Business and Technology Management, BS

On Campus

Business and Technology Management

The School of Engineering's Bachelor of Science in Business and Technology Management (BTM) is oriented toward current and future high growth areas. The program acknowledges that modern business leaders must be deeply familiar with technology and innovation, and work in diverse venues. The BTM program will give the business leaders of tomorrow distinct advantages towards getting prosperous and satisfying careers.

The BTM degree will provide you with a relevant professional management education and effective approaches related to technology, entrepreneurship, and managing information and new information. The BTM program also offers rigorous training in the qualitative, quantitative, and innovative aspects of technology and innovation management. In short, BTM creatively fuses modern business administration with state-of-the-art technology management.

Management requires that the effective communication of ideas, so the BTM learning experience also emphasizes spoken and written presentations in individual, team, classroom, and field internship settings.

At the School of Engineering, not only will you learn in the classroom, but also through studying real-world cases, as well as active learning in the field.

Students completing BTM are qualified for a variety of positions—such as technology project leaders, technology entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, technology and IT analysts, consultants in professional-services firms, marketing and business-unit managers for new products and services, and a variety of other exciting roles.

Curriculum

The Business and Technology Management BS program requires 127 or 128 credits for graduation. To remain in good standing, you must satisfy the following requirements, in addition to the School of Engineering requirements for a minimum term and cumulative 2.0 GPA in all courses:

  • An average of C (2.0) or better in all MG courses
  • A course in which the grade of I is received may not be used to satisfy any prerequisites until the incomplete is resolved

  • 56 credits in management
  • 32 credits in courses in humanities and social sciences
  • 12 credits in courses in mathematics
  • 8 credits in “restricted” electives chosen from math, science, social sciences and humanities
  • 7 credits in science
  • 4 credits in computer science
  • 4 credits in a “technical” elective
  • 1 credit in the Engineering and Technology Forum
  • 3 or 4 credits Free Elective

See the Typical Course Schedule below for an example of what your schedule might look like as a student in the BTM program.

Currently, management courses for the BS in BTM are each 4 credits. This new curriculum accommodates 3-credit courses in humanities and social sciences, as well as 3-credit courses in the sciences.


You may focus your study in 1 of 2 areas of concentration, which focus on particular issues and strategies that apply to business and technology management:

  • Technology Innovation Strategy enables you to develop effective skills for conducting strategic analysis addressing marketing, logistics, channel, and operations management issues, as well as relevant best business practiced in the technological arena. In this concentration option, you will complete MG 3304 in your 6th semester and MG 4004 in your 7th semester.
  • Technology and Innovation in Finance will prepare you to understand financial theory and how firms use modern finance for strategic and tactical decision-making. In this concentration option, you will complete MG 3214 and MG 4204 in your 6th and 7th semesters.

If you earn a 3.6 GPA or better in MG courses through your junior year of study, you will qualify for an optional MG4904 BS Thesis in Business and Technology Management honors capstone. You are advised to meet with the BTM Program Director before completing you junior year if you qualify. (You are free to not elect this project sequence.)


Courses at other schools may or may not be granted transfer credit and require an evaluation of the content and level of material covered. Periodic reevaluation of courses at other institutions may lead to a variation in the number of credits granted from year-to-year. Thus, students completing the same program, but in different years, may receive different amounts of transfer credit. Transfer students must present their records for evaluation at least 2 weeks before the regular registration period for their first semester.


You may obtain an undergraduate minor in management by completing 14 credits of management courses with an overall GPA of at least 2.0 in the classes, one of which must be MG1002. Additionally, you must take at least 8 of the 14 credits at the School of Engineering.


BTM courses are numbered with the following schema:

  • The first digit of a course number corresponds to the year in which a BTM student would take the course (1 = freshman, etc.)
  • The second digit reflects the primary nature of the course material. Courses numbered with a second digit of “0” are focused primarily on processes in management

“1” are oriented toward organizational behavior

“2” are quantitative in nature

“3” describe a firm’s relationships with external forces

“4” study innovation

“5” are capstone courses

“6” are Internship and Service courses

Thus, MG 3304 Introduction to Supply Chain Management is a 4-credit junior-year course focusing on external relationships.


