cover the full breadth and depth of the abilities and skills needed by modern engineering professionals. They are listed below with brief discussions of how each relates to the civil engineering profession.

(a) An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering. Virtually all of civil engineering involves the application of mathematics and basic sciences to the solution of real-world infrastructure problems. Fundamental engineering skills evolve directly from science and mathematics. Students are immersed in these applications across all subdisciplines of civil engineering.

(b) An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data. Civil engineers must engage in a number of basic experiments, and be aware of how to collect, organize, report and interpret the results of basic experiments and direct field observations of infrastructure operations. In the program, students are exposed to a wide range of laboratory experiments, including experiments in fluid mechanics, material behavior under loading, soil properties and behavior, and others. They also are exposed to the collection of field data related to environmental conditions and problems, highway and street traffic, and the monitoring of structures.

(c) An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints, such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability. The program is heavily design-oriented. Several courses include full design-project laboratories. Many additional courses have design components, and all students finish their academic programs with a comprehensive civil engineering capstone project. 

(d) An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams. Modern engineering is not done by stand-alone engineers. Any significant project involves several engineers, perhaps with different engineering backgrounds, as well as non-engineers (planners, architects, financiers, managers, etc). Students have the opportunity to work in teams in several courses, but particularly in the capstone design project.

(e) An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems. Engineers do not just solve problems brought to them by others. Engineers must spot problems before they become evident and describe them in terms that expedite their solution. As students progress through the program, they increase their participation in identifying and framing problems, as well as in developing comprehensive solutions.

(f) An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. All professionals must be keenly aware of their general and professional ethical responsibilities to society in general, and to others who require and pay for their services. Like many professions, engineers, and civil engineers in particular, have specific ethical codes issued by professional societies with which they must comply. General ethical considerations are discussed throughout the curriculum, and several courses have a strong focus on the basis for, and application of, professional ethical code.

(g) The ability to communicate effectively. Engineers must explain their views and solutions to problems in ways that can be understood clearly by other professionals and by the public. Modern communication involves written and oral forms, and a wide variety of electronic media. 

(h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, environmental and societal context. Engineers do not solve problems in a vacuum. Everything engineering professionals do affects the world around them. In the modern world economy, the “world” includes local neighborhoods, regions, states, nations and, indeed, the world. Solutions must be couched in a firm understanding of the impacts they will have on the environment, the economy and society.

(i) A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, lifelong learning. The engineering profession changes rapidly with the technological world. While general principles tend to change slowly, the specific materials, analysis techniques and approaches to engineering change quite rapidly. The body of knowledge graduates leaves with must be updated constantly and expanded during their professional lives. The program provides opportunities for students to appreciate this need, and develop useful skills for self-learning, now and in the future.

(j) Knowledge of contemporary issues. Engineering students study in a context in which local, regional and national infrastructure issues are in the forefront. Current issues and problems are discussed in virtually all courses, and students’ attention is called to immediate issues as they arise.

(k) An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for professional practice. The program is frequently updated to incorporate the latest approaches to engineering solutions, and to include the use of modern engineering tools. Important “tools” include a variety of computer programs for data analysis, simulation and design. 


The Department of Civil and Urban Engineering has established additional requirements and interpreted the Institute guidelines (found on this page; additional information can be found in the catalog).

The 128-credit curriculum is fulfilled by combining transfer credits, credits by examination and courses taken at the School of Engineering. Transfer credits in mathematics, chemistry, physics, humanities and social sciences are evaluated by the Office of Academic Affairs with faculty guidance from specific departments. Transfer credits in civil engineering and other technical areas are evaluated by the faculty of the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering. The length of time for a transfer student to complete the BS in Civil Engineering depends upon 3 factors:

  • The total number of transfer credits awarded;
  • The particular courses required to complete degree requirements; and
  • Enrollment status (part-time or full-time).

Transfer students should understand that they can be awarded transfer credits for courses with a C grade or better and then only for courses that are applicable toward the BS in Civil Engineering curriculum.

A residency requirement also must be fulfilled. To earn a BS, a student must complete a minimum of 30 credits at the School of Engineering at the junior or senior level (courses numbered CE 3XXX or CE 4XXX). These credits must include the design project, CE 4814.


You may register as a part-time student (fewer than 12 credits a semester), though the department does not offer many undergraduate courses in the evening. If you are enrolled as a part-time student, you should maintain close contact with your academic advisers to work out the details of course sequencing efficiently and effectively.


Curriculum

4 Credits Calculus I for Engineers MA-UY1024
This course covers: Library of Functions, functions of one variable. Limits, derivatives of functions defined by graphs, tables and formulas, differentiation rules for power, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, derivatives of trigonometric functions, the product and quotient rules, the chain rule, applications of the chain rule, maxima and minima, optimization. The definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and interpretations, theorems about definite integrals, anti-derivatives. MA-UY 1324 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1024 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1324 covers the same material as MA-UY 1024 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (with a grade of B or better). Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Calculus II for Engineers MA-UY1124
This course covers techniques of integration, introduction to ordinary differential equations, improper integrals, numerical methods of integration, applications of integration, sequences, series, power series, approximations of functions via Taylor polynomials, Taylor series, functions of two variables, graphs of functions of two variables, contour diagrams, linear functions, functions of three variables. MA-UY 1424 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1124 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1424 covers the same material as MA-UY 1124 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1022 (with a grade of B or better) or MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 (with a grade of B or better).
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
4 Credits Linear Algebra and Differential Equations MA-UY2034
MA-UY 2034 is an introduction to ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. The course develops the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that are widely used in modern engineering and science. Linear algebra is used as a tool for solving systems of linear equations as well as for understanding the structure of solutions to linear (systems) of differential equations. Topics covered include the fundamental concepts of linear algebra such as Gaussian elimination, matrix theory, linear transformations, vector spaces, subspaces, basis, eigenvectors, eigenvalues and the diagonalization of matrices, as well as the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that commonly appear in modern engineering and science.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3083 or MA-UY 4204.
4 Credits Data Analysis MA-UY2224
An introductory course to probability and statistics. It affords the student some acquaintance with both probability and statistics in a single term. Topics in Probability include mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; the Central Limit Theorem and the normal approximation. Topics in Statistics include sampling distributions of sample mean and sample variance; normal, t-, and Chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; testing of hypotheses; least squares regression model. Applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data are integrated into the course.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2233 or MA-UY 3012 or MA-UY 3022.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY1424, or MA-UY 1132

All students, except those who have earned a grade of 4 or 5 on the Calculus AB or BC AP Exam, take a mathematics placement examination. Students may be placed in an alternative course, which may not carry degree credit, based on the results of such placement examination. Students also may be advance-placed based upon AP or college math credit earned in high school. Students may substitute MA-UY 1324, which includes two additional contact hours, for MA-UY 1024.


4 Credits General Chemistry for Engineers CM-UY1004
This is a one-semester introductory course in general chemistry. It covers chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, gases, atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, organic, inorganic and polymeric materials and electrochemistry.
Corequisite: EX-UY 1
3 Credits Mechanics PH-UY1013
This course is the first of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Motion of particles and systems of particles. One-dimensional motion. Vectors and two-dimensional motions. Forces and acceleration. Conservation of energy and momentum. Rotations. The free and driven harmonic oscillator. Gravitation. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or an approved equivalent. Corequisites: MA-UY 1124 or approved equivalent, and EX-UY 1
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory I PH-UY2121
PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I (0.5:1:0:1). An introductory level experimental course. Fundamental laboratory experiments in classical mechanics and electrostatics. Stresses basic experimental techniques, error analysis, and written presentation of experiment results. Experiments require progressively more detailed and sophisticated analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2023.
3 Credits Electricity, Magnetism, & Fluids PH-UY2023
This is the second course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Fluids at rest and in motion. An introduction to electric and magnetic forces and fields. Electric charge density. Electric fields from simple charge distributions. Electric potential. Capacitance.
Magnetic forces. Magnetic field from a current loop. Inductance. Magnetism
in matter. Current and resistance. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or an approved equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I, and EX-UY 1
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory II PH-UY2131
PH 2131 General Physics Laboratory II (0.5:1:0:1). The second part of the introductory physics laboratory program. Fundamental laboratory experiments in E&M, waves, optics, and thermodynamics. Stresses experimental models and design, error and data analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Corequisite: PH-UY 2033
3 Credits Waves, Optics, & Thermodynamics PH-UY2033
This is the third course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Water, sound and electromagnetic waves. Reflection, scattering and absorption. Standing waves and spectra. Superposition, diffraction and beats. Geometrical optics. Introduction to thermodynamics; temperature, heat, and entropy. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Co-requisites: PH-UY 2131, and EX-UY 1.

  Science Elective                                                                               3 Credits

 Students may select a basic science elective from one of the following areas: biology, astrophysics and astronomy or geology and earth science.


1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
3 Credits Introduction to Engineering and Design EG-UY1003
This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation and data analysis, a team design project and analysis and presentation of engineering data and designs.
3 Credits Engineering Problem Solving and Programming CS-UY1133
This introductory course in engineering problem solving and computer programming is for all undergraduate engineering students without prior programming experience in any language. The course covers the fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the MATLAB programming language. Concepts and methods are illustrated by examples from various engineering disciplines. Useful numerical techniques and their applications to real-world problems in science and engineering are also discussed. ABET competencies: a, e, k.
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.


EXPOS-UA1 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EXPOS-UA2 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

  Humanities and Social Sciences Electives                                     16 Credits

Students must take 16 credits of elective courses in the humanities and social sciences. Consult the Technology, Culture and Society portion of the bulletin for details. At least one humanities and social sciences elective must be a 3xxx/4xxx level course. At least one humanities and social sciences elective must be a writing-intensive course, labeled by “W.”


