Civil Engineering, MS

On Campus

Brooklyn Bridge

Today’s populations are growing at exponential rates. The pace strains the built environment, with our shared civic infrastructure — our bridges, dams, airports, and highways, among other resources — nearing capacity levels. Civil engineers respond to the issue by improving existing systems and designing projects that answer the new challenges raised by modern society.

Our MS program in Civil Engineering trains you to join their ranks. You can specialize in any of the following concentrations:

  • construction management and engineering
  • structural engineering
  • geotechnical engineering
  • environmental and water resource engineering
  • urban systems engineering and management
  • highway and traffic engineering

Our program is flexible, and you may elect for a more general course of study by taking 2 courses in 3 areas of concentration.

About the Program

Admission to this program requires you to hold a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from a program accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). You also need to have a 3.0 GPA or better. Applicants lacking a BS from an ABET-accredited program in civil engineering (including those possessing undergraduate degrees in other engineering disciplines, engineering science, engineering technology and architecture, or from a foreign university) will have their qualifications reviewed by a graduate adviser. Admission may be granted and may include the requirement for additional undergraduate courses to correct deficiencies. These additional courses are not counted toward the MS degree, nor are undergraduate courses included in computing graduate grade-point averages.


While academic advisers will consult with and advise you, you are responsible for following the departmental rules outlined on these pages and in this catalog, for ensuring that all degree requirements are fulfilled, and for submitting all proper forms and applications. You must meet with an academic adviser when you first enroll and must have a detailed program of study formally approved by an academic adviser before registration.


Curriculum

To receive your Master of Science in Civil Engineering degree, you must choose to follow either the Single Area of Concentration or the General Program described below, and fulfill their requirements. Each requires a total of 30 credits. (Read about grade requirements below.)

Single Area of Concentration Requirements

  • core courses (minimum of 12 credits)
  • courses within a concentration (minimum of 12 credits)
  • technical electives (6 credits)

General Program Requirements

  • core courses (minimum of 12 credits)
  • 2 courses in 3 concentration areas (minimum of 18 credits)

With either program you choose (Single Area of Concentration or the General Program), you must complete at least 4 of following 6 core courses.

3 Credits Materials for Civil Engineers CE-GY6023
The course covers: Materials composition and production of cementitious materials; polymeric composites and metals; mechanical properties subject to short-term and long-term loads, impact and fire; fatigue and fracture; transport properties, chemical degradation and long-term durability.
Prerequisite: Graduate Status.
3 Credits Instrumentation, Monitoring and Condition Assessment of Civil Infrastructure CE-GY6073
This course covers: A systematic approach to planning and executing instrumentation, monitoring and condition assessment programs; strain measurements; civil engineering sensors (static, dynamic, optical); environmental measurements; mechatronic sensors; signal conditioning, information measurements and error analysis; business aspects; advanced-measurement systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Environmental Impact Assessment CE-GY7673
The course examines legal and technical requirements in preparing environmental-impact statements. Considerations include legal and technical requirements, the procedure and the interdisciplinary nature of the analysis. Topics include overall impact evaluation, categories of impacts, problem definition, quantification of impact, methods used in analysis, field evaluations, mitigations, hearing procedures and management. Practical examples and case studies are used.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Urban Infrastructure Systems Management CE-GY7843
This course provides a descriptive overview of key infrastructure systems and technologies that must be managed, operated and maintained. Systems treated include buildings and structures, water supply, solid and liquid waste handling and disposal, transportation, power, communications and information systems, health and hospitals, police and preprotection. The course explores the financial, political, administrative, legal and institutional settings of these systems and technologies. A portion of the course features distinguished guest lecturers who are experts in some of the systems and technologies included.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Project Management for Construction CE-GY8253
The course covers topics specific to developing and coordinating large projects, including organizational structures, management functions, pricing and estimating project costs, bidding and contracting, risk allocation, scheduling, time and cost control, labor relations, quality management and project life-cycle activities.
Note: Also listed under MG-GY 8253.
3 Credits Risk Analysis CE-GY8283
In this course, students investigate the ever-rising importance of risk analysis in project management. Topics include: analysis of qualitative and quantitative risk; techniques in probability analysis, sensitivity analysis, simulation of risk and utility theory; and computational methods for calculating risk. Students are exposed to real-world problems through case investigations.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing


If you are following the Single Area of Concentration program, you must complete:

  • At least 1 core course in your concentration area; and
  • At least 4 additional concentration area courses.

