Products of computer engineering touch nearly every part of our lives. They let us chat via webcams, send e-mails from cell phones, and withdraw cash from ATMs. But computer-based devices and information networks aren’t the only products computer engineers develop; they reconstruct genomes, design robots, and develop software to make businesses more efficient. That’s just the kind of invention, innovation, and entrepreneurship that the School of Engineering encourages.

Our BS program in Computer Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. The program has a comprehensive analysis and design curriculum that provides an outstanding, cutting-edge education in computer systems with emphasis on hardware and software, The program incorporates the latest market and technology trends and combines the traditional disciplines of electronics, communications, control and computer programming with newer courses, such as Cyber Security, Nanoscale Circuit Design, Parallel Computers, Image Processing, Biomedical Instrumentation, Web Search Engines, Wireless Networks, Peer-to-Peer Networks, SoC (System-on-a-Chip), VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) and Game Development.

Recognizing the need for well-rounded engineers, we also emphasize strong communication and interpersonal skills. Our students develop these skills not only through required courses in the humanities and social sciences but also during team projects in design classes. Sponsored research and affiliate programs at our Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications (CATT), and Offensive Security, Incident Response, and Internet Security Lab also put you in constant contact with alumni and instructors whose experience in the industry you can draw upon.

Graduates of our program have gone on to design microchips and computer graphics, monitor and control industrial plants, and develop embedded hardware/software systems. They also occupy positions in manufacturing, research, financial services, health, and government, or create their own companies.

With departmental permission, you may earn a single bachelor’s degree in electrical and computer engineering. This degree requires a minimum of 142 credits rather than the typical 128 required for individual bachelor’s degrees.

About the Program

The broad objectives of the Computer Engineering Program are:

  • Graduates are expected to be engaged and advancing in their professional careers in a profession that utilizes their NYU Tandon degree, in Computer Engineering or another career path, that include industry, academia, and governmental or non-governmental organizations.
  • Graduates are expected to be seeking continuous professional development and life-long learning through graduate school studies, continuing education credits and/or professional registration.

In order to prepare our students to meet these objectives after graduation the ECE department has adopted the ABET a-k criteria as the appropriate student outcomes that our curriculum is designed to foster in our students:

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

(e) an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems

(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) an ability to communicate effectively

(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice


You may obtain a minor in computer engineering by taking the following courses with a GPA of 2.0 or better.

EE-UY2013 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY2024 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
4 Credits Digital Logic and State Machine Design CS-UY2204
This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, c, e, k.
EE-UY4144 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

For students not earning the BS degree in computer science, EE 4144 may be replaced by CS 2214 Computer Architecture. You must take a minimum of 8 credits at the School of Engineering. Students for whom CS1133/CS1114 is not required for major should note that CS 1133/CS 1114 is a prerequisite for CS 2204. The minor in computer engineering is not open to students earning the BS degree in electrical engineering.


Curriculum

To obtain a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, you must complete 128 credits. A sample semester-by-semester look at your program can be found on the Sample Course Schedule below. 

In this section, you'll find:

  • Grade Requirements
  • Senior Design Project
  • Senior Thesis 

The Institute requires a 2.0 GPA in all courses and specifies other general requirements in the section “Undergraduate Academic Programs and Policies,” beginning on page 16 of the School of Engineering catalog which describes the core curriculum for all engineering majors, including placement procedures in writing, mathematics and programming; course credits by transfer and advanced placement; and credit by examination.

To graduate with a BS in Computer Engineering, you must:

1) Have a C-grade or better in:

4 Credits Introduction to Programming & Problem Solving CS-UY1114
This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors who have limited prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the
course are illustrated by examples from various disciplines. ABET competencies: a,b,c, e, f, g, k
Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Data Structures and Algorithms CS-UY1134
This course covers abstract data types and the implementation and use of standard data structures along with fundamental algorithms and the basics of algorithm analysis. Not open to students who have taken CS-UY 2134.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better); Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Object Oriented Programming CS-UY2124
This intermediate-level programming course teaches object-oriented programming in C++. Topics: Pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion. Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, methods (member functions) and data members. Access and the interface to relationships of classes including composition, association and inheritance. Polymorphism through function overloading operators. Inheritance and templates. Use of the standard template library containers and algorithms.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1134 (C- or better); Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Digital Logic and State Machine Design CS-UY2204
This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, c, e, k.
EE-UY2013 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY2024 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

2) Have a technical GPA of 2.0 based on all courses prefixed EE, CS or EL. Seniors may elect graduate courses labeled EL 5XX3, but not CS 5XX3. To enroll in other graduate courses, you must meet required department GPA standards and adviser approval.


The 2-semester Senior Design Project allows you to focus on an application of computer engineering. In the first semester, you and your classmates will concentrate on hardware and/or software. You will develop skills using specialized laboratory equipment and computer-design packages and will be introduced to techniques for planning projects and making effective presentations. You will learn to balance design requirements such as performance, safety, reliability, and cost effectiveness.

In the second and final semester, you will design, build or simulate, and test a device or system to meet prescribed engineering specifications.


If as an undergraduate computer engineering student you wish to do a Senior Thesis (BS thesis) instead of Design Project (DP), you must:

  • Complete 6 total credits of EE 397
  • Complete EE 4001
  • Make a presentation to your thesis adviser, with attendance open to other students and faculty; and
  • Bind your thesis according to Institute guidelines for MS and PhD theses.

Note: For the thesis, you do need not register for Design Project I or Design Project II. Before registering for Senior Thesis, you must find a faculty member to serve as thesis adviser. In addition, you must have a 3.0 GPA in order to register for Senior Thesis instead of Design Project.

Additional notes:

  • The Senior Thesis must be design oriented
  • The 6 credits of DP-1 and DP-2 are replaced by 6 credits of Senior Thesis (EE 397)
  • You are advised not to take all 6 credits of Senior Thesis during a single semester

Typical Course Schedule

This schedule lists specific courses you might take as you work towards your bachelor's in computer engineering. 128 credits are required to complete the degree for students beginning Fall 2016 or later. Following the schedule are Important Notes that you should review as they are important elements of your course of study.

If there is not a link supplied with a course number, please consult the Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin.


Fall Semester

4 Credits Calculus I for Engineers MA-UY1024
This course covers: Library of Functions, functions of one variable. Limits, derivatives of functions defined by graphs, tables and formulas, differentiation rules for power, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, derivatives of trigonometric functions, the product and quotient rules, the chain rule, applications of the chain rule, maxima and minima, optimization. The definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and interpretations, theorems about definite integrals, anti-derivatives. MA-UY 1324 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1024 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1324 covers the same material as MA-UY 1024 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (with a grade of B or better). Corequisite: EX-UY 1
3 Credits Introduction to Engineering and Design EG-UY1003
This course introduces selected aspects of the history, philosophy, methodology, tools and contemporary topics in engineering. Also included are basic engineering experimentation and data analysis, a team design project and analysis and presentation of engineering data and designs.
1 Credits Engineering and Technology Forum EG-UY1001
In this course the notion of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship (i2e) is introduced to the students’ educational experience. Students will be exposed to elements of a research-intensive institution and diverse research performed by leading engineers, scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs.
4 Credits Introduction to Programming & Problem Solving CS-UY1114
This course introduces problem solving and computer programming and is for undergraduate Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors who have limited prior experience in programming in any language. The course covers fundamentals of computer programming and its underlying principles using the Python programming language. Concepts and methods introduced in the
course are illustrated by examples from various disciplines. ABET competencies: a,b,c, e, f, g, k
Corequisite: EX-UY 1
EXPOS-UA1 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Total: 16 credits