2 Credits Introduction to Civil Engineering CE-UY1002
This course introduces the student to the profession and practice of civil engineering. The course has four primary components: (1) a review of the principal subdisciplines of civil engineering and their relationship to urban and regional infrastructure; (2) a review of professional ethics and the responsibilities of engineers to their profession and to the general public, which includes a detailed study and discussion of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) codes of practice, and the use of case studies for illustration and discussion; (3) the use of AutoCAD as a tool for computer-based drawings, and the use of spreadsheets to develop analytic algorithms to solve simple engineering problems; and (4) an introduction to the use of GIS. The course includes a laboratory on the use of AutoCAD, as well as on GIS. Each laboratory is 6-7 weeks long.
Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.
3 Credits Statics CE-UY2113
The course covers: Vector treatment of static and dynamic equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; equivalent forces and couple systems; distributed forces; static analysis of determinate trusses, frames and machines; friction; centroid and center of gravity, and moment of inertia.
Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 or equivalent (C or better).
3 Credits Mechanics of Materials CE-UY2123
This course introduces basic principles of stress and strain in axial loading, shear, torsion and bending, along with principles of transformation of stress for design. Laboratory experiments provide hands-on experience.

Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and CE-UY 2113 (C or better) or equivalents.
3 Credits Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics CE-UY2213
The course examines the basic principles of fluid mechanics with beginning applications to hydraulic design. Topics include fluid properties, fluid statics, elementary fluid dynamics and Bernoulli equation, continuity, energy and momentum equations, and fluid kinematics. Additional topics are laminar
and turbulent flow, boundary layer characteristics, drag and lift concepts (flow over immersed bodies), dimensional analysis, and fluid measurements.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2113 or equivalent.
3 Credits Transportation Engineering CE-UY2343
This course provides an introduction to transportation engineering. The course will cover travel demand forecasting, road user and vehicle characteristics, traffic engineering studies, engineering economic analysis, and highway design. The highway design element will focus on the basic design concepts of horizontal and vertical alignment, superelevation, and cross-section design. The course will also cover flexible pavement design, design of parking facilities, as well as bikeway and walkway design.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of Civil Engineering Program Advisor
2 Credits Structural Dynamics CE-UY3122
The course covers: Three-dimensional treatment of the kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems; Newton’s law, work, energy, impulse and momentum; and an introduction to dynamics of one, two and multi-degree of freedom systems, with and without damping.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 2034 (or MA-UY 2012) and CE-UY 2113 or equivalents: Co-requisite: CE-UY 3133 or equivalent.
3 Credits Structural Analysis CE-UY3133
This course offers in-depth coverage of structural analysis techniques. Topics: analysis of statically determinate structures; deflection calculations using energy methods; analysis of statically indeterminate structures using superposition; influence lines; and slope deflection, moment distribution and matrix analysis of structures. Computer applications are included.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: MA-UY 2034; and CE-UY 2123 or CE-UY 2113 with a grade of B+ or better.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-AD 116 and MATH-AD 121; and ENGR-AD 237 or ENGR-AD 111.
3 Credits Geotechnical Engineering CE-UY3153
The course covers: Introduction to soil mechanics and foundation engineering, including origin of soils; phase relationships; classification of soils; permeability; effective stress; seepage; consolidation; shear strength; slope stability; and bearing capacity.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 2123 and CE-UY 2213 or equivalents.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 237 and ENGR-AD 231.
1 Credits Materials Engineering Laboratory CE-UY3161
This laboratory course consists of a series of experiments to test various engineering properties of common civil engineering materials including metals, aggregates, concrete, timber, and polymer composites.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2123 or equivalent.
2 Credits Materials Engineering CE-UY3162
This course covers all commonly used civil engineering materials: metals, concrete, masonry, timber, asphalt, and polymer composites. It emphasizes fundamental materials science, production and processing, engineering properties, chemical durability, and practical applications. Materials sustainability and latest development in innovative materials and technology are also covered.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2123 or equivalent.
3 Credits Structural Design CE-UY3173
This course covers steel and reinforced concrete structural design principles and practices, including: reinforced concrete beams, columns, slabs and footings, steel tension, compression and flexural members, beam-columns, and bolted connections.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 3133
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 336
3 Credits Environmental Engineering I CE-UY3223
The course introduces water and wastewater treatment. Topics: Stream assimilation and public health; introduction to air pollution and solid waste management; and laboratory analysis of water and wastewater samples and treatment process tests.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: PH-UY 2033 and CE-UY 2213 or equivalents.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 231 and permission of department.
3 Credits Water Resource Engineering CE-UY3243
This course provides a detailed overview of water resources engineering, including both analysis and design elements. Topics covered: open-channel flow; pipe networks; reservoir balances; hydrologic techniques; surface water and ground-water supplies; water demand; and development of water resources for multiple purposes.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: MA-UY 2224 and CE-UY 2213 or equivalent.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 231 and permission of department.
2 Credits Leadership, Business Principles, Policy and Ethics in Civil Engineering CE-UY4092
This course is in seminar form and is required of all senior students in Civil Engineering. It focuses on various aspect of professional practice in civil engineering, and it augments and enriches the student’s educational experience, including the capstone design course. Topics include professional roles and responsibilities, professional registration and its importance, continuing education, engineering ethics, procurement of work, competitive bidding, quality-based selection processes, and construction management. Students are also introduced to the design and construction processes used by federal, state, and local agencies, as well as private owners. The course includes a no-credit recitation that prepares students for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination, which Civil Engineering students must take before graduation.
Prerequisite: Senior Status or permission of instructor.
3 Credits Structural Design Project CE-UY4153
This course covers the modeling, analysis and design of a steel or concrete building structure. Fundamental concepts of structural analysis and design are reinforced and applied. Computer-aided structural analysis and design software is introduced and utilized as in professional practice. Students may work individually or in groups to prepare interim and final reports.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 3173
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 337 and ENGR-AD 338.
2 Credits Civil Engineering Design I: Site Planning and Design CE-UY4812
This is the first part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers. Each year a specific project will created. Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project. Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester. The first semester focuses on site planning and design issues. The main facility will be located on the site, and all site issues addressed: grading and earthwork, traffic access and parking, water supply and sewage disposal, power supply and related issues.
Prerequisites: 1) CE-UY 3173; 2) CE-UY 2343 or CE-UY 3303 (or equivalent) or CE-UY 3343; 3) CE-UY 3243; and 4) CE-UY 3153
2 Credits Civil Engineering Design Ii: Structural Design CE-UY4822
This is the second part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers. Each year a specific project will created. Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project. Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester. The second semester focuses on structural design and related issues.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 4153; Corequisite: CE-UY 4812 (with advisor's consent)