2 Credits Foundations of Management MG-UY1002
This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Major emphasis is on management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading.
4 Credits Management of Information Technology and Systems MG-UY2004
This course provides a foundation to understand the role and potential contributions of information technologies and systems in business organizations–what they are, how they affect the organization and its employees, and how they can make businesses more competitive and efficient. The course focuses on the current state of IT in organizations; challenges and strategic use of IT; IT infrastructure and architecture; building, implementing and managing IT applications; and emerging issues such as intelligent systems, business-process reengineering, knowledge management and group-support systems.
4 Credits Operations Management MG-UY2014
A firm has the opportunity to create competitive advantage through proficient operations management. To do so, the firm first must recognize and establish the strategic role of its operations within the organization. Then, at the more detailed operational level, the firm must execute effectively and efficiently. This course examines the strategic role that the operations function can play and offers specific tools and techniques that a firm can use during implementation.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent.
4 Credits Organizational Behavior MG-UY2104
This course focuses on the study of human behavior in innovative organizations. Emphasis is on teams, leadership, communication theory and organizational culture and structure. The course includes analyses of organizational behavior problems through case studies and participation in experiential learning.
4 Credits Financial Accounting MG-UY2204
This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.
4 Credits Marketing MG-UY2304
This course is an undergraduate introduction to marketing. It discusses the fundamentals of marketing; e.g., the marketing mix, the role of the customer, marketing research and survey techniques. In addition, emerging marketing paradigms, like relationship marketing and online marketing, are introduced.
2 Credits Project Management MG-UY3002
This course provides students with practical and best-practice project management theory, concepts and (hands-on) practical experience so that they may contribute effectively to and lead multicultural team projects framed for the new global economy. The practical component includes a team-based project that spans the duration of the course.
4 Credits Management of Data Communications and Networking MG-UY3024
This course introduces the fundamentals of modern telecommunications and networking such as components of data communication, data transmission, open-system interconnection (OSI), TCP/IP and other models, data link and network layers and local area networks (LANs). The course focuses on managerial issues related to the management of data communications and networking technologies.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MG-UY 2004.
4 Credits Introduction to Finance MG-UY3204
This course introduces business finance for BTM majors. It emphasizes the financing and investment decisions of the financial manager, with special emphasis on examples from technological environments. Included are topics such as time value of money, asset valuation, risk analysis, financial statement analysis and capital budgeting.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MG-UY 2204.
4 Credits Advanced Corporate Finance MG-UY3214
This course builds on the principles of basic corporate finance covered in MG-UY 3204. It prepares students to understand financial theory and how firms use modern finance for strategic and tactical decision-making. The critical issue of how these decisions affect the value of a firm and the returns of assets is addressed. Major topics include bond valuation, the CAPM model, portfolio design and modeling and option pricing using the Black-Scholes model. A strong emphasis is placed on using spreadsheets as a financial-modeling tool.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MG-UY 3204.
4 Credits Introduction to Supply Chain Management MG-UY3304
This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to supply-chain management. The underlying objective is to introduce key supply-chain management concepts and examine relevant business practice. This course enables students to develop useful skills, in an increasingly global context, to analyze marketing, logistics, operations and channel-management issues.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 2004, MG-UY 2304 and MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2212 with MA-UY 2222.
4 Credits Innovation Management MG-UY3404
This course examines the key managerial features of technology-enabled innovation and new product development. It focuses on accessing innovative capabilities through R&D, acquisition, alliances, joint ventures and innovation-friendly cultures and organizations. The key perspective underlying this course is managerial. Although the innovation activities studied are overwhelmingly technology-enabled ones, success is largely determined by managerial factors. The interplay between the technology and management leading to innovation is a major concern of the discussion and work in this course.
Prerequisite: Junior student status.
4 Credits Management Strategy in Technology Sectors MG-UY4004
This course provides an overview of the process of implementing a successful management strategy in an information-, technology- and knowledge-intensive environment. Fundamental topics include the development of strategic vision, objectives and plans; implementation of strategy and the evaluation of performance; industry and competitive analysis; SWOT analysis and competitive advantage and sustained advantage. Advanced concepts include strategic positioning in global markets, Internet strategy, strategy in diversified firms, and interactions between organizational structure and strategy and between ethics and strategy.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 3204 and MG-UY 3404.
4 Credits Introduction to E-business MG-UY4014
