Feminism and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Minor | NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Feminism and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Minor

(FSTEM)


Prof Jin Montclare with two women students of color in lab

The Feminism and Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (FSTEM) minor trains students to have a critical understanding of the ways that difference and diversity, including gender, race, nationality, class, and ability, shape and are shaped by modern science and technology. Courses for the minor introduce students to the history of women in STEM, the construction of scientific theories of gender and racial difference, queer theory, designing for diversity, and the relationship between gender and disability. Feminist and other student-centered pedagogies encourage students to connect course content to the real world through in-class activities, independent research, writing assignments, engagement with community organizations, and design briefs.

In contemporary STEM fields, professionals must be equipped with the knowledge and tools to identify and decrease bias and unfairness in the design of technical systems, like AI and large-scale infrastructure projects. This minor, open to all Tandon students, prepares students to face these challenges head on and change the world for the better.

The minor consists of 16 credits, or 4 courses, offered by the TCS department. There is 1 required course, Introduction to FSTEM. The other 3 should be chosen from the list below.

Curriculum

This course introduces feminist theory as a foundational methodology for critically investigating of the fields of STEM. Feminist theory is not a political ideology nor an analytic framework limited to “women’s issues,” but an important way of asking questions about how hierarchies of power including gender, race, class, and disability, relate to the funding, research directions, and accessibility of science, technology, and engineering. While thinking through how STEM conforms to and creates social systems of difference, students in this course will learn how to apply feminist theory to contemporary case studies, examining issues of practice, ethics, social justice, and inequality in STEM.


CAM-UY2204 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
STS-UY2224 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
STS-UY3204 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
STS-UY3214 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

STS-UY 2904 Special Topics in STS: Diversity in Technology 
STS-UY 3904 Special Topics in STS: Queer Studies of Technoscience 
DM-UY 9103 Special Topics in Digital Media: Designing the PostNatural 
DM-GY 9103 Special Topics in Digital Media: Designing ‘Other’ Worlds 
DM-UY 9103 Special Topics in Digital Media: Critical Wearables 
DM-UY 9103 Special Topics in Digital Media: Living With Robots