  Construction Management and Engineering Electives*                 6 Credits

  Civil Engineering Electives*                                                             6 Credits

  Construction Management and Engineering or                             3 Credits
  Civil Engineering Elective* 

  Transportation Engineering Elective*                                             3 Credits

 *See approved construction management and engineering and civil engineering electives listed below


  Free Elective                                                                                      3 Credits 

A free elective is any course in any department of the University for which the student has the prerequisites.


Construction Management and Engineering Electives

2 Credits Leadership & Foundations of Construction Management CE-UY1502
This course introduces the student to the profession of construction management. It focuses on the role of the construction manager and the fundamental concepts and terminology employed in planning, developing and constructing projects. Leadership, professional development, ethics and safety are emphasized.
4 Credits Construction Modeling and Data Structures I CE-UY2504
This course introduces architectural drafting and computer graphics. It capitalizes on state-of-the-art computer applications in managing construction. The course familiarizes the student with two-dimensional construction drawings that represent the current industry standard, and it propels the student towards the future by teaching the basics of three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling. This course also introduces the use of the 3-D model with associated databases to manage construction.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1502 or CE-UY 1002 or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor
3 Credits Construction Materials & Methods CE-UY2513
This course introduces students to traditional and emerging materials and methods employed in building and civil infrastructure projects. The course will also address safety, regulation, constructability and sustainability from planning through design and construction.
Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502 or CE-UY 1002 or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor
3 Credits Contracts & Construction Documents CE-UY2523
This course covers the documents used in design and construction, including design and construction agreements, drawings and specifications, general and special conditions and others used for procurement and construction administration. The course also examines the relationships among the owner,
designers, contractors and suppliers. Students have the opportunity to discuss quality, safety and business and professional ethics.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1502 or CE-UY 1002 or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
3 Credits Cost Estimating CE-UY3503
Students learn the classification of work, quantity surveying techniques and basic estimating principles applied to construction projects. Also addressed are contracts; specifications and other construction documents; and the identification and allocation of direct and indirect project costs, overhead and profit. Students are introduced to computer-based estimating techniques and software.
Prerequisite: CE-UY1502 or CE-UY 1002 or permission of instructor.
3 Credits Construction Scheduling CE-UY3513
Students learn to apply the Critical Path Method (CPM) to construction projects, using precedence diagram networks. The course covers sequencing, cost allocation, updating, cash flow, resource constraints and scheduling, manpower leveling and distribution, time-scale networks, lead and lag-time constraints, time-cost tradeoffs, overlap and other specific leading edge scheduling techniques. Students direct an entire project from planning through scheduling and control, both manually and through software.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1002 or 1502.
3 Credits Construction Site Layout & Surveying CE-UY3533
This course studies the practical applications of surveying and its relationship to site planning and design. The first portion of the course concentrates on land surveying concepts, including mathematics, horizontal and vertical control, and angle measurement. The second portion of the course applies surveying data to site layout using traverses, area computations, property surveys, topography, and construction layout for highway and building applications. This course also includes a field laboratory which introduces students to basic surveying practice, including the use of surveying equipment (wheels, tapes, levels, and theodolites), measurements theory and computation, data accuracy and precision, and the use of the field book to properly record data.
3 Credits Non-structural Building Systems CE-UY3553
This course introduces the students to mechanical, electrical and vertical transportation systems for buildings. It examines fundamental aspects of the design, procurement and construction of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), supply and sanitary plumbing, fire detection and suppression, high- and low-voltage electrical, security, elevator and escalator and building management systems.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
3 Credits Construction Modeling and Data Structures II CE-UY3563
This course is the continuation of the student's exploration of construction management through building information modeling (BIM). The student will apply their understanding of construction assemblies, trade scheduling and estimating through studies of a larger project. Emphasis will be placed on the student's ability to model complex assemblies while coordinating and scheduling multiple trades. This progressive approach incorporates the 3D model and the associated databases in the management of construction by developing unit pricing, detailed scheduling and procurement attributes associated with a design.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2504
3 Credits Construction Engineering CE-UY4503
This course covers engineering fundamentals and developing trends in the use of excavating and earth-moving equipment, trucks, pumps, drilling and blasting equipment and cranes. Also considered are shoring and bracing and other temporary site construction operations.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.
3 Credits Construction Project Administration CE-UY4513
This course examines the roles of the project participants in executing a construction project, focusing on delegating administrative duties and responsibilities and managing and coordinating the physical work and administrative control of project information and records. Students use computer-based project administration techniques and software.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 1502 or CE-UY 1002, and junior standing.
3 Credits Structural Building Systems CE-UY4523
This course introduces the general principles of loads on buildings and the design and analysis of conventional structural building systems in steel, concrete, wood and masonry. It also addresses the construction of such systems.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2124.
3 Credits Construction Law CE-UY4533
The course introduces students to areas of the law that they are likely to encounter in construction. Following an introduction to the legal system and form of legal analysis, areas addressed include contracts, procurement, scope definition, delays and acceleration, site conditions, warranties, termination, tort claims, dispute resolution and ethics.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Civil Engineering Electives