Spring Semester

4 Credits Calculus II for Engineers MA-UY1124
This course covers techniques of integration, introduction to ordinary differential equations, improper integrals, numerical methods of integration, applications of integration, sequences, series, power series, approximations of functions via Taylor polynomials, Taylor series, functions of two variables, graphs of functions of two variables, contour diagrams, linear functions, functions of three variables. MA-UY 1424 is for students who wish to take MA-UY 1124 but need more review of precalculus. MA-UY 1424 covers the same material as MA-UY 1124 but with more contact hours per week, incorporating a full discussion of the required precalculus topics.
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1022 (with a grade of B or better) or MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1324 (with a grade of B or better).
Corequisite: EX-UY 1.
3 Credits Mechanics PH-UY1013
This course is the first of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Motion of particles and systems of particles. One-dimensional motion. Vectors and two-dimensional motions. Forces and acceleration. Conservation of energy and momentum. Rotations. The free and driven harmonic oscillator. Gravitation. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: MA-UY 1024 or an approved equivalent. Corequisites: MA-UY 1124 or approved equivalent, and EX-UY 1
4 Credits Data Structures and Algorithms CS-UY1134
This course covers abstract data types and the implementation and use of standard data structures along with fundamental algorithms and the basics of algorithm analysis. Not open to students who have taken CS-UY 2134.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better); Corequisite: EX-UY 1
EXPOS-UA2 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY1012 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

OR 

CS-UY1012 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Total: 17 credits

 


Fall Semester

4 Credits Linear Algebra and Differential Equations MA-UY2034
MA-UY 2034 is an introduction to ordinary differential equations and linear algebra. The course develops the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that are widely used in modern engineering and science. Linear algebra is used as a tool for solving systems of linear equations as well as for understanding the structure of solutions to linear (systems) of differential equations. Topics covered include the fundamental concepts of linear algebra such as Gaussian elimination, matrix theory, linear transformations, vector spaces, subspaces, basis, eigenvectors, eigenvalues and the diagonalization of matrices, as well as the techniques for the analytic and numeric solutions of ordinary differential equations (and systems) that commonly appear in modern engineering and science.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132. Note: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 3044 or MA-UY 3054 or MA-UY 3083 or MA-UY 4204.
3 Credits Electricity, Magnetism, & Fluids PH-UY2023
This is the second course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Fluids at rest and in motion. An introduction to electric and magnetic forces and fields. Electric charge density. Electric fields from simple charge distributions. Electric potential. Capacitance.
Magnetic forces. Magnetic field from a current loop. Inductance. Magnetism
in matter. Current and resistance. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or an approved equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I, and EX-UY 1
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory I PH-UY2121
PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I (0.5:1:0:1). An introductory level experimental course. Fundamental laboratory experiments in classical mechanics and electrostatics. Stresses basic experimental techniques, error analysis, and written presentation of experiment results. Experiments require progressively more detailed and sophisticated analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 1013 and MA-UY 1124 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PH-UY 2023.
4 Credits Object Oriented Programming CS-UY2124
This intermediate-level programming course teaches object-oriented programming in C++. Topics: Pointers, dynamic memory allocation and recursion. Classes and objects including constructors, destructors, methods (member functions) and data members. Access and the interface to relationships of classes including composition, association and inheritance. Polymorphism through function overloading operators. Inheritance and templates. Use of the standard template library containers and algorithms.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1134 (C- or better); Corequisite: EX-UY 1
EE-UY2004 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Total: 16 credits