Depending on which choice of concentration you choose, you may have up to 6 additional credits of coursework, which you can satisfy in the following ways:

  • Electives: Students normally select courses given by the Department of Civil Engineering. However, you may select electives offered by other departments with written consent of your graduate adviser.
  • 3 Credits MS Project in Civil & Urban Engineering Department CE-GY9963
    This project involves analytical, design or experimental studies in civil engineering guided by a faculty adviser and following departmental guidelines. A written report is required.
    Prerequisites: degree status and project adviser’s approval.
  • CE 9976 Thesis for the MS in Civil Engineering, Credits: 6.00

To earn an MS degree from the School of Engineering, you must maintain a B average (3.0 GPA) or better in

  1. all graduate courses taken at the School of Engineering,
  2. all graduate courses taken in the Department of Civil Engineering and
  3. all graduate guided studies (readings, project, thesis).

Poor scholastic performance (under 3.0 GPA) may lead to being placed on graduate probation. If your grades do not improve, you may be disqualified from further graduate study in the department. You may repeat a course with your adviser’s approval. When a course is repeated, only the later grade counts toward your GPA. If a course is repeated more than once, only the first grade is dropped from the GPA computation. In the event that you are required to take undergraduate prerequisite courses as a condition of admission, a grade of B- or better is required for every prerequisite course taken, and the cumulative GPA of all required prerequisite courses must be at least 3.0.


Concentrations

Select at least 4 of the following courses:

3 Credits Ground Improvement CE-GY8423
The course discusses foundation engineering practice, foundation rehabilitation, and emerging ground- improvement technologies. Topics covered are the selection, design and analysis of ground-improvement techniques for different foundation problems, as well as the construction, monitoring and performance evaluation of such solutions.
Prerequisites: undergraduate soil mechanics and foundations, CE-UY 4173 or equivalent.
3 Credits Advanced Foundation Design CE-GY8663
Topics covered: Advanced analysis of foundations, shallow foundations, bearing capacity, settlement, deep foundations, axial and lateral loading of piles, wave equation analysis, drilled piers, design and construction issues, and case histories.
Prerequisites: undergraduate soil mechanics and foundations, CE-UY 4173 or equivalent.
3 Credits Excavation Support Systems CE-GY8673
The course covers design and construction methodologies for excavation support systems, including soldier pile, sheet pile, and secant pile wall systems. Both traditional limit-equilibrium and modern elastoplastic analysis methods will be presented. Students will get the opportunity to utilize industry software to design excavation support systems. Last, for the 1st time this year, students will have the opportunity to also experience excavation support systems in virtual or augmented reality.
Prerequisites: undergraduate Geotechnical Engineering.
3 Credits Geotechnics & Geomaterials CE-GY8403
This course examines index properties of soil, mechanical behavior, shear strength, stress-strain characteristics, drained and undrained soil behavior, permeability, seepage, groundwater flow and control and consolidation
of soils.
Prerequisite: undergraduate soil mechanics, CE-UY 3153 or equivalent.
3 Credits Urban Geotechnology CE-GY8433
The course looks at case histories on geotechnical design, construction and rehabilitation in the urban environment. Topics covered: Special construction problems and innovative solutions; unforeseen ground conditions; performance monitoring; remedial planning and implementation; and geotechnical design and construction issues from a practicing engineer’s perspective.
Prerequisite: undergraduate soil mechanics and foundations, CE-UY 4173 or equivalent.
3 Credits Environmental Geotechnology CE-GY8493
The course covers: Clay mineralogy; soil-water interaction processes; chemical transport through soils; hydraulic conductivity, diffusion and attenuation mechanisms; water-disposal systems; design of land-fills, seepage barriers and cut-off walls; geo-environmental site characterization techniques; and soil-remediation techniques.
Prerequisite: undergraduate soil mechanics, CE-UY 3153 or equivalent.
3 Credits Groundwater Hydrology and Pollution CE-GY7233
This course looks at the characteristics of confined and unconfined flow of water through porous media; groundwater and well hydraulics; quality of groundwater; environmental influences; groundwater pollution; management aspects of groundwater and groundwater modeling.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 2214 (Fluid Mechanics) or equivalent or instructor’s permission.
3 Credits Selected Topics in Geotechnical Engineering CE-GY8603
The course explores current special interest topics, such as ground improvement, geotechnical earthquake engineering, site characterization and remediation. Topics vary with each offering and are disseminated before registration.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 4173 or equivalent.


