Graphene: A New Paradigm in Condensed Matter and Device Physics


Oxford University Press, 2013

Graphene: A New Paradigm in Condensed Matter and Device Physics is an introduction to the science and possible applications of Graphene, the first one-atom-thick crystalline form of matter. The book describes the unusual physics of the material: that it offers linear rather than parabolic energy bands. The Dirac-like electron energy bands lead to high constant carrier speed, similar to light photons. The lattice symmetry further implies a two-component wave-function, which has a practical effect of cancelling direct backscattering of carriers. The resulting high carrier mobility allows observation of the Quantum Hall Effect at room temperature, unique to Graphene. The material is two-dimensional, but in sizes micrometers nearly to meters displays great tensile strength but vanishing resistance to bending.

The book reviews theoretical predictions of excessive atomic vibrational motion, tied to the dimensionality. The book reviews potential applications within existing electronics, to include interconnect wires, flash-memory elements, and high frequency field effect transistors. The chance to supplant the dominant CMOS family of silicon logic devices is assessed.

Wolf is a professor in NYU-Poly’s Department of Applied Physics.