3 Credits Introduction to Urban Infrastructure Systems Management CE-UY4033
This course provides students with an overview of key issues involved in the planning, management, operations and maintenance of urban infrastructure systems, including transportation, water supply, power, communications and information systems. It includes elements of engineering and technology, management, economics, finance, regulatory and public policy that have an impact on the sustainable development of the urban environment. The course features several distinguished guest lecturers from infrastructure industries and public agencies who share significant case studies with students. The course includes a component on GIS, with a focus on how to collect, integrate and share spatial data in urban infrastructure management. Group projects are required.
3 Credits Sustainable Cities CE-UY4043
The course provides an overview of issues that need to be addressed to make a city sustainable, beginning with a definition of what is intended by the concept of sustainability and a discussion of what is the essence of a city. Students are asked to become familiar with the major challenges in making a city sustainable, and to provide, as part of their homework, a paper addressing a topic covered by the course through research and, where necessary, proposed solutions.
3 Credits Biosoma – Environmental Design of the City of the Future CE-UY4053
The goal of this course is to improve the engineering design of a city and its components. The course focuses on the city as an entity that concentrates living organisms, societal organizations and activities and machines, interacting with the environment both outside and inside the city. A number of essential questions about the future of cities will be examined, such as: (1) what does urbanization mean for the future of humankind in terms of resources, capabilities, ideologies and culture? (2) How can the design of cities affect their future? (3) What should be the role of the engineer? (4) How can the engineer of the future be prepared for that role? (5) What critical engineering interventions are needed to influence the future of today’s cities? Each student will select a project that deals with some aspects of the course and present its results to the class.
3 Credits Foundation Engineering CE-UY4173
The course introduces the development of foundation engineering, including: site exploration; soil sampling; interpretation of boring logs; bearing capacity of footings; settlement of structures; lateral earth pressure; design of retaining walls, braced excavations and sheet pile walls; and design of deep foundations.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 3153 or equivalent.
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 342.
3 Credits Timber and Masonry Structures CE-UY4193
The course covers: Properties and classification of structural lumber; design of timber connectors; design and construction of residential and industrial timber buildings; beams, frames, columns and trusses of sawn lumber and glued laminated construction; manufacture and properties of concrete masonry units; properties of mortar and grout; and design and construction of load-bearing, reinforced and unreinforced masonry structural elements.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 3143 or CE-UY 3173.
4 Credits Water Resource Engineering II CE-UY4253
This course covers feasibility-level planning and design for water resources projects, including water conveyance works; concrete dams and assorted waterways; pumping stations; and hydroelectric, irrigation, navigation and flood mitigation projects. Subjects considered: Layouts, dimensions and capacities of facilities; hydraulic and structural forces; and stability analysis.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 4243 or equivalent.
3 Credits Environmental Engineering II CE-UY4273
The course offers detailed coverage of water and wastewater treatment unit operations and includes a laboratory on processes and process design. Experiments are performed to evaluate laboratory-scale conventional water and waste treatment processes. Lectures cover detailed theory, design and advanced concepts.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 2213 and CE-UY 3223 or equivalents.