Since its introduction, the Internet has changed how businesses work. In addition to creating new opportunities, the Internet has revolutionized existing businesses and entire industries. This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to e-business. The main objectives of this course are to (1) provide a hands-on introduction to the emerging area of e-Business, (2) discuss the major business concepts and issues in this domain and (3) develop high-quality content based on team discussion and individual/group research.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 3204, MG-UY 3002, MG-UY 3304/MG-UY 3214 and MG-UY 3404.
4 Credits Management Science MG-UY4204
This course teaches students to create mathematical models of managerial problems. Types of models discussed include linear programming, integer-linear programming, non-linear programming, queuing models, decision-tree models, game-theoretic models, simulation models, inventory models and more. Each model is discussed in the context of the assumptions necessary for modeling and the robustness of the model’s managerial recommendations.
Prerequisites: 8 credits of calculus: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2212 and MA-UY 2222.
4 Credits Financial Strategy MG-UY4214
This course deals with the financial strategy of modern firms. Topics include planning and implementation of financial strategies for start-up businesses and the utilization of venture capital; diverse issues related to designing financial strategies of rapidly growing companies after experiencing an IPO; challenges in constructing a financial strategy while undergoing a major corporate restructuring; key components of financial strategies for companies facing rapidly changing technological and competitive environments; and development of financial strategies for mature companies and declining business.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 2204, MG-UY 3204 and MG-UY 3214.
4 Credits Entrepreneurship MG-UY4404
This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.
4 Credits Special Topics in Management MG-UY4114
3 Credits Special Topics in Management MG-UY4113
2 Credits Special Topics in Management MG-UY4112
1 Credits Special Topics in Management MG-UY4111
4 Credits Global Perspectives On Technology Management: A Capstone Project Course MG-UY4504
This course provides students with knowledge of current theories and practices related to managing international and multinational firms. Students study the ways in which international management differs from the management of a firm residing solely within domestic boundaries. Topics covered include planning, organizing, HR management, communication and negotiation and coordination and control of international endeavors. Case studies are used extensively to focus the class on technological examples of problems in international management. Students undertake a term project that either (1) develops a business plan for a technological international venture, (2) creates a case study of a technological firm’s challenges in international management or (3) analyzes an technological industry’s position vis-à-vis international management.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 3002, MG-UY 3024, MG-UY 3204, MG-UY 3404, and MG-UY 3214 or MG-UY 3304.
4 Credits Honors Capstone Project in Tech, Innovation and/or Information Management & Entrepreneurship I MG-UY4514
In this course, qualified honors students work with a faculty member (and perhaps graduate students) on an advanced topic in technology, innovation and/or information management or entrepreneurship. This effort may be directed toward developing theory, developing case material, or developing a business plan and business strategy for a new venture, or another project of this caliber. A Thesis or Honor’s Thesis may compose part of this Honor’s Capstone course.
Prerequisites: senior status, 3.6 GPA or better through the junior year in major; all courses specified by the project adviser.
4 Credits Honors Capstone Project in Tech, Innovation and/or Information Management & Entrepreneurship II MG-UY4524
In this course, qualified honors students work with a faculty member (and perhaps graduate students) on an advanced topic in technology, innovation and/or information management or entrepreneurship. This effort may be directed toward developing theory, developing case material or developing a business plan and business strategy for a new venture, or another project of this caliber. A Thesis or Honor’s Thesis may compose part of this Honor’s Capstone course.
Prerequisites: senior status, 3.6 GPA or better through the junior year in major; all courses specified by the project adviser including MG-UY 4514.
3 Credits Technology Management—internship and Service MG-UY4603
This course provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to learn by working in the field under faculty supervision. This course exposes undergraduates to relevant, state-of-the-art and best practices in modern technology management from the perspective of reflective involvement and interaction in the field. In addition, a service often may be a significant part of this course. The course occurs largely in the field. This course may be taken only once. A member of the TM & I faculty oversees this course; but other faculty members may be involved in directing specific field assignments. This course is open to all BTM majors and requires the permission of the Program Director of the BTM Program.
4 Credits Bs Thesis in Business & Technology Management MG-UY4904
BTM students who earn an overall 3.0 GPA and a 3.4 GPA or better in technology management courses through their junior year of study qualify for an optional thesis. They are advised to meet with the TM & I Dept. Head or BTM Program Director in advance of completing their junior year. Before registering for the BTM Thesis, the student must find a Technology Management and Innovation Department faculty member agreeing to serve as thesis advisor and then receive the TM & I Dept. Head’s approval in writing before proceeding. BTM Thesis students are permitted to replace either the Honor's Capstone Project I MG-UY 4514 or Honor's Capstone Project II MG-UY 4524 with MG-UY 4904. This course cannot be repeated.


Sample Course Schedule

This schedule lists specific courses you are required to complete during your 4 years at the School of Engineering.

Grandfathering rules may apply.

Total credits required for graduation: 127 or 128


Fall Semester: 16 Credits

4 Credits Calculus I With Pre-calculus MA-UY1054 1a
This course covers limits, definition of the derivative, differentiation rules for polynomial and trigonometric functions, applications of the chain rule and introduction to optimization with a focus on Management and the Life Sciences.
Prerequisite: Placement exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 954 or equivalent. Note: Course required only for specific Majors in place of MA-UY 1024/1324. Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
EXPOS-UA1 Please refer to the bulletin for more information 2¬e=Humanities and Social Sciences 1
4 Credits Introduction to Programming & Problem Solving CS-UY1114
This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors who have limited prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the
course are illustrated by examples from various disciplines. ABET competencies: a,b,c, e, f, g, k
Corequisite: EX-UY 1

Science Elective (1), 4 Credits*

Spring Semester: 14 Credits

4 Credits Calculus II With Pre-calculus MA-UY1154 1b
This course covers the first and second derivatives, optimization problems, antiderivatives, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, numerical methods of integration, applications of integration, introduction to differential equations, and introduction to series with a focus on Management and the Life Sciences.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1054. Note: Course required only for specific Majors in place of MA-UY 1124/1424. Corequisite: EX-UY 1
2 Credits Foundations of Management MG-UY1002
This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Major emphasis is on management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading.
1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
EXPOS-UA2 Please refer to the bulletin for more information 2¬e=Humanities and Social Sciences 2

Science Electice (2), 3 Credits*

* See Footnote 3


See Footnote 11

Fall Semester: 16 Credits

4 Credits Financial Accounting MG-UY2204
This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.
4 Credits Management of Information Technology and Systems MG-UY2004
This course provides a foundation to understand the role and potential contributions of information technologies and systems in business organizations–what they are, how they affect the organization and its employees, and how they can make businesses more competitive and efficient. The course focuses on the current state of IT in organizations; challenges and strategic use of IT; IT infrastructure and architecture; building, implementing and managing IT applications; and emerging issues such as intelligent systems, business-process reengineering, knowledge management and group-support systems.
4 Credits Organizational Behavior MG-UY2104
This course focuses on the study of human behavior in innovative organizations. Emphasis is on teams, leadership, communication theory and organizational culture and structure. The course includes analyses of organizational behavior problems through case studies and participation in experiential learning.

