Venue 2: Room 331

Students: Angela  Chen, Ritwik Saha, Temilola AdeosunDjenabou DialloVi LeAdjoa AnamanPaulina Babiak, Edward HuangMaria YampolskayaArthur MoselyKevin LiangRockella Caporale, Olena Nazarenko, Raima ShafiqJason SuwandiJeremy Eng and Troy Ramsarran

 

Angela Chen

Angela

Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab

Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri

Mentor: Jeffrey Laut

Time: 10.00 am

 

Abstract:

The Dynamical Systems Laboratory has constructed an aquatic mobile robot for the environmental monitoring of polluted bodies of water, equipped with a GPS sensor for providing location data and a multi-parameter water quality sensor. As the robot moves about the canal, this data is logged to a file that may be post-processed. To provide an accurate map of the water quality throughout the canal, one must consider the low-accuracy of the GPS position information, and properly treat the data. The high-school student will work with the graduate student mentor to gather environmental data, filter it, and represent it in a way that is easy to understand by citizen-scientists, or people who may have limited scientific background.

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Ritwik Saha and Temilola Adeosun

Ritwik Temilola

Lab: Applied Dynamics and Optimization Lab

Faculty: Dr. Joo H. Kim

Mentors: Carlotta Mummolo, Dustyn Roberts, Henry Clever and Seunghoon Jeong

Time: 10.12 am

 

Abstract

When studying the fundamental principles of bipedal walking researchers are always concerned about two critical aspects of locomotion: energy consumption and balance stability. A general biped model, such as humans or humanoid robot, can perform a gait cycle with different levels of balance stability and consuming different amounts of energy, depending on the gait strategy adopted. We want to analyze and compare the energy consumption and balance stability in both human and robot walking. Understanding how these two characteristics are balanced in the normal human walking could help us planning the walking motion of stable and energy efficient humanoid robots.

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Djenabou Diallo

Djenabou

Lab: ISIS Lab

Faculty: Dr. Nasir Memon

Mentor: Jay Koven

Time: 10.32 am

 

Abstract:

I-VEST is a visual analytic tool to help investigators find pertinent information in very large email collections. We are using a combination of analytic tools including visualization, entity extraction, information retrieval and machine learning techniques to aid the search process and to give the analyst a fast and accurate picture of the entities and topics in the emails retrieved. The student working on this project would be assisting with the improvement of the user interface by performing email searches of a test dataset and documenting the steps and results. In addition they would be working with others doing the same tasks and again documenting the results. The feedback from this process will be used to refine the user interface for the next step of a controlled user experiment.

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Vi Le

Vi Le

Lab: Bio-Molecular Engineering

Faculty: Dr. Jin Ryoun Kim

Mentor: Vandan Shah

Time: 10.44 am

 

Abstract:

Bio-catalytic proteins, enzymes, have many potential industrial applications. Unfortunately, successful applications of enzymes are frequently limited by their instability and tendency to aggregate. The objective of this research is to explore various small molecules to increase the stability of enzymes. The effects of these small molecules on enzyme stability will be carefully evaluated using various experimental means. The whole study will help us to design protein solutions for increased stability or reduced aggregation.

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Adjoa Anaman

Adjoa

Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab

Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri

Mentor: Adel Shams and Mohammad Jalalisendi

Time: 11.04 am

 

Abstract

Water entry occurs when the front of a ship hull rises above the water surface and then re-enters with a high velocity. This phenomenon induces impulsive and large pressure loads to the ship hull. Understanding the physics behind the impact dynamics of ship hulls is of great importance for the design of cost-efficient planning vessels. The Dynamical System Laboratory (DSL) has been involved in an experimental campaign to better understand the physics behind the hull slamming phenomena. The high-school student will work with the graduate student mentors to design the experimental setup and perform the experiments.

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Paulina Babiak and Edward Huang

Edward and Paulina

Lab: Bio-interfacial Engineering Lab

Faculty: Dr. Rastislav Levicky

Mentor: Ursula Koniges and Kip Daly

Time: 11.16 am

 

Abstract

DNA & RNA oligonucleotides offer a variety of applications in a range of fields including: computer engineering, materials engineering, and especially bio-medical engineering. Some of the most promising applications include the creation of DNA-based sensor arrays that could allow for the diagnosis of genetic disorders and rapid gene profiling among other applications. This summer, we will be using DNA/RNA hybrids called chimeras to create such sensor arrays. Chimeras are interesting materials for such arrays as they could have unique properties not found in either RNA or DNA.

