ARISE 2016 Colloquium Venue 1: RH-201

Elizaveta Atalig, Michael Klamkin

Elizaveta Atalig
Michael Klamkin
  • Lab: Applied Dynamics and Optimization Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Joo Hyun Kim
  • Mentors: Bryan Beider, Wenjie Chen
  • Time: 10:00 am – 10:20 am

Abstract

Knowing the State of Charge (SoC) of a battery at a given time is crucial to achieving optimal efficiency of dynamic robotic systems. To accurately estimate the SOC, among other states and battery cell parameters, the Kalman Filter can be applied in real time, using total current draw as the input and terminal voltage as the output, to smooth the incoming data by reducing the inherent noise in the system. By using a theoretical circuit, designed through multiple charge and discharge experiments to closely model internal lithium polymer cell chemistry, it is possible to calculate the voltage across various theoretical resistors and capacitors to determine the SoC and remaining states. Subsequently, Kalman filters can be applied to these voltage values against their corresponding predicted values to further smooth the data stream with little uncertainty. Battery state data in combination with equations that model various systems on the robot can factor into decision-making to determine what actions the robot should perform to reach peak efficiency.

Allison Lee

Allison Lee
  • Lab: Biomolecular Engineering Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Jin Ryoun Kim
  • Mentor: Edward Chau
  • Time: 10:20 am – 10:30 am

Abstract

An increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to the misfolding and aggregation of proteins. Parkinson’s Disease is a neurodegenerative diseases implicated by the aggregation of an amyloid protein known as alpha-synuclein. The project investigates chemical compounds that may modulate the rate of amyloid aggregation. Results from these experiments can uncover mechanisms behind amyloid protein aggregation, leading to possible therapeutic treatments, as well as the discovery of new diagnostic tools.

Caleb Smith-Salzberg

Caleb Smith-Salzberg
  • Lab: Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Shivendra Panwar
  • Mentor: Fraida Fund
  • Time: 10:30 am – 10:40 am

Abstract

Compared to other similarly economically developed countries, US households lag behind in speed and affordability of home broadband Internet service. Furthermore, a “digital divide” exists between the tens of millions of people in the US who lack access to affordable high-quality broadband service, and those developing new Internet services and protocols, who typically have fast Internet connections. As a result, many Internet services do not work as intended for a significant portion of the US population, because they have not been tested on a wide range of representative Internet connections. In this work, we will develop a tool for researchers to use when creating new Internet services and protocols on GENI, a nationwide suite of infrastructure used for “at scale” research in computer networks. Given a price range for Internet service, our tool will sample real measurements collected by the FCC of home broadband service, and provision research networks whose characteristics are representative of actual US households for that price range. Our work has the potential to help bridge the disconnect between developers and users of Internet services and protocols and thereby improve the experience of Internet users in the United States.

Janice Wang, Oishee Rahman

Janice Wang
Oishee Rahman
  • Lab: Biointerfacial Engineering Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Rastislav Levicky
  • Mentor: Ursula Koniges
  • Time: 10:40 am – 11:00 am

Abstract

Morpholinos are molecular analogues of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Morpholinos have promising applications in the development of genetic diagnostic tools, such as microarrays and electrochemical assays. Measurement of the concentration of morpholinos is commonly accomplished by determination of the amount of 260 nm light absorbed through a sample. An example of a device designed for such absorbance measurements is the NanoDrop, which requires manual pipetting of sample to device. Transfer of sample to the NanoDrop device can influence concentration measurements through adsorption losses on the pipette tip itself, thus lowering measured concentrations. The 2016 Levicky Lab ARISE students will investigate how pipette tip material and pipetting technique influence concentration measurements of morpholino oligonucleotides using the NanoDrop device.

Lillian Baker

Lilian Baker
  • Lab: Applied Micro-Bioengineering Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Weiqiang Chen
  • Mentor: Weiyi Qian
  • Time: 11:00 am – 11:10 am

Abstract

The “mechanophenotype” provides insight into cell’s properties except that from the biochemical properties. It is important to develop an understanding of the biomechanical attributes of cell to their function and response to stimuli. Cell stiffness is one of the most important biomechanical properties of cells that are essential to many mechanisms by which cells sense mechanical stimuli and transduce them into chemical signals that induce corresponding cellular response. To investigate intrinsic mechanosensitive properties of cells, we use a micropost array membrane (mPAM) with adjustable stiffness as substrate to explore cell’s response by culturing them on substrates with different stiffness. A robust computation scheme was developed and implemented for subcellular quantifications of cell stiffness.

Omowunmi Awelewa, Ilana Schachter

Omowunmi Awelewa
Ilana Schachter
  • Lab: Molecular Anthropology Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Todd Disotell
  • Mentors: Andrew Burrell, Laura Matthews
  • Time: 11:10 am – 11:30 am

Abstract

Every organism sheds DNA into the environment it inhabits. As DNA is a relatively hardy molecule, it persists over time in soil, water, and even the air. This “environmental” DNA, or eDNA, can be extracted from environmental samples and sequenced, allowing us to identify what organisms are present in specific habitