Transportation Engineering Minor | NYU Tandon School of Engineering

Transportation Engineering Minor


Aerial view of buildings and moving traffic in a city

About the Minor

Transportation systems continue to be the main driving force behind the on-going race towards building smart cities of tomorrow. In fact, transportation systems are being re-invented, re-engineered, and revolutionized at a rate that has never been seen in the history except the time motorized transportation replaced horse and buggy approximately 100 years ago. The purpose of the Civil and Urban Engineering undergraduate minor in Transportation is to open new avenues to NYU’s undergraduate students from all disciplines to be involved in these exciting developments in transportation engineering and planning. The main educational goal is to provide students with the necessary foundations to use advanced analytical techniques and to employ emerging publicly available big data sources not only to analyze and evaluate existing transportation systems but also to plan and engineer future systems such as hyperloop and autonomous vehicles. Students will have the opportunity to learn to use advance simulation and spatial data analysis and visualization tools to assess the effects of implementing alternative designs of these emerging transportation systems. The capstone course will be the culminating experience to work on exciting real-world projects with leading industry and agency partners under the guidance of transportation faculty with a wealth of academic and practical experience in transportation engineering and planning. Students involved in this minor will also have the opportunity to work on exciting research projects led by the newly established USDOT Tier 1 University Transportation Center, C2SMART. Students are required to take a total of five classes.

The minor is open to undergraduate students. Transportation is a multidisciplinary field and undergraduates from other engineering departments, computer science, planners are all welcome to participate in this minor.

Learning Objectives of the Transportation Minor:

  • Learn urban transportation planning principles.
  • Develop foundational skills for evaluating transportation facilities and systems.
  • Enhance data-driven problem-solving capabilities and analytical reasoning skills.
  • Understand how new technologies can be applied to addressing urban transportation challenges

Transportation Minor Advisor: Each student participating in this minor is assigned a transportation faculty member within the CUE department as a minor advisor. The advisor will meet with the student at least once per semester. For the first year of the minor offering, Professor Joseph Chow will serve as the minor advisor.


Courses

Required Courses

3 Credits Transportation Engineering CE-UY2343
This course provides an introduction to transportation engineering. The course will cover travel demand forecasting, road user and vehicle characteristics, traffic engineering studies, engineering economic analysis, and highway design. The highway design element will focus on the basic design concepts of horizontal and vertical alignment, superelevation, and cross-section design. The course will also cover flexible pavement design, design of parking facilities, as well as bikeway and walkway design.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of Civil Engineering Program Advisor
or

3 Credits Introduction to Transportation Systems CE-UY3313
This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual elements of transportation systems and describes the approaches used to analyze and design transportation systems. The course covers the basic material about transportation systems, the context within which they operate and a characterization of their behavior.
Prerequisite: Junior status.

2 Credits Civil Engineering Design II CE-UY4822
This is the second part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers. Each year a specific project will created. Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project. Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester.
Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 4153 or advisor’s consent, Corequisite(s): CE-UY 4812 (with advisor’s consent)

 

Electives

Students may choose any three elective courses from the following:

Undergraduate

3 Credits Introduction to Transportation Systems CE-UY3313
This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual elements of transportation systems and describes the approaches used to analyze and design transportation systems. The course covers the basic material about transportation systems, the context within which they operate and a characterization of their behavior.
Prerequisite: Junior status.
3 Credits Transportation Engineering CE-UY2343
This course provides an introduction to transportation engineering. The course will cover travel demand forecasting, road user and vehicle characteristics, traffic engineering studies, engineering economic analysis, and highway design. The highway design element will focus on the basic design concepts of horizontal and vertical alignment, superelevation, and cross-section design. The course will also cover flexible pavement design, design of parking facilities, as well as bikeway and walkway design.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of Civil Engineering Program Advisor
3 Credits Traffic Engineering CE-UY3303
This course covers the fundamentals of traffic engineering. The characteristics of traffic streams, and how they are quantitatively described is included. The course covers an overview of traffic control and operations, including the timing and design of pre-timed and actuated signals. An introduction to highway capacity and level of service analysis is included, and the analysis of basic freeway segments and multilane highways is covered as an example of this type of analysis.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
3 Credits Transportation Systems and Software CE-UY3333
This course covers transportation software and its applications in understanding the impacts of traffic demand on the transportation system. Simulation software will be used to test the impacts of various signal timings and progressions on an arterial and a network. Fundamental concepts of signal coordination and progression will be treated. The Highway Capacity Software (HCS) package will be used to examine the effects of traffic on individual intersection delay and level of service.
Prerequisite: CE-UY 1002 or CE-UY 1502 or permission of Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
3 Credits Transportation Economics CE-UY3363
This course introduces the principles of engineering economic analysis and applies them to the analysis of transportation alternatives. The cost elements of transportation systems are presented and discussed. The course also reviews existing measures and legislation that provide funding for transportation projects, and discusses potential new approaches for the future.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
3 Credits Transportation Systems Analytics CE-UY3373
This course teaches students introductory methods to design transportation systems and informatics to evaluate the behavioral response of travelers. It trains students in fundamental problem solving skills needed to manage cyber-physical transportation networks in a smart cities era. The course is divided into three parts: (1) framework for analyzing urban systems under congestion and queueing, (2) intelligent transportation systems (ITS) to connect traveler decisions to system operations, and (3) constrained optimization methods to design and manage complex urban systems.
Prerequisite: (MA-UY 2224 or an approved equivalent) or Adviser's approval
3 Credits Analytics and Learning Methods for Smart Cities CE-UY4393
Basics of analytics and learning methods, with extensive applications in smart cities. Focuses on introduction of analytics and learning algorithms in their very basic forms, implementation in common coding languages, and smart city applications. Topics include probability review, inference, linear regression, classification, neural networks, and introduction to reinforcement learning. Applications include autonomous vehicles, traffic control, public transit, ridesharing, urban emergency response, smart grid, and smart buildings.
Prerequisites: CS-UY 1114 and MA-UY 2224 or equivalent

Up to ONE course from outside the CUE department can count toward these electives with approval of the Transportation Minor advisor. 

