National Engineers Week Celebration 2016

Wednesday, February 17, 2016 - 6:00pm - 8:00pm EST

  • Location:New-York Historical Society
    170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)

    New York, NY
  • Price:$10.00

Image: New York World’s Fair IBM Pavilion, 1964. Courtesy of IBM Corporation Archives.

Come join us as we celebrate National Engineers Week and you—our engineering alumni! Our evening reception will be held at the New-York Historical Society followed by a private viewing of the exhibit Silicon City: Computer History Made in New York. Paul Horn, Senior Vice Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Entrepreneurship, and Distinguished Industry Professor at Tandon School of Engineering, will share with us his role in the reinvention of IBM in the mid-90s, and the move of IBM Research into the software and services arenas.

Dr. Paul M. Horn was named NYU Distinguished Scientist in Residence in September of 2008 and Senior Vice Provost for Research in September 2009. In this role, he manages NYU’s worldwide research enterprise, including new programs at NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai, entrepreneurship programs, and technology transfer activities.

Dr. Horn is credited with greatly expanding the connections between NYU, industry, and the VC community; the starting of an NYU Venture Fund and Board; a huge increase in start-up activity; and a number of new entrepreneurship activities including Tech Expos, an Entrepreneurship Festival and start-up boot camps.

In a previous position as Senior Vice President of the IBM Corporation and Executive Director of research, he directed IBM’s worldwide Research program with 3200 technical employees at eight sites in five countries around the world, and helped guide IBM’s overall technical strategy. In his 28 years with IBM, Dr. Horn was known for translating technology based research into marketplace opportunities. Under his leadership, IBM Research produced an unmatched string of technological breakthroughs, semiconductors, software, and hardware, including the chess-playing supercomputer Deep Blue; the world's first copper chip; the giant magneto-resistive head (GMR); strained silicon (a discovery that allows chips to run up to 35 percent faster); and BlueGene, the world’s fastest supercomputer that brought computing leadership back to the United States. As one of IBM’s most senior technical executive reporting to Lou Gerstner, Dr. Horn played a significant role in the reinvention of IBM in the mid-90s, and the move of IBM Research into the software and services arenas.

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