 

Transportation Engineering Electives

3 Credits Introduction to Transportation Systems CE-UY3313
This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual elements of transportation systems and describes the approaches used to analyze and design transportation systems. The course covers the basic material about transportation systems, the context within which they operate and a characterization of their behavior.
Prerequisite: Junior status.
3 Credits Traffic Engineering CE-UY3303
This course covers the fundamentals of traffic engineering. The characteristics of traffic streams, and how they are quantitatively described is included. The course covers an overview of traffic control and operations, including the timing and design of pre-timed and actuated signals. An introduction to highway capacity and level of service analysis is included, and the analysis of basic freeway segments and multilane highways is covered as an example of this type of analysis.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
3 Credits Transportation Systems and Software CE-UY3333
This course covers transportation software and its applications in understanding the impacts of traffic demand on the transportation system. Simulation software will be used to test the impacts of various signal timings and progressions on an arterial and a network. Fundamental concepts of signal coordination and progression will be treated. The Highway Capacity Software (HCS) package will be used to examine the effects of traffic on individual intersection delay and level of service.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
3 Credits History of New York City Transit System CE-UY3353
This course traces the technological history of public transportation in New York City and investigates its role in the development of the city, its economy and its social fabric. From the early days of horse-drawn public carriages to the modern subway system, the role of the public transit in the historical development patterns of New York City is treated. The course covers trolley systems, the age of the elevated railways and the subway system. Political, social and economic issues involved in the development of these critical infrastructures are discussed. Students develop independent project reports on aspects of the NYC public transit system, or on public-transit systems in other major world cities.
Prerequisites: Junior Status or permission of instructor
3 Credits Transportation Economics CE-UY3363
This course introduces the principles of engineering economic analysis and applies them to the analysis of transportation alternatives. The cost elements of transportation systems are presented and discussed. The course also reviews existing measures and legislation that provide funding for transportation projects, and discusses potential new approaches for the future.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Note:

Additional electives for CE undergraduates are available from courses in the Construction Management curriculum. Consult the Construction Management section of the catalog.


Sample Course Schedule

Fall Semester (16 Credits)

4 Credits Calculus I for Engineers MA-UY1024
This course covers: Library of Functions, functions of one variable. Limits, derivatives of functions defined by graphs, tables and formulas, differentiation rules for power, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, derivatives of trigonometric functions, the product and quotient rules, the chain rule, applications of the chain rule, maxima and minima, optimization. The definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and interpretations, theorems about definite integrals, anti-derivatives. MA-UY 1324 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1024 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1324 covers the same material as MA-UY 1024 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (with a grade of B or better). Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits General Chemistry for Engineers CM-UY1004
This is a one-semester introductory course in general chemistry. It covers chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, gases, atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, organic, inorganic and polymeric materials and electrochemistry.
Corequisite: EX-UY 1
EXPOS-UA1 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
3 Credits Introduction to Engineering and Design EG-UY1003
This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation and data analysis, a team design project and analysis and presentation of engineering data and designs.

Spring Semester (16 Credits)

4 Credits Calculus II for Engineers MA-UY1124
This course covers techniques of integration, introduction to ordinary differential equations, improper integrals, numerical methods of integration, applications of integration, sequences, series, power series, approximations of functions via Taylor polynomials, Taylor series, functions of two variables, graphs of functions of two variables, contour diagrams, linear functions, functions of three variables. MA-UY 1424 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1124 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1424 covers the same material as MA-UY 1124 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1022 (with a grade of B or better) or MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 (with a grade of B or better).
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
3 Credits Mechanics PH-UY1013
This course is the first of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Motion of particles and systems of particles. One-dimensional motion. Vectors and two-dimensional motions. Forces and acceleration. Conservation of energy and momentum. Rotations. The free and driven harmonic oscillator. Gravitation. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or an approved equivalent. Corequisites: MA-UY 1124 or approved equivalent, and EX-UY 1
EXPOS-UA2 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
3 Credits Engineering Problem Solving and Programming CS-UY1133
This introductory course in engineering problem solving and computer programming is for all undergraduate engineering students without prior programming experience in any language. The course covers the fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the MATLAB programming language. Concepts and methods are illustrated by examples from various engineering disciplines. Useful numerical techniques and their applications to real-world problems in science and engineering are also discussed. ABET competencies: a, e, k.
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
2 Credits Introduction to Civil Engineering CE-UY1002
This course introduces the student to the profession and practice of civil engineering. The course has four primary components: (1) a review of the principal subdisciplines of civil engineering and their relationship to urban and regional infrastructure; (2) a review of professional ethics and the responsibilities of engineers to their profession and to the general public, which includes a detailed study and discussion of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) codes of practice, and the use of case studies for illustration and discussion; (3) the use of AutoCAD as a tool for computer-based drawings, and the use of spreadsheets to develop analytic algorithms to solve simple engineering problems; and (4) an introduction to the use of GIS. The course includes a laboratory on the use of AutoCAD, as well as on GIS. Each laboratory is 6-7 weeks long.
Prerequisite: Only first-year students are permitted to enroll in this introductory level course.