Spring Semester

4 Credits Discrete Mathematics MA-UY2314
Logic, proofs, set theory, functions, relations, asymptotic notation, recurrences, modeling computation, graph theory.
Prerequisite: Math Diagnostic Exam or MA-UY 912 or MA-UY 914 (minimum calculus level required)
Prerequisite for Shanghai students: MATH-SHU 110. Note: This course and CS-GY 6003 cannot both be taken for credit.
3 Credits Waves, Optics, & Thermodynamics PH-UY2033
This is the third course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Water, sound and electromagnetic waves. Reflection, scattering and absorption. Standing waves and spectra. Superposition, diffraction and beats. Geometrical optics. Introduction to thermodynamics; temperature, heat, and entropy. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Co-requisites: PH-UY 2131, and EX-UY 1.
1 Credits General Physics Laboratory II PH-UY2131
PH 2131 General Physics Laboratory II (0.5:1:0:1). The second part of the introductory physics laboratory program. Fundamental laboratory experiments in E&M, waves, optics, and thermodynamics. Stresses experimental models and design, error and data analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks.
Prerequisites: PH-UY 2121 and PH-UY 2023. Corequisite: PH-UY 2033
4 Credits Digital Logic and State Machine Design CS-UY2204
This course covers combinational and sequential digital circuits. Topics: Introduction to digital systems. Number systems and binary arithmetic. Switching algebra and logic design. Error detection and correction. Combinational integrated circuits, including adders. Timing hazards. Sequential circuits, flipflops, state diagrams and synchronous machine synthesis. Programmable Logic Devices, PLA, PAL and FPGA. Finite-state machine design. Memory elements. A grade of C or better is required of undergraduate computer-engineering majors.
Prerequisite: CS-UY 1114 (C- or better) or CS-UY 1133 (C- or better). ABET competencies: a, c, e, k.
EE-UY3114 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Total: 16 credits


Fall Semester

4 Credits Calculus Iii: Multi-dimensional Calculus MA-UY2114
Vectors in the plane and space. Partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Double and triple integrals. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates. Surface and line integrals. Divergence, gradient, and curl. Theorems of Gauss and Stokes.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1424 or MA-UY 1132.
4 Credits General Chemistry for Engineers CM-UY1004
This is a one-semester introductory course in general chemistry. It covers chemical equations, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, gases, atomic and molecular structure, periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical equilibrium, organic, inorganic and polymeric materials and electrochemistry.
Corequisite: EX-UY 1
4 Credits Computer Architecture and Organization CS-UY2214
This course covers a top-down approach to computer design. Topics: Computer architecture, introduction to assembly language programming and machine language set design. Computer organization, logical modules; CPU, memory and I/O units. Instruction cycles, the datapath and control unit. Hardwiring and microprogramming. The memory subsystem and timing. I/O interface, interrupts, programmed I/O and DMA. Introduction to pipelining and memory hierarchies. Fundamentals of computer networks.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) for computer engineering majors; (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314 for computer science majors. Students who are neither computer engineering majors nor computer science majors must take either CS-UY 2204 (C- or better) OR (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: ENGR-AD 121.
Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 2314 and CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) or CENG-SHU 201. ABET competencies: a, c, e.
EE-UY4001 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

EE Elective (3 Credits)

Total: 16 credits

Spring Semester

4 Credits Data Analysis MA-UY2224
An introductory course to probability and statistics. It affords the student some acquaintance with both probability and statistics in a single term. Topics in Probability include mathematical treatment of chance; combinatorics; binomial, Poisson, and Gaussian distributions; the Central Limit Theorem and the normal approximation. Topics in Statistics include sampling distributions of sample mean and sample variance; normal, t-, and Chi-square distributions; confidence intervals; testing of hypotheses; least squares regression model. Applications to scientific, industrial, and financial data are integrated into the course.NOTE: Not open to students who have taken MA-UY 2233 or MA-UY 3012 or MA-UY 3022.
Prerequisite: MA-UY 1124, MA-UY1424, or MA-UY 1132

2 EE/CS restricted electives (2 X 3-4 Credits)

HuSS elective (4 Credits)

Total: 14-16 credits


Fall Semester

EE/CS 4XX3 Design Project I (3 Credits)
EE/CS restricted elective (3-4 Credits)
2 HuSS electives (2 X 4 Credits)
Free elective (3 Credits)

Total: 17-18 credits

Spring Semester

EE/CS 4XX3 Design Project II (3 Credits)
EE/CS restricted elective (3-4 Credits)
2 EE/CS/EL electives (2 X 3 Credits)
HuSS elective (4 Credits)

Total: 16-17 credits

Total credits required for graduation: 128


Note: A GPA (Technical) of at least 2.0 is required in all EE, CS and EL courses.

1. For transfer students and students changing major, CS-UY 1012 Introduction to Computer Engineering is not required. EG-UY 1001 Engineering and Technology Forum and EG-UY 1003 Introduction to Engineering and Design may also be excused depending upon transfer credits.