3 Credits Theory of Structural Analysis and Design CE-GY6013
The course discusses theories of structural analysis and their relationship to design. Topics: Classical structural mechanics, matrix procedures and numerical methods in problem-solving; and analysis of statically indeterminate beams, frames and trusses using force and displacement methods. Also considered are elastic supports, movement of supports and temperature effects.
Prerequisite: undergraduate structural analysis.
3 Credits Finite Element Methods CE-GY6163
Students study the basic theory of the finite element method and learn how to apply it using widely used engineering programs. The course emphasizes developing finite element models and executing the analysis. Students learn to recognize modeling errors and inconsistencies that could lead to either inaccurate or invalid results.
3 Credits Selected Topics in Structural Analysis I CE-GY6033
This course discusses special current interest topics. It is offered at irregular intervals by advance announcement. Graduate advisers may approve repeat registration for different topics.
Prerequisite: adviser’s approval.
3 Credits Selected Topics in Structural Analysis II CE-GY6043
This course discusses special current interest topics. It is offered at irregular intervals by advance announcement. Graduate advisers may approve repeat registration for different topics.
Prerequisite: adviser’s approval.
3 Credits Bridge Engineering CE-GY6063
The course covers types of bridges; geometric design of bridges; construction materials and techniques; simplified bridge analysis; special problems in the design of steel and reinforced-concrete bridges; bridge inspection policies; bridge rehabilitation procedures; bridge management systems; and the effects of wind and earthquakes on long-span bridges.
Prerequisites: undergraduate structural analysis and steel design.
3 Credits Stability of Structures CE-GY6133
The course addresses the stability of structural systems. Topics: Investigation of buckling of structural configurations composed of beams, plates, rings and shells; effects of initial geometric imperfections, load eccentricities and inelastic behavior; and the application of energy measures and numerical techniques.
Prerequisite: adviser’s approval.
3 Credits Steel Structures CE-GY6143
This course explores compression members; elastic and inelastic buckling of columns and plates; lateral support of beams; torsion of open and closed sections; warping; lateral torsional buckling of beams; and bi-axial bending. Other topics include: Plate girders, including stability of webs and flanges; combined bending and axial load; instability analysis; and design of rigid and semi-rigid mechanisms of continuous beams and rigid frames. Both elastic and plastic design criteria are discussed.
Prerequisite: Undergraduate steel design.
3 Credits Concrete Structures CE-GY6183
The course covers design principles and construction methods for reinforced and pre-stressed concrete structural elements; response of members subject to axial loading, shear and flexure; design of columns, deep beams and shear walls; design and detailing for connection regions; design of pre-tensioned and post-tensioned beams and slabs; and the effect of short-term and long-term deformations.
Prerequisite: Graduate status.
3 Credits Wind and Earthquake Engineering CE-GY6193
The course examines characteristics of wind and earthquake loads; atmospheric motions and boundary layer theory; response of structures to wind forces; code treatments of wind loads on structures; calculation of lateral forces from seismic events; lateral force-resisting systems; diaphragms and center of rigidity; response spectrum and time-history; ductility; concrete and steel frame structures; braced frames; shear walls; dual systems; story drift; detailing requirements.
Prerequisite: Graduate status.


