Mechanical Engineering, MS

On Campus

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers create the physical systems and devices that define modern society — everything from automobiles to air conditioning, robots to power plants, people movers to artificial limbs, and rocket engines to satellites. At the School of Engineering, we groom our students to become the inventors and innovators of tomorrow, to jumpstart the next generation of entrepreneurial ventures. In short, we help them transform our philosophy of invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship — or i2e — into action.

The MS in Mechanical Engineering program is flexible enough for our students to pursue it as a terminal degree or as a stepping stone towards a PhD degree. Many enter such fields as computer engineering, nanotechnology, software development, and financial engineering. They also occupy positions in bioengineering, manufacturing, astronautics, systems engineering, and corporate management and law. Still others become leading stewards of the natural environment by advancing resource conservation, more efficient energy consuming devices, and new energy sources.

Admission Requirements

A bachelor’s degree and a good academic record in mechanical engineering from a reputable college or university are generally required for admission to this program. Applicants with degrees from fields other than mechanical engineering may be admitted but may have to complete additional studies to achieve a comparable background. Courses required to achieve this status are specified as part of the admission evaluation. Undergraduate courses specified for this purpose cannot count toward credits for the graduate degree. Graduate programs are subject to prior approval of a graduate adviser designated by the department.

Curriculum

To earn a Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree at the School of Engineering you must select a specialty in Mechanical Engineering and complete 30 credits as outlined in the specialty requirements below. 


3 Credits Applied Mathematics in Mechanical Engineering ME-GY6003
The course covers vector and tensor calculus. Topics: Ordinary differential equations. Laplace and Fourier Transforms. Sturm-Liouville problems. Partial differential equations. Applications to structural analysis, fluid mechanics and dynamical systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Thermal Engineering Fundamentals ME-GY6043
Presentation of basic scientific and engineering principles that all energy systems must satisfy, including thermodynamic, fluid mechanic and heat transfer principles that constrain or facilitate energy systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Introduction to Solid Mechanics ME-GY6213
The course explores fundamentals of kinematics of solid bodies; displacement and strain measures, introduction to statics of solid bodies, stress tensor, equilibrium equations. Topics include analysis of columns, beams and beams on elastic foundations.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Digital Control Systems ME-GY6603
The course introduces digital systems, signal conversion techniques, z-transform and inverse z-transform, transfer function and block diagrams, state-variable techniques, controllability, observability, stability and control design techniques.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
or
3 Credits Linear Control Theory and Design I ME-GY6703
The course covers modeling of mechanical systems (e.g., mechatronic, vibrational, robotic and smart systems) in state-space. Topics: Description and analysis of linear mechanical systems, transform and transition matrix methods and properties such as stability, controllability/stabilizability, observability/detectability.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval

 


Energy Engineering and Policy Specialty

In addition to the four courses in all specialty options the following three courses must be completed:

3 Credits Energy Conversion Systems ME-GY6813
This course provides description and analysis of current and future energy systems including fuel sources, energy harvesting, energy delivery to the point of conversion, energy conversion to heat or electricity, distribution to end users, basic economics of power plant and environmental impact. Security, reliability and life cycle cost considerations are reviewed and analyzed for impact on selecting the optimum energy systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Energy Policy, Regulations, and Incentives ME-GY6823
This course focuses on impact of local, state and national policy on energy choices. Regulatory limitations and incentives influencing energy options and economics. Quantitative trade off analyses of various technically feasible options when policies, regulations and incentives are considered. Environmental impact, positive as well as negative, of energy systems are analyzed. Costs of mitigating negative environmental impact are reviewed and their impact on the choice of a system is analyzed through case studies presented in term papers.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Energy Project Financing ME-GY6833
Analysis of current and projected fuel costs, capital costs, maintenance costs, operating and environmental costs, and infrastructure costs of various competing energy systems. A term project providing an in-depth analysis of one candidate system is required. Student teams present the results of their work advocating for their system. A panel of judges will decide which group makes the best case for its system.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6823