3.00 CreditsCAM/STS/SEG/TCS Cluster Elect (Humanities and Social Sciences 3)*

Spring Semester: 16 Credits

4 Credits Marketing MG-UY2304
This course is an undergraduate introduction to marketing. It discusses the fundamentals of marketing; e.g., the marketing mix, the role of the customer, marketing research and survey techniques. In addition, emerging marketing paradigms, like relationship marketing and online marketing, are introduced.
ECON-UA2 Please refer to the bulletin for more information 12¬e=Humanities and Social Sciences 4
4 Credits Operations Management MG-UY2014
A firm has the opportunity to create competitive advantage through proficient operations management. To do so, the firm first must recognize and establish the strategic role of its operations within the organization. Then, at the more detailed operational level, the firm must execute effectively and efficiently. This course examines the strategic role that the operations function can play and offers specific tools and techniques that a firm can use during implementation.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent.
4 Credits Applied Business Data Analysis I MA-UY2054 13
This course covers applications of theories of random phenomena to problems in business management. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling, measures of central value and dispersion, sampling distributions, statistical estimation and introduction to hypothesis testing. Use of statistical software is integrated with the previous topics; examples are drawn from problems in business decision-making. Applications to advanced statistical applications in business management. Emphasis is on application of concepts. Use of statistical software integrated with the previous topics.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1054 or equivalent. Note: Course required only for Management Majors. Credit for this course may not be used to satisfy the requirements for other majors.

*See Footnote 2


See Footnote 11

Fall Semester: 18 Credits

4 Credits Introduction to Finance MG-UY3204
This course introduces business finance for BTM majors. It emphasizes the financing and investment decisions of the financial manager, with special emphasis on examples from technological environments. Included are topics such as time value of money, asset valuation, risk analysis, financial statement analysis and capital budgeting.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MG-UY 2204.
4 Credits Management of Data Communications and Networking MG-UY3024
This course introduces the fundamentals of modern telecommunications and networking such as components of data communication, data transmission, open-system interconnection (OSI), TCP/IP and other models, data link and network layers and local area networks (LANs). The course focuses on managerial issues related to the management of data communications and networking technologies.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MG-UY 2004.
2 Credits Project Management MG-UY3002
This course provides students with practical and best-practice project management theory, concepts and (hands-on) practical experience so that they may contribute effectively to and lead multicultural team projects framed for the new global economy. The practical component includes a team-based project that spans the duration of the course.
4 Credits Ethics and Technology PL-UY2144 4¬e=Humanities and Social Sciences 5
This course considers how technology shapes and patterns—and is shaped and patterned by—human activities, from a moral point of view. This course focuses on how the technologically textured world changes human life, individually, socially and culturally, for better or worse. The course considers several views of technology and several ethical theories for evaluating technology. The course explains the structures of change and transformation and develops critical forms of thought, so that students can understand, evaluate, appreciate and criticize technological development.
Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements. Co-requisites: None. Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.

CreditsTechnical Elective, 4 Credits*

Spring Semester: 16 Credits

4 Credits Innovation Management MG-UY3404
This course examines the key managerial features of technology-enabled innovation and new product development. It focuses on accessing innovative capabilities through R&D, acquisition, alliances, joint ventures and innovation-friendly cultures and organizations. The key perspective underlying this course is managerial. Although the innovation activities studied are overwhelmingly technology-enabled ones, success is largely determined by managerial factors. The interplay between the technology and management leading to innovation is a major concern of the discussion and work in this course.
Prerequisite: Junior student status.
4 Credits Introduction to Supply Chain Management MG-UY3304 10¬e=For Strategy Concentration
This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to supply-chain management. The underlying objective is to introduce key supply-chain management concepts and examine relevant business practice. This course enables students to develop useful skills, in an increasingly global context, to analyze marketing, logistics, operations and channel-management issues.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 2004, MG-UY 2304 and MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2212 with MA-UY 2222.
4 Credits Advanced Corporate Finance MG-UY3214 10¬e=For Finance Concentration
This course builds on the principles of basic corporate finance covered in MG-UY 3204. It prepares students to understand financial theory and how firms use modern finance for strategic and tactical decision-making. The critical issue of how these decisions affect the value of a firm and the returns of assets is addressed. Major topics include bond valuation, the CAPM model, portfolio design and modeling and option pricing using the Black-Scholes model. A strong emphasis is placed on using spreadsheets as a financial-modeling tool.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MG-UY 3204.