2. Grades of at least C- are required in CS-UY 1114CS-UY 1134CS-UY 2124CS-UY 2204, and EE-UY 2004. C if repeated twice.

3. Choice of humanities and social sciences electives must conform to the established requirements of the Technology, Culture and Society Department. After the first-year writing courses, students will need one writing intensive elective course (W). In addition, one of the four courses must be a Junior or Senior-level course.

4. An EE/CS restricted elective is any course that a student has the pre-requisites for and is on the list of EE/CS Restricted Electives announced by the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Departments. Students must choose two (2) CS courses and two (2) EE courses from the list of Restricted Electives which is updated by the two departments.


CS Courses

3 Credits Design & Analysis of Algorithms CS-UY2413
This course covers fundamental principles of the design and analysis of algorithms. Topics include asymptotic notation, recurrences, randomized algorithms, sorting and selection, balanced binary search trees, augmented data structures, advanced data structures, algorithms on strings, graph algorithms, geometric algorithms, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming and NP completeness.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314
Prerequisites for Abu Dhabi Students: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MATH-AD 131
Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CSCI-SHU 2314 or MATH-SHU 120.
3 Credits Introduction to Databases CS-UY3083
This course introduces database systems and their approach as a mechanism to model the real world. The course covers data models (relational, object-oriented), physical database design, query languages, query processing and optimization, as well as transaction management techniques. Implementation issues, object oriented and distributed databases also are introduced.
Prerequisites: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and MA-UY 2314.
4 Credits Introduction to Operating Systm CS-UY3224
This course studies the fundamental concepts and principles of operating systems. Batch, spooling and multiprogramming systems are introduced. The parts of an operating system are described in terms of their functions, structure and implementation. Basic policies for allocating resources are discussed.
Prerequisites for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 2214 and (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better).
Prerequisites for Shanghai Students: CSCI-SHU 210 (C- or better) and CENG-SHU 202. ABET competencies: c, e, k.
4 Credits Introduction to Parallel and Distributed Systems CS-UY3254
This course offers a solid grounding in the basic issues and techniques of parallel and distributed computing. The material covers the spectrum from theoretical models of parallel and distributed systems to actual programming assignments.
Prerequisite: (CS-UY 2134 or CS-UY 1134) and (CS-UY 2124 or CS-UY 1124) (C- or better) and CS-UY 3224.
4 Credits Design and Implementation of Programming Languages CS-UY3314
This course covers issues underlying the design of high-level programming languages, along with elements of the compiler technology used to translate those languages into executable code. Topics covered include formal description of language syntax, parsing, memory management, attributes of variables and their binding times, control and data-abstraction mechanisms and object-oriented language features. The focus is on imperative and object-oriented languages, with brief introduction to functional and logic-programming paradigms. Substantial programming projects are required.
Prerequisites: CS-UY 2134 (C- or better).
3 Credits Computer Security CS-UY3923
This course covers cryptographic systems. Topics: Capability and access control mechanisms, authentication models, protection models. Database and operating system security issues, mobile code, security kernels. Malicious code, Trojan horses and computer viruses. Security policy formation and enforcement enforcement, legal aspects and ethical aspects.
Prerequisite for Brooklyn Engineering Students: CS-UY 2214.
Prerequisite for CAS Students: CSCI-UA 201.
Prerequisite for Abu Dhabi Students: CS-AD 104.
Co-requisite for All Students: CS-UY 3224
3 Credits Software Engineering CS-UY4513
Focusing on software engineering, the course introduces techniques to specify, design, test and document medium and large software systems. Design techniques include information engineering, object orientation and complexity measures. Also covered are testing methods, such as path testing, exhaustive test models and construction of test data. An introduction to software tools and project management techniques is presented. Student projects involve team software development and tracking.
Prerequisites: CS-UY 3224 and senior status.

EE Courses

EE-UY136 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY3054 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY3064 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY3193 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY3404 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY4144 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY4313 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
EE-UY4513 Please refer to the bulletin for more information