A minimum of two additional courses (6 credits) must be selected from

3 Credits Thermodynamics of Hvac Systems ME-GY6153
Principles of thermodynamics. Description of HVAC systems. Vapor compression and adsorption cycles. Heat pump cycles. Geothermal systems. Solar heating and cooling systems. Phychometric analysis for design and off-design conditions. Indoor environmental quality analysis. Green and sustainable systems.
Prerequisite: ME-UY 3333 or advisor approval
3 Credits Fluid Mechanics for Hvac Systems ME-GY6163
Fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Centrifugal pumps and system-pump characteristics. Piping systems fundamentals and design. Jets and air diffusers. Fans, fan performance, installation and testing. Duct sizing and design. Design of sprinkler systems.
Prerequisites: ME-UY 3313 or advisor approval
3 Credits Heat Transfer for Hvac Systems ME-GY6173
Fundamentals of heat transfer. Solar radiation fundamental. Heat transmission in buildings and space heat load calculations. Space cooling load calculations. Energy calculations; degree by day procedure, bin methods and building simulation methods. Energy modeling and conformance with NYS Code. Extended surface heat exchangers. LEED Score sheet and design for green buildings.
Prerequisite: ME-UY 4313 or advisor approval
3 Credits Design of Hvac Systems ME-GY6183
This course involves the dynamic and sustainable design process to perform a complete design of HVAC systems for a commercial or residential building using state of the art software and processes. Design schematic phase. Design development phase. Construction documents phase. Students work on specific project, design a system through all stages.
Prerequisite: ME-UY 4313 or advisor approval
3 Credits Convective Heat Transfer ME-GY7063
The course examines developments and applications of laminar hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layer equations for fluid media. Topics: Mechanics of turbulence; formulation and analysis of turbulent hydrodynamics and thermal applications; natural convection and film evaporation and condensation.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6043 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Radiative Heat Transfer ME-GY7083
This course covers fundamentals of radiative mechanisms of energy transfer. Topics: Definitions of basic qualities. Equations of transfer, radiative heat flux vector and conservation equations. Properties of surfaces and participating media. Applications to engineering systems.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6003 and ME-GY 6043 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Viscous Flow and Boundary Layers ME-GY7113
The course introduces molecular and macroscopic transport. Topics: Reynold’s transport theorem.Concepts of stress and strain and derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations. Similarity principle. Exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Low Reynolds number flows. Boundary layer theory. Momentum integral equation. Introduction to turbulence.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6003 and ME-GY 6043 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Compressible Flow ME-GY7133
The course examines fundamentals of compressible fluid flow, including subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic flows over two-dimensional and axisymmetric bodies. Topics: One-dimensional flows with friction and heat addition. Shock-wave development in both two-dimensional steady and one-dimensional unsteady flow systems, including flow in shock tubes. Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow, including flows in inlets, nozzles and diffusers. Introduction to numerical solution of compressible fluid flow.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6043 or adviser approval.

In addition one free elective may be taken to complete the 30 credit degree requirement.

Controls and Dynamic Systems Specialty

2 courses from:

3 Credits Mechatronics ME-GY5643
The course introduces theoretical and applied mechatronics, design and operation of mechatronics systems; mechanical, electrical, electronic and optoelectronic components; sensors and actuators, including signal conditioning and power electronics; microcontrollers, fundamentals, programming and interfacing; and feedback control. The course includes structured and term projects in designing and developing of prototype integrated mechatronic systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Microelectromechanical Systems ME-GY5653
The course covers materials for MEMS, fundamentalof solid mechanics, electrostatics and electromagnetics. Topics: Electromechanical modeling and design of micromachined sensors and actuators. Microscale physics of microsystems. Overview of MEMS applications. Packaging and testing.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Sensor Based Robotics ME-GY6613
Topics in this course include robot mechanisms, robot arm kinematics (direct and inverse kinematics), robot arm dynamics (Euler Lagrange, Newton-Euler and Hamiltonian Formulations), six degree-of-freedom rigid body kinematics and dynamics, quaternion, nonholonomic systems, trajectory planning, various sensors and actuators for robotic applications, end-effector mechanisms, force and moment analysis and introduction to control of robotic manipulators. Co-listed as ME-GY 5223
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval.
3 Credits Linear Control Theory and Design II ME-GY6713
The course considers fundamentals of system realizations and random processes. Topics: Performance objectives for mechanical systems (e.g., mechatronic, vibrational, robotic and smart systems). Optimal design of state feedback controllers, observers and output feedback controllers for mechanical systems.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6703 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Non-linear Systems: Analysis & Control ME-GY7613
The course introduces nonlinear phenomenon, behavior and analysis of second-order nonlinear systems, fundamental properties of solutions of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, Lyapunov stability theory, absolute stability theory, describing functions, dissipativity, advanced topics.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6003 and ME-GY 6713 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Co-operative Control ME-GY7623
The course examines fundamentals of set theory, metric spaces, linear spaces, matrix theory and differential equations. Topics: Lyapunov stability. Algebraic graph theory. Consensus theory. Linear switched systems. Stochastic convergence. Averaging methods. Synchronization problems. Applications to multivehicle robotic teams, epidemic spreading and opinion dynamics.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6003 and ME-GY 6703 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Optimal Robust Control ME-GY7703
The course looks at mathematical preliminaries, matrix theory fundamentals, linear system properties, stability theory, constrained optimization and performance characterization: deterministic/stochastic formulations, Lagrange multiplier versus linear-matrix-inequality formulation of linear quadratic regulation (LQR), state estimation and dynamic output feedback control problems, static output feedback, regulation versus tracking problems, robustness properties of LQR, on lack of robustness of LQG controllers, loop-transfer recovery, small-gain theorem, introduction to H-infinity and multi-objective robust control.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6703 or adviser approval.

ME xxxx Electives Approved by the Graduate Adviser, Credits: 6.00 total

Free Electives, Credits: 6.00 total

 

Mechanics and Structural Systems Specialty

2 courses from:

3 Credits Composite Materials ME-GY5243
This course introduces modern polymeric, metallic and ceramic composite materials, fabrication techniques, mechanical property characterization. Topics: Introduction to matrix and reinforcement materials, material selection and composite design criteria. Mechanics based analysis of continuous fiber reinforced unidirectional plies and woven fabrics. Applications of advanced composites in car, aircraft, construction and sports industries.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Vibrations ME-GY5443
The course looks at the dynamics of one-, two- and multi-degree of freedom systems with and without damping. Topics: Vibrations of distributed parameter systems: bars, beams and plates. Numerical methods. Introduction to nonlinear oscillations.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval
3 Credits Advanced Mechanics of Materials ME-GY6223
The course discusses two-dimensional stress and strain analysis, applications of energy methods, Reyleighitz method. Topics: Applications of energy methods to beams, frames, laminates and sandwich structures. Torsion of prismatic bars, open and closed thin-walled cylinders, unsymmetric bending and shear center, curved bars.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6213 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Mechanics of Non Materials ME-GY6253
The course introduces nanosized and nanoscale materials: nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods. Topics: Classical molecular dynamics, lattice mechanics, methods of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, introduction to multiple scale modeling and introduction to bridging scale. Characterization techniques for nanomaterials. Applications in nanosystems such as nanocars, nanobots and nanoelectronics.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval.
3 Credits Advanced Dynamics ME-GY6513
The course covers kinematics and dynamics of a particle in space. Topics: Systems of particles. Two-body central force problem. Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies. Euler’s equations. Euleragrange equations with holonomic and nonholonomic constraints. Stability analysis. Introduction to calculus of variations. Hamilton’s principle. Hamilton’s equations.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advisor approval.
3 Credits Advanced Manufacturing of Biomedical Devices ME-GY6843
This course aims to provide the essential knowledge in the biomedical product development (e.g. material properties, fabrication processes and design techniques for different applications) in order to provide ways to speed up the product development cycle. This course is multidisciplinary and covers the principles in its mechanical, chemical, biological, and physiological aspects. Students can learn the techniques for applying this acquired knowledge to particular applications in which they are interested.
Prerequisites: Knowledge in Material Science and Mechanics of Materials or equivalent
3 Credits Elasticity I ME-GY7213
The course looks at stress and strain tensors, generalized Hooke’s law. Topics: Formulation of elasticity problems. Plane stress and plane strain concepts; solution by complex variables; stress concentrations. Rotating Discs and cylinders of uniform thickness and variable thickness. Deformation symmetrical about an axis.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6213 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Advanced Composite Materials ME-GY7243
The course covers mechanics based analysis of fibrous (continuous and discontinuous) and particulate composites, generalized Hooke’s law for anisotropic and orthotropic materials. Topics: Stress strain transformations and failure criterion for anisotropic materials. Analysis of composite beams in tension, flexure and torsion. Analysis of composite shells and grid-stiffened structures.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 5243 and ME-GY 6213 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Failure Mechancis ME-GY7323
The course introduces fracture mechanics. Topics: Linear elastic, elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture mechanics modeling and design. Fatigue and design against fatigue failures. Standard fracture mechanics testing procedures and related material properties. Micromechanics of fracture. Dynamic fracture. Continuum damage mechanics.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6213 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Non-destructive Evaluation ME-GY7333
The course introduces various NDE techniques used in engineering applications, xray radiography, ultrasonic imaging, acoustic emission, optical interferometry, magnetic resonance imaging. Also introduced are embedded optical and electromechanical sensors for continuous health monitoring and defect detection.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6003 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Fracture Mechanics ME-GY7353
The course introduces fracture mechanics. Topics: Linear elastic, elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture mechanics modeling and design. Fatigue and design against fatigue failures. Standard fracture mechanics testing procedures and related material properties. Micromechanics of fracture. Dynamic fracture. Continuum damage mechanics.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 6213 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Advanced Vibrations ME-GY7443
This course reviews analytical dynamics and vibrations of lumped parameter systems. Topics: Vibrations of distributed parameter systems. Approximate solution methods. Introduction to nonlinear vibrations and analysis tools. Advanced topics.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 5443 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Elasticity II ME-GY8213
This class continues studies in elasticity problems. Topics: Three dimensional problems; St. Venant problems, extension, flexure, tension. Energy principles and variational methods; approximation techniques.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 7213 or adviser approval.
3 Credits Mechanics of Cellular Materials ME-GY8273
The course looks at structure of cellular composites and natural cellular materials, including single phase open and closed cell foams and two-phase closed cell foams. Topics: Mechanics of honeycombs and foams, mechanics of wood and bones, effect of density, cell size and cell periodicity, introduction to homogenization techniques for cellular composites.
Prerequisite: ME-GY 7213 or adviser approval.


  • To graduate, you must have a 3.0 GPA or better in each of the following:

    • In the average of all graduate courses taken at the School of Engineering (whether or not some of these courses are being used to satisfy specific degree requirements)
    • In the average of all courses submitted for the graduate degree
    • In each guided studies, readings, projects, thesis, courses, or credits enrolled
  • You must take at least 21 credits out of the 30 credits needed for the degree at the School of Engineering. In other words, 9 credits may be transferred from elsewhere.
  • No more than 6 credits in “Guided Reading” courses are allowed
  • Validation credit is not allowed, but the graduate adviser may waive specific requirements (and substitute designated ones), based upon your prior studies or experience
  • Transfer credits are not granted for the following:
    • Undergraduate courses
    • Courses counted toward satisfying undergraduate degree requirements
    • Courses not related to the graduate program as stated in this catalog
    • Courses that received a grade lower than B
  • You must complete your degree in 5 years, unless a formal leave of absence is approved before the period for which studies are interrupted
  • If you decide to do a ME-GY 996X Masters Project or ME-GY 997X Masters Thesis (9 credits) as part of your work for the degree, those 9 credits will be counted against 3 out of the 6 credits in ME electives, 3 out of the 6 credits in ME Required for the Specialty Area credits, and 3 out of the 6 credits of Free Electives. Formatting guidelines for the submission of a Master's Thesis or Project can be found by clicking here
  • You are not allowed to submit more than 3 courses (9 credits), starting with a 5 for MS degree requirements satisfaction
  • Departmental electives include courses with a mechanical (ME), aerospace (AE), or materials (MT) prefix, plus departmental thesis or project credits
  • All courses and program details are subject to adviser approval