Restricted Elective (1), 4 Credits**

CAM/STS/SEG/TCS Cluster Elect (Humanities and Social Sciences 6), 4 Credits***

*See Footnote 7

**See Footnote 5

***See Footnote 2


See Footnote 11

Fall Semester: 16 Credits

4 Credits Management Strategy in Technology Sectors MG-UY4004 10¬e=For Strategy Concentration
This course provides an overview of the process of implementing a successful management strategy in an information-, technology- and knowledge-intensive environment. Fundamental topics include the development of strategic vision, objectives and plans; implementation of strategy and the evaluation of performance; industry and competitive analysis; SWOT analysis and competitive advantage and sustained advantage. Advanced concepts include strategic positioning in global markets, Internet strategy, strategy in diversified firms, and interactions between organizational structure and strategy and between ethics and strategy.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 3204 and MG-UY 3404.
4 Credits Financial Strategy MG-UY4214 10¬e=For Finance Concentration
This course deals with the financial strategy of modern firms. Topics include planning and implementation of financial strategies for start-up businesses and the utilization of venture capital; diverse issues related to designing financial strategies of rapidly growing companies after experiencing an IPO; challenges in constructing a financial strategy while undergoing a major corporate restructuring; key components of financial strategies for companies facing rapidly changing technological and competitive environments; and development of financial strategies for mature companies and declining business.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 2204, MG-UY 3204 and MG-UY 3214.
4 Credits Entrepreneurship MG-UY4404 6
This course focuses on key aspects of entrepreneurship as a critical engine for innovation. It also treats entrepreneurship as a state of mind that is not limited to small firms. Students discuss current theories and practices related to starting and managing entrepreneurial enterprises, emphasizing firms in technology- , information- and knowledge-intensive environments. Particular attention is paid to the critical issues of (1) identifying opportunities that provide competitive advantage; (2) the development of a solid business plan; (3) the marketing of new ventures; (4) entrepreneurial business operations, including human-resource and process management; (5) ethical and social issues in entrepreneurial firms; and (6) financial management and fund raising for entrepreneurial firms.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior student status.

Restricted Elective (2), 4 Credits *

BTM Mandatory STS Cluster Elective** (Humanities and Social Sciences 7)***, 4 Credits

Spring Semester: 15 Credits

4 Credits Global Perspectives On Technology Management: A Capstone Project Course MG-UY4504
This course provides students with knowledge of current theories and practices related to managing international and multinational firms. Students study the ways in which international management differs from the management of a firm residing solely within domestic boundaries. Topics covered include planning, organizing, HR management, communication and negotiation and coordination and control of international endeavors. Case studies are used extensively to focus the class on technological examples of problems in international management. Students undertake a term project that either (1) develops a business plan for a technological international venture, (2) creates a case study of a technological firm’s challenges in international management or (3) analyzes an technological industry’s position vis-à-vis international management.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 3002, MG-UY 3024, MG-UY 3204, MG-UY 3404, and MG-UY 3214 or MG-UY 3304.
4 Credits Management Science MG-UY4204 6
This course teaches students to create mathematical models of managerial problems. Types of models discussed include linear programming, integer-linear programming, non-linear programming, queuing models, decision-tree models, game-theoretic models, simulation models, inventory models and more. Each model is discussed in the context of the assumptions necessary for modeling and the robustness of the model’s managerial recommendations.
Prerequisites: 8 credits of calculus: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2212 and MA-UY 2222.

Free Elective, 3 or 4 Credits †

CAM/STS/SEG/TCS Cluster Elect (Humanities and Social Sciences 8), 4 Credits

* See Footnote 5

** See Footnote 2

*** See Footnote 8

† See Footnote 9


1a) MA-UY 1054: Students who are placed through the Mathematics Placement Exam or by a Mathematics Advisor, into MA-UY 914 Pre-Calculus or MA-UY 954 Pre-Calculus, must successfully complete the course before progressing to MA-UY 1054 Calculus I with Pre-Calculus. A more advanced Calculus I course may be substituted only with written permission by a Mathematics Advisor.