Construction Management Graduate Courses

3 Credits Selected Topics in Infrastructure Systems CE-GY7983
This course examines topics of current interest in infrastructure systems. Topics vary with each offering and are disseminated before the semester of offering.
Prerequisite: Instructor's Permission
3 Credits Slctd Topic in Infrastructure Systems CE-GY7993
This course examines topics of current interest in infrastructure systems. Topics vary with each offering and are disseminated before the semester of offering.
Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission
3 Credits Project Management CE-GY8203
This course covers management of technology-based projects ranging—from individual research and development to large-scale and complex technological systems. Topics covered include: feasibility and risk analyses; project selection and portfolio optimization; functional and administrative structures; coordination and scheduling of activities; personnel planning; negotiations and contracts; cost estimation; capital budgeting; cost controls; and effective matrix management. Also listed as MG-GY 8203.
3 Credits Construction Modeling Techniques CE-GY8243
This course deals with various construction-modeling techniques, including the development of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) design documents. Students are introduced to the development of building information models (BIM) and their associated databases, using state-of-the-art design and management systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Project Management for Construction CE-GY8253
The course covers topics specific to developing and coordinating large projects, including organizational structures, management functions, pricing and estimating project costs, bidding and contracting, risk allocation, scheduling, time and cost control, labor relations, quality management and project life-cycle activities.
Note: Also listed under MG-GY 8253.
3 Credits Construction Cost Estimating CE-GY8263
This course covers estimating and cost control from the viewpoint of contractors and construction engineers; details of estimating with emphasis on labor, materials, equipment and overhead. Also listed as MG-GY 8263.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Contracts and Specifications CE-GY8273
This course covers principles of contract law as applied to the construction industry and legal problems in preparing and administering construction contracts. Also listed as MG-GY 8273.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Risk Analysis CE-GY8283
In this course, students investigate the ever-rising importance of risk analysis in project management. Topics include: analysis of qualitative and quantitative risk; techniques in probability analysis, sensitivity analysis, simulation of risk and utility theory; and computational methods for calculating risk. Students are exposed to real-world problems through case investigations.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Construction Operations Analysis CE-GY8293
This course examines the evaluation and model development of productivity, safety, quality and materials handling in construction operations. Topics include the principal methods for analysis and pre-planning work activities, including the use of three-dimensional (3D) building information models (BIM), four-dimensional (4D) and fully integrated and automated project processes (FIAPP), logistics animation, Monte Carlo scheduling, stochastic simulation and queuing theory. Students are introduced to the use of financial models for task, activity, project and program analyses.
Prerequisite: CE-GY 8243 or Construction Management Program Director’s approval.
3 Credits Information Systems in Project Management CE-GY8303
The course examines the use of contemporary tools for managing the vast array of information over the life of a project. Information handling is reviewed from the perspectives of knowledge acquisition and presentation. The course focuses on applying three-dimensional (3D) building information models (BIM) and four-dimensional (4D) and fully integrated and automated-project processes (FIAPP) that integrate 3D computer models, simulation, cost estimating, scheduling, procurement and information technology (with emphasis on the implementation of 3D computer models and relational databases as information systems for project information handling and project automation).
Prerequisite: CE-GY 8243 or Construction Management Program Director’s approval.
3 Credits Engineering for Construction I: Methods and Technologies CE-GY8313
This course covers planning, design and equipment for new construction and for infrastructure rehabilitation; engineering fundamentals of earth moving; soil stabilization and compaction; methods for tunneling through rock and earth and rock blasting; foundation grouting; piles and pile driving equipment; dewatering systems and pumping equipment; factors affecting the selection of construction equipment; review of conventional construction equipment; and trends in robotics.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Engineering for Construction Ii: Design CE-GY8323
This course is an in-depth analysis of design methods for construction operations. Topics covered: Earth pressure analysis and structural analysis. Design for sheet pile walls, cofferdams, underpinning systems, tieback systems and pipejacking systems. Details of a dewatering system design. Special studies in constructability and value engineering.
Prerequisite: CE-GY 8313 or Construction Management Program Director’s approval.
3 Credits Marketing for Construction Management and Engineering Services CE-GY8333
This course focuses on the process of procurement of construction management and engineering services. It incorporates a hands-on approach to current industry practices. The materials address the following: identifying leads; researching and evaluating competition through various sources; reviewing and critiquing requests for qualifications (RFQ) and requests for proposals (RFP) and responses; developing a marketing resume; developing project profiles; evaluating presentations; and selecting successful candidates. Students will prepare their own proposals and presentations.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Construction Site Safety CE-GY8343
This course is for individuals who are interested in construction safety and the realities of a construction project and for those seeking certification as a Site Safety Manager from the New York City (NYC) Department of Buildings (DOB). Students learn about the comprehensive Subchapter 19 of the New York City Building Code and the City's Rules and Regulations on construction site safety projects. The course curriculum includes the content approved by the NYC DOB to prepare students for the Site Safety Manager examination.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Construction Scheduling CE-GY8353
Students will be instructed in advanced Critical Path Method (CPM) construction scheduling techniques including the use of Primavera Project Planner v. 7.0. The course will cover Precedence Diagramming Method (PDM), project resources and resource leveling, schedule updating, schedule impacts of date constraints, project time and cost trade-offs, activity duration estimating, work breakdown structures, differing scheduling requirements on different types of construction projects and an overview of construction contract scheduling specifications. An introduction to other scheduling methodologies and the use of schedules in construction claims will also be addressed.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