Fall Semester (18 Credits)

4 Credits Linear Algebra and Differential Equations MA-UY2034
MA-UY 2034 is an introduction to ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. The course develops the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that are widely used in modern engineering and science. Linear algebra is used as a tool for solving systems of linear equations as well as for understanding the structure of solutions to linear (systems) of differential equations. Topics covered include the fundamental concepts of linear algebra such as Gaussian elimination, matrix theory, linear transformations, vector spaces, subspaces, basis, eigenvectors, eigenvalues and the diagonalization of matrices, as well as the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that commonly appear in modern engineering and science.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3083 or MA-UY 4204.
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory I PH-UY2121
PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I (0.5:1:0:1). An introductory level experimental course. Fundamental laboratory experiments in classical mechanics and electrostatics. Stresses basic experimental techniques, error analysis, and written presentation of experiment results. Experiments require progressively more detailed and sophisticated analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2023.
3 Credits Electricity, Magnetism, & Fluids PH-UY2023
This is the second course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Fluids at rest and in motion. An introduction to electric and magnetic forces and fields. Electric charge density. Electric fields from simple charge distributions. Electric potential. Capacitance.
Magnetic forces. Magnetic field from a current loop. Inductance. Magnetism
in matter. Current and resistance. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or an approved equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I, and EX-UY 1
3 Credits Transportation Engineering CE-UY2343
This course provides an introduction to transportation engineering. The course will cover travel demand forecasting, road user and vehicle characteristics, traffic engineering studies, engineering economic analysis, and highway design. The highway design element will focus on the basic design concepts of horizontal and vertical alignment, superelevation, and cross-section design. The course will also cover flexible pavement design, design of parking facilities, as well as bikeway and walkway design.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of Civil Engineering Program Advisor
3 Credits Statics CE-UY2113
The course covers: Vector treatment of static and dynamic equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; equivalent forces and couple systems; distributed forces; static analysis of determinate trusses, frames and machines; friction; centroid and center of gravity, and moment of inertia.
Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 or equivalent (C or better).

  Humanities and Social Sciences Writing Intensive Elective          4 Credits

Spring Semester (17 Credits)

1 Credits General Physics Laboratory II PH-UY2131
PH 2131 General Physics Laboratory II (0.5:1:0:1). The second part of the introductory physics laboratory program. Fundamental laboratory experiments in E&M, waves, optics, and thermodynamics. Stresses experimental models and design, error and data analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Corequisite: PH-UY 2033
3 Credits Waves, Optics, & Thermodynamics PH-UY2033
This is the third course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Water, sound and electromagnetic waves. Reflection, scattering and absorption. Standing waves and spectra. Superposition, diffraction and beats. Geometrical optics. Introduction to thermodynamics; temperature, heat, and entropy. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Co-requisites: PH-UY 2131, and EX-UY 1.
3 Credits Mechanics of Materials CE-UY2123
This course introduces basic principles of stress and strain in axial loading, shear, torsion and bending, along with principles of transformation of stress for design. Laboratory experiments provide hands-on experience.

Prerequisite: PH-UY 1013 and CE-UY 2113 (C or better) or equivalents.
3 Credits Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics CE-UY2213
The course examines the basic principles of fluid mechanics with beginning applications to hydraulic design. Topics include fluid properties, fluid statics, elementary fluid dynamics and Bernoulli equation, continuity, energy and momentum equations, and fluid kinematics. Additional topics are laminar
and turbulent flow, boundary layer characteristics, drag and lift concepts (flow over immersed bodies), dimensional analysis, and fluid measurements.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2113 or equivalent.

  CE/Construction/TR Elective                                                           3 Credits 

  Humanities and Social Sciences Elective                                       4 Credits 


Fall Semester (15 Credits)