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Maria Yampolskaya

IMG_9193

Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab

Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri

Mentor: Violet Mwaffo

Time: 11.36 am

 

Abstract:

The Dynamical Systems Laboratory (DSL) has been involved in an experimental campaign to better understand fish behavior and interactions with its environment. In laboratory settings, fish-based experiments typically are performed in fish tanks, where fish often interact with the walls of the tank. The student will contribute to the goal of better understanding fish behavior  by working on a model for describing how fish interact with walls in laboratory settings. This will be done by using a tracking software to extract data from experimental videos of fish swimming in a tank, using appropriate software to analyze data, and working with the graduate student mentor to develop a model.

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Arthur Mosley

Arthur

Lab: ISIS Lab

Faculty: Dr. Nasir Memon

Mentor: Tzipora Halevi

Time: 11.48 am

 

Abstract:

Mobile Phone: The project looks at trends of mobile phone users and at the security measures they take. The project examines the way users perform different functions on the phone, including reading web documents and responding to questionnaires. The goal of the project is to learn about mobile phone usability and the relationship to users’ security choices and concerns. The student will participate by running the study, gathering the data as well as help analyze it. The student will further take part in the documentation stage and will help design future refinements to the study.
Google glass: The program will compare the usability and performance of a few approaches designed for authenticating users:

a. Use touch panel, enter an n-digit pins.

b. Use hand gesture for authentication.

c. Voice based recognition

The project steps will include running the study, processing the results and writing a report with the conclusions. Programming and signal processing experience are recommended for this project.

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Kevin Liang

Kevin

Lab: Bio-Molecular Engineering

Faculty: Dr. Jin Ryoun Kim

Mentor: Jason Candreva

Time: 12.45 pm

 

Abstract:

The aggregation of proteins in the brain is the direct cause of many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.  Specifically, the project focuses on modulation of protein aggregation, which is implicated in these diseases.  We look to investigate chemicals that affect the rate of this aggregation.  Results from these experiments can uncover mechanisms behind amyloid protein aggregation, leading to possible therapeutic treatments, as well as the discovery of new diagnostic tools.

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Rockella Caporale

Rockella

Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab

Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri

Mentor: Ross Anderson and Jayhwan Cheong

Time: 12.57 pm

 

Abstract:

This project entails a study of the thrust produced by a large bio-mimetic robotic fish. The student will design and construct flexible caudal fins (fish tails) out of silicone rubber based on various fish fin geometries. The student will mount the robotic fish on a low friction linear motion guide that is coupled to a load cell, and she will measure and analyze the thrust produced by the fish tail for each design.

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Olena Nazarenko and Raima Shafiq

Olena and Raima

Lab: Systems Prometrics Lab

Faculty: Dr. Christine Vogel

Mentor: Gustavo Monteiro Silva and Ana Galesic

Time: 1.09 pm

 

Abstract:

Proteins are biological molecules responsible for many functions inside every cellular organism. Our aim is to study the role of a family of proteins (ubiquitin enzymes), which are responsible for regulating the production of new proteins. In this project, the ARISE students will construct genetically modified proteins to investigate the function of the ubiquitin enzymes. Cells will be exposed to oxidative stress, an important condition to understand many diseases and the aging process at the molecular level.

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Jason Suwandi

Jason Suwandi

Lab: Applied Dynamics and Optimization Lab

Faculty: Dr. Joo H. Kim

Mentor: Carlotta Mummolo, Dustyn Roberts, Henry Clever and Seunghoon Jeong

Time: 1.29 pm

 

Abstract

In order to know the rate of energy consumption of a robotic system, it is necessary to sense the current.However, current sensing in manipulators with bidirectional DC motors is not trivial. The students will compare and contrast several different modules and document the advantages and disadvantages of all methods.

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Jeremy Eng and Troy Ramsarran

Troy Jeremy

Lab: Optical Sensing Lab

Faculty: Dr. Masoud Ghandehari

Mentor: Komal Anil Dixit

Time: 1.41 pm

 

Abstract

Building Thermal Efficiency: Synoptic IR imaging of building surface temperatures. To understand the thermal efficiency in cities using IR imaging, IR intensity is directly proportional to the surface temperatures. This allows us to find the surface temperatures of urban area. Also to study the heat flow between the surfaces/ buildings. The research is to develop analytic tools to understand the thermal surface temperature for the city. Studies solar heating of the built environment.

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