CE 8363 Building Information Modeling Project Controls, Credits: 3.00
3 Credits Construction Accounting and Finance CE-GY8373
This course introduces students to the uses of accounting and financial analysis in decision making in a construction and development environment. The course will demonstrate to students how the principles of accounting and financial management can be adapted for, and used in the management of construction companies and project management. Students will review accounting concepts, rules, regulations and reporting requirements as they apply to construction and development, and they will use and create accounting and financial models.
CE-GY9933 Please refer to the bulletin for more information

Exec 21 Courses 

3 Credits Managing and Leading in the 21st Century CE-GY8703
Today’s mega projects require the formation of large multidisciplinary teams including engineers, constructors and financial, legal and business experts. Success in this challenging environment requires up-to-date and proven leadership and management skills. This course covers the basic components of management planning, organizing, directing, controlling and decision-making. It defines the engineering and construction team and discusses leadership styles. This course also addresses the management of change, external factors that shape decisions, the development of personal leadership abilities and, ultimately, 21st century leadership requirements.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits Construction and the Law CE-GY8713
Construction industry executives need not be legal experts, but they must be aware of the legal issues affecting their industry and their bottom line. This course uses the case study method to lead students through the concepts of design and construction law. The course focuses on the interface of legal, business and technical issues and their resolution. It includes the design and organization of construction documents; the legal aspects of bidding, subcontracting, bonds, insurance, mechanic’s liens, etc; and the implication of delays, changes and charged conditions. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods are introduced.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits How to Succeed in Construction CE-GY8723
This course leads students through the how-to’s of running a successful, large, complex construction company. It analyzes how the industry actually works, including contractual relationships with clients in all types of projects from design/build to privatization. It covers the business fundamentals of running a construction company, including issues such as surety and insurance: various types of construction organizations, domestic and international; and company culture - inner-workings of a business that can mean the differences between success and failure.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits Infrastructure Financing: Structuring of A Deal CE-GY8733
This course examines what it takes to structure a deal from a credit perspective, legally and financially, for domestic and international projects. In the domestic sector, the course focuses on transportation projects, examining the peculiarities and the uniqueness of the capital market. Examples are studied and recent changes are discussed in areas such as financing transportation projects and the dramatically changing nature of financing these projects. In the international sector, the course covers innovative financing techniques.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
Employer Focused Residency CE-GY875X
In this course, students define a proposal for a project, the subject of which may be related to their employment. Students work one-on-one with an adviser throughout the semester. There is no formal classroom work; however, students must update their adviser weekly. The project runs no longer than one semester. Students formally present their projects’ findings to invited guests at the end of the semester.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits Capital Program Management / Program Development CE-GY8763
The course examines the process of capital program management and development. Depending upon the instructor and project used for illustration, the course analyses how either the public or private sector views a project and develops it and the internal workings of an organization in determining how a project is selected, funded and managed. The course examines various contracting strategies, as well as the concepts of risk allocation, funding and project finance.
Prerequisite: Admission to Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits Dispute Avoidance and Resolution CE-GY8773
This course analyzes the basic causes for construction disputes and introduces methods for dispute avoidance by proper risk allocation, management and control, as well as other techniques, including partnering. It uses the case study method to address litigation and provides an understanding of the process of arbitration and other alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods such as negotiation, mediation, mini trials and dispute review boards.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits Construction Management and Planning CE-GY8783
Strategic planning is indispensable to achieving superior management. This course in business planning provides practical advice for organizing the planning system, acquiring and using information and translating strategic plans into decisive action. This knowledge is an invaluable resource for top and middle-level executives.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
3 Credits Infrastructure Planning for Public Works CE-GY8803
This course deals with the process whereby infrastructure projects are conceived, studied, and implemented. The focus will be on the management and leadership roles of the key players in public works agencies. Lectures, reading assignments, and classroom discussions will deal with both routine procedures and controversial issues. Students will research and report on important public works projects and on special topics in infrastructure planning.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.