4 Credits Data Analysis MA-UY2224
An introductory course to probability and statistics. It affords the student some acquaintance with both probability and statistics in a single term. Topics in Probability include mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; the Central Limit Theorem and the normal approximation. Topics in Statistics include sampling distributions of sample mean and sample variance; normal, t-, and Chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; testing of hypotheses; least squares regression model. Applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data are integrated into the course.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2233 or MA-UY 3012 or MA-UY 3022.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY1424, or MA-UY 1132
3 Credits Structural Analysis CE-UY3133
This course offers in-depth coverage of structural analysis techniques. Topics: analysis of statically determinate structures; deflection calculations using energy methods; analysis of statically indeterminate structures using superposition; influence lines; and slope deflection, moment distribution and matrix analysis of structures. Computer applications are included.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: MA-UY 2034; and CE-UY 2123 or CE-UY 2113 with a grade of B+ or better.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: MATH-AD 116 and MATH-AD 121; and ENGR-AD 237 or ENGR-AD 111.
2 Credits Structural Dynamics CE-UY3122
The course covers: Three-dimensional treatment of the kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems; Newton’s law, work, energy, impulse and momentum; and an introduction to dynamics of one, two and multi-degree of freedom systems, with and without damping.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 2034 (or MA-UY 2012) and CE-UY 2113 or equivalents: Co-requisite: CE-UY 3133 or equivalent.
3 Credits Environmental Engineering I CE-UY3223
The course introduces water and wastewater treatment. Topics: Stream assimilation and public health; introduction to air pollution and solid waste management; and laboratory analysis of water and wastewater samples and treatment process tests.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: PH-UY 2033 and CE-UY 2213 or equivalents.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 231 and permission of department.

  Science Elective                                                                                3 Credits

Spring Semester (16 Credits)

3 Credits Geotechnical Engineering CE-UY3153
The course covers: Introduction to soil mechanics and foundation engineering, including origin of soils; phase relationships; classification of soils; permeability; effective stress; seepage; consolidation; shear strength; slope stability; and bearing capacity.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 2123 and CE-UY 2213 or equivalents.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 237 and ENGR-AD 231.
3 Credits Structural Design CE-UY3173
This course covers steel and reinforced concrete structural design principles and practices, including: reinforced concrete beams, columns, slabs and footings, steel tension, compression and flexural members, beam-columns, and bolted connections.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 3133
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 336
3 Credits Water Resource Engineering CE-UY3243
This course provides a detailed overview of water resources engineering, including both analysis and design elements. Topics covered: open-channel flow; pipe networks; reservoir balances; hydrologic techniques; surface water and ground-water supplies; water demand; and development of water resources for multiple purposes.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: MA-UY 2224 and CE-UY 2213 or equivalent.
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 231 and permission of department.

  CE/Construction/TR Elective                                                           3 Credits

  Humanities and Social Sciences Elective                                        4 Credits 


Fall Semester (16 Credits)

3 Credits Structural Design Project CE-UY4153
This course covers the modeling, analysis and design of a steel or concrete building structure. Fundamental concepts of structural analysis and design are reinforced and applied. Computer-aided structural analysis and design software is introduced and utilized as in professional practice. Students may work individually or in groups to prepare interim and final reports.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CE-UY 3173
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 337 and ENGR-AD 338.
2 Credits Leadership, Business Principles, Policy and Ethics in Civil Engineering CE-UY4092
This course is in seminar form and is required of all senior students in Civil Engineering. It focuses on various aspect of professional practice in civil engineering, and it augments and enriches the student’s educational experience, including the capstone design course. Topics include professional roles and responsibilities, professional registration and its importance, continuing education, engineering ethics, procurement of work, competitive bidding, quality-based selection processes, and construction management. Students are also introduced to the design and construction processes used by federal, state, and local agencies, as well as private owners. The course includes a no-credit recitation that prepares students for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination, which Civil Engineering students must take before graduation.
Prerequisite: Senior Status or permission of instructor.
2 Credits Civil Engineering Design I: Site Planning and Design CE-UY4812
This is the first part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers. Each year a specific project will created. Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project. Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester. The first semester focuses on site planning and design issues. The main facility will be located on the site, and all site issues addressed: grading and earthwork, traffic access and parking, water supply and sewage disposal, power supply and related issues.
Prerequisites: 1) CE-UY 3173; 2) CE-UY 2343 or CE-UY 3303 (or equivalent) or CE-UY 3343; 3) CE-UY 3243; and 4) CE-UY 3153

  Two (2) CE/Construction/TR Elective                                            6 Credits 

  Free Elective                                                                                    3 Credits

Spring Semester (15 Credits)

2 Credits Civil Engineering Design Ii: Structural Design CE-UY4822
This is the second part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers. Each year a specific project will created. Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project. Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester. The second semester focuses on structural design and related issues.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 4153; Corequisite: CE-UY 4812 (with advisor's consent)
2 Credits Materials Engineering CE-UY3162
This course covers all commonly used civil engineering materials: metals, concrete, masonry, timber, asphalt, and polymer composites. It emphasizes fundamental materials science, production and processing, engineering properties, chemical durability, and practical applications. Materials sustainability and latest development in innovative materials and technology are also covered.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2123 or equivalent.
1 Credits Materials Engineering Laboratory CE-UY3161
This laboratory course consists of a series of experiments to test various engineering properties of common civil engineering materials including metals, aggregates, concrete, timber, and polymer composites.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 2123 or equivalent.

  Two (2) CE/Construction/TR Elective                                            6 Credits

  Humanities and Social Sciences Elective                                      4 Credits

 

Total credits required for graduation: 129