1b) MA-UY 1154: MA-UY 1052 Calculus II with Pre-Calculus is no longer offered and is replaced with MA-UY 1154 Calculus II with Pre-Calculus. A more advanced Calculus II may be substituted only with written permission by a Mathematics Advisor.

2) EXPOS-UA 1, EXPOS-UA 2: Follow latest NYU Tandon School of Engineering & Expository Writing and TCS (HuSS) requirements as stated per the NYU Tandon School of Engineering bulletin.

3) Approved science electives are CM-UY 1004 or CM-UY 1014, BMS-UY 1004 and PH-UY 1013 or PH-UY 1213 . EG-UY 1001 and EG-UY 1003 are NOT an approved as science electives for BTM. Any science course replacement requires approval by the BSBTM Program Director.

4) PL-UY 2144 Ethics and Technology is mandatory for all BTM majors and counts toward HuSS credits.

5) Restricted Electives are courses in math, science, Humanities and Social Sciences (HuSS) ONLY. Computer Science courses may not be counted as Restricted Electives. Restricted elective HuSS courses follow the new 4-credit approved Humanities and Social Sciences electives.

6) MG-UY 4204, MG-UY 4404: Students with a 3.6 GPA or better in major at the end of junior year may substitute MG-UY 4514 Honors Capstone Project in Technology, Innovation and/or Information Management and Entrepreneurship I (4 credits) or the Bachelor’s Thesis in Management (4 credits and with permission by the Dept. Chair) for MG-UY 4404 Entrepreneurship . They may also substitute MG-UY 4524 Honors Capstone Project in Technology, Innovation and/or Information Management Or Entrepreneurship II (4 credits) or MG-UY 4904 BS Thesis in Business and Technology Management (4 credits and with permission by the Dept. Chair) in Management for MG-UY 4204 Management Science . The Bachelor’s Thesis in Management may take longer than 1 semester to complete and students must follow all thesis guidelines.

7) Technical Electives can be chosen from computer science, engineering, mathematics, chemistry, physics, bio-molecular sciences, digital media, and undergraduate finance courses from the Department of Financial Rask and Engineering. Technical Electives do not count towards the General Education requirements.

8) The TCS STS Cluster BTM Manadatory Technology Subset can ONLY be fulfilled by any ONE of the following 4cr TCS Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Society (STS) courses listed below (as writing (W) or non writing courses):

Please note that the above TCS electives may also be used as normal (BTM) HuSS electives.

9 A Free Elective is defined as any three or four credits course within NYU.

10) MG-UY 3214, MG-UY 3304, MG-UY 4004, MG-UY 4214: Students must select and remain in a BSBTM Concentration by the end of the fall semester of the Junior year. Current BS BTM Concentrations: Technology Innovation and Strategy Concentration (Strat Concen) & Technology and Innovation in Finance Concentration (Fin Concen).

11) Students may participate in an internship experience through CP-UY 2011 and/or CP-UY 2021 or MG-UY 4603 , for a maximum of 3 total internship related credits which will only count as a Free Elective.

12) ECON-UA 2: EC-UY 2524 Managerial Microeconomics is replaced by ECON-UA 2 Economic Principles II (Microeconomics).

13) MA-UY 2054: With written permission from the NYU Tandon Dept. of Mathematics, MA-UY 2054 Applied Data Analysis may be substituted with MA-UY 2224 Data Analysis.

14) Grandfathering rules may apply.

15) This chart is for incoming Fall 2014 BTM Freshmen and onwards.

Note: THIS CHART IS ALSO USED FOR ADVISEMENT AND BS BTM DEGREE REQUIREMENT AUDIT CHECKLIST. ALL INFORMATION IS SUBJECT TO REVISION.