Examples of courses outside CUE department allowed:

MATH-UY0144 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
MATH-UY0211 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
4 Credits Introduction to Supply Chain Management MG-UY3304
This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to supply-chain management. The underlying objective is to introduce key supply-chain management concepts and examine relevant business practice. This course enables students to develop useful skills, in an increasingly global context, to analyze marketing, logistics, operations and channel-management issues.
Prerequisites: MG-UY 2004, MG-UY 2304 and MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2212 with MA-UY 2222.
4 Credits Management Science MG-UY4204
This course teaches students to create mathematical models of managerial problems. Types of models discussed include linear programming, integer-linear programming, non-linear programming, queuing models, decision-tree models, game-theoretic models, simulation models, inventory models and more. Each model is discussed in the context of the assumptions necessary for modeling and the robustness of the model’s managerial recommendations.
Prerequisites: 8 credits of calculus: MA-UY 1024 or MA-UY 1054 or MA-UY 1324 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 1124 or MA-UY 1154 or MA-UY 1424 or an approved equivalent; and MA-UY 2054 or MA-UY 2224 or MA-UY 2212 and MA-UY 2222.
Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Three credits of VIP in a transportation area approved by the minor advisor may also count toward the elective requirement.

Graduate Courses

Senior-level Students with cGPA>3.0 and approval of the Transportation Minor advisor may choose a graduate course in a transportation-related subject area to replace their outside elective. Examples include

CUSP-GY5002 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
CUSP-GY6002 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
CUSP-GY7002 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
PADM-UY4114 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
3 Credits Forecasting Urban Travel Demand TR-GY6113
The purpose of this course is to study methods and models used in estimating and forecasting person travel in urban areas. The objective is to understand the fundamental relationships between land use, transportation level of service and travel demand, and to apply methods and state-of-the-practice models for predicting person travel on the transportation system.
Prerequisite/Corequisite: TR-GY 6013 or permission of instructor.
3 Credits Urban Public Transportation Systems TR-GY7133
This course provides a thorough understanding of policy, planning, operational and technical issues that affect urban public transportation. It includes the historical development of cites and the rise of urban transport. Also covered are the characteristics of various urban transportation modes (their specific operating and infrastructure characteristics), as well as key elements that are critical to service provision, such as service planning, scheduling, fare collection, communication and signaling, station design and customer service. The course offers a broad perspective on regional planning, capital programming and policy matters. Special focus will be on emerging technologies and their practical applications.
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor.
URPL-UY2618 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Course Scenarios

Example Roadmap for CUE student interested in traffic:

  • Year 2: CE-UY 2343 Transportation Engineering (required for CUE)
  • Year 2: CE-UY 3303 Traffic Engineering
  • Year 3: CE-UY 3333 Transportation Systems and Software
  • Year 4: CE-UY 4393 Analytics and Learning Methods for Smart Cities (after taking CE-UY 2013 Computing in CUE)
  • Year 4: CE-UY 4822 Civil Engineering Design II

Example Roadmap for CUE student interested in public transit:

  • Year 2: CE-UY 2343 Transportation Engineering (required for CUE)
  • Year 2: CE-UY 3363 Transportation Economics
  • Year 3: CE-UY 3373 Transportation Systems Analytics (after taking MA-UY 2224 Data Analysis)
  • Year 4: MG-UY 4204 Management Science or CE-UY 4043 Sustainable Cities
  • Year 4: CE-UY 4822 Civil Engineering Design II

Example Roadmap for a non-CUE student interested in transportation policy analysis with a probability/stats pre-requisite:

  • Year 2: CE-UY 2343 Transportation Engineering
  • Year 2: CE-UY 3363 Transportation Economics
  • Year 3: CE-UY 3373 Transportation Systems Analytics (after taking probability/stats pre-req)
  • Year 4: A course from their major (if related) or one of the other electives (PADM-GP 4114 Surveys and Interviews if allowed)
  • Year 4: CE-UY 4822 Civil Engineering Design II

Example Roadmap for a non-CUE student interested in emerging mobility technologies with a probability/stats and computing pre-requisite:

  • Year 2: CE-UY 2343 Transportation Engineering
  • Year 3: CE-UY 3373 Transportation Systems Analytics (after taking probability/stats pre-req)
  • Year 3: A course from their major (if related) or one of the other electives (e.g. MATH-UA 0144 Introduction to Computer Simulation)
  • Year 4: CE-UY 4393 Analytics and Learning Methods for Smart Cities (after taking computing pre-req)
  • Year 4: CE-UY 4822 Civil Engineering Design II

Careers

Graduates are expected to pursue careers in traffic engineering, transportation planning, highway engineering, transportation systems modeling, public transit operations and planning, design of Intelligent Transportation Systems, or mobility data sciences. Example careers include highway development for the World Bank; designing multi-million dollar transit systems in New York for the MTA; creating traffic simulations to help coastal cities plan evacuation scenarios to prepare against hurricanes; developing data models for companies like Amazon, Google, or Via to transport people and goods across major metropolitan areas; or testing new emerging technologies like automated vehicles, smart grid, or drone monitoring systems for city agencies and mobility providers. Our graduates are prepared so that they can choose to embark on higher education to become transportation and mobility specialists in an emerging smart cities era. Example careers on Linkedin


Contact Information

Departmental Advisor: Joseph Chow

joseph.chow@nyu.edu