Select at least 4 of the following courses:

3 Credits Hydrology CE-GY7223
3 Credits Groundwater Hydrology and Pollution CE-GY7233
This course looks at the characteristics of confined and unconfined flow of water through porous media; groundwater and well hydraulics; quality of groundwater; environmental influences; groundwater pollution; management aspects of groundwater and groundwater modeling.
Prerequisites: CE-UY 2214 (Fluid Mechanics) or equivalent or instructor’s permission.
3 Credits Environmental Chemistry & Microbiology CE-GY7373
The course introduces the chemistry and microbiology of polluted and natural waters, including applications of principles developed.
3 Credits Water & Wastewater Treatment CE-GY7423
The course covers the physical, chemical and biological principles of process design and treatment of water and wastewater. Topics include aeration, filtration, softening, chemical treatment, coagulation, occulation, desalination, and taste and odor control.
Co-requisite: CE-GY 7373.
3 Credits Selected Topics in Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering I CE-GY7353
This course examines topics of current interest in water resources and hydraulic engineering. Topics vary with each offering and are disseminated before the semester of offering.
Prerequisite: instructor’s permission.
3 Credits Advanced Environmental Chemistry & Microbiology CE-GY7393
This course explores advanced topics in chemistry and microbiology of polluted and natural wastewater treatment.
Prerequisite: CE-GY 7373 or equivalent.
3 Credits Advanced Water & Wastewater Treatment CE-GY7433
This course covers further the processes discussed in CE-GY 7423. Topics include sedimentation, adsorption, aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment, sludge treatment and disposal.
Prerequisite: CE-GY 7423. Co-requisite: CE-GY 7393.
3 Credits Water and Wastewater Treatment Laboratory CE-GY7453
This laboratory course covers processes in water and wastewater engineering, dealing with physical, chemical and biological methods and principles. Processes include disinfection, softening, sedimentation, oxygen transfer, coagulation, adsorption, filtration and aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment systems, and Warburg analysis of waste.
Co-requisite: CE-GY 7433.
3 Credits Modeling Fate and Transport of Surface Water Pollution CE-GY7473
The course covers dispersal and decay of contaminants introduced into lakes, streams, estuaries and oceans, and the effects of pollutants on chemical quality and ecology of receiving waters.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Hazardous/toxic Waste Management CE-GY7533
The course looks at methods in the management of hazardous/toxic waste sites. Topics covered include health and safety, legal aspects, contamination of the environment, treatment processes, and toxicology and risk assessment.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Solid Waste Management CE-GY7703
The course covers engineering aspects of solid waste collection, transport and disposal, including incineration, sanitary landfill, composting, recovery and reutilization. Also covered is the economic evaluation of factors affecting selection of disposal methods.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Environmental Systems Management CE-GY7753
This course provides an overview of information technologies as applied to the remote sensing of environmental infrastructure systems, and includes the development of infrastructure system databases to assist complex decision-making on environmental infrastructures.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Environmental Geotechnology CE-GY8493
The course covers: Clay mineralogy; soil-water interaction processes; chemical transport through soils; hydraulic conductivity, diffusion and attenuation mechanisms; water-disposal systems; design of land-fills, seepage barriers and cut-off walls; geo-environmental site characterization techniques; and soil-remediation techniques.
Prerequisite: undergraduate soil mechanics, CE-UY 3153 or equivalent.


Select at least 4 of the following courses:

TR-GY6313 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
TR-GY6323 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
TR-GY6013 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
TR-GY6023 Please refer to the bulletin for more information
3 Credits Intelligent Transportation Systems and Their Applications TR-GY6223
This course introduces the concepts and applications of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and its growing role in the management of transportation systems. The course stresses the role of ITS as national policy, as specified in major transportation funding legislation – ISTEA, TEA21 and SAFETY-LU. A systems engineering approach to overall development of ITS technologies is stressed. Major components of ITS are discussed, and examples of their application treated. Coordination and integration of ITS components are treated.
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor.
3 Credits Multimodal Transportation Safety TR-GY7033
Technology, legislation and market forces have contributed to improved transportation safety for decades. But one must consider which metrics are most relevant for which modes, the role of demographics and traffic levels and other factors when analyzing and predicting safety trends. The course pays attention to a systems view, to metrics by mode and to both standard field and statistical analyses. Consistent with current priorities, the course addresses security as well as safety issues.
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor.
3 Credits Management of Urban Traffic Congestion TR-GY7123
The purpose of this course is to (1) understand the causes of traffic congestion and to measure how congestion impacts transportation users and communities, (2) set forth a vision for managing congestion and (3) develop and evaluate strategies and policies that achieve the vision.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Design of Parking & Terminal Facilities TR-GY7323
This course covers design techniques and approaches to a variety of pedestrian and vehicular needs in conjunction with access to land functions. Parking serves as the primary access interface to many land facilities, from shopping centers and sports facilities, to medium- and high-density residential developments. The
planning and design of parking facilities, and the planning of access and egress from these facilities, is critical to the economic success of a development. Terminals are inter-modal interface facilities involving the transfer of people
and/or goods from one mode of transportation to another. This course covers essential elements of terminal planning and design, including transit stations and terminals, major goods terminals at ports and railheads and others. The design of pedestrian space and ways within terminal structures is also treated
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor.

TR 7333 Measure Theory I, Credits: 3.00
TR-GY7343 Please refer to the bulletin for more information


Select at least 4 of the following courses:

3 Credits Infrastructure Planning, Engineering and Economics CE-GY7813
This course covers the identification, formulation, preliminary appraisal and detailed analysis of individual civil engineering projects and systems. It also covers different approaches for government agencies, public utilities, industrial firms and private entrepreneurs. Other topics include: Planning, which considers projects that satisfy single and multiple purposes and objectives, meet local and regional needs and take advantage of opportunities for development; financial and economic analyses, including sensitivity and risk analysis; mathematical models for evaluation of alternatives and optimization; and impacts of projects: environmental, social, regional economic growth, legal and institutional and public involvement.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Infrastructure Asset Management CE-GY7853
This course reviews state-of-the-art performance monitoring and system condition assessment methodologies as part of infrastructure management systems. Emphasis is on information technologies as applied to remote sensing and database development for urban systems management. Infrastructure tools, such as GIS and dedicated databases for condition assessment are represented in a laboratory environment. Invited experts participate in such areas as transportation, water distribution and utilities.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Instrumentation, Monitoring and Condition Assessment of Civil Infrastructure CE-GY6073
This course covers: A systematic approach to planning and executing instrumentation, monitoring and condition assessment programs; strain measurements; civil engineering sensors (static, dynamic, optical); environmental measurements; mechatronic sensors; signal conditioning, information measurements and error analysis; business aspects; advanced-measurement systems.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Environmental Systems Management CE-GY7753
This course provides an overview of information technologies as applied to the remote sensing of environmental infrastructure systems, and includes the development of infrastructure system databases to assist complex decision-making on environmental infrastructures.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
3 Credits Construction and the Law CE-GY8713
Construction industry executives need not be legal experts, but they must be aware of the legal issues affecting their industry and their bottom line. This course uses the case study method to lead students through the concepts of design and construction law. The course focuses on the interface of legal, business and technical issues and their resolution. It includes the design and organization of construction documents; the legal aspects of bidding, subcontracting, bonds, insurance, mechanic’s liens, etc; and the implication of delays, changes and charged conditions. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods are introduced.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.

You must meet the requirements for Exec 21 courses to take this:
3 Credits Infrastructure Financing: Structuring of A Deal CE-GY8733
This course examines what it takes to structure a deal from a credit perspective, legally and financially, for domestic and international projects. In the domestic sector, the course focuses on transportation projects, examining the peculiarities and the uniqueness of the capital market. Examples are studied and recent changes are discussed in areas such as financing transportation projects and the dramatically changing nature of financing these projects. In the international sector, the course covers innovative financing techniques.
Prerequisite: Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
 
3 Credits Intelligent Transportation Systems and Their Applications TR-GY6223
This course introduces the concepts and applications of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and its growing role in the management of transportation systems. The course stresses the role of ITS as national policy, as specified in major transportation funding legislation – ISTEA, TEA21 and SAFETY-LU. A systems engineering approach to overall development of ITS technologies is stressed. Major components of ITS are discussed, and examples of their application treated. Coordination and integration of ITS components are treated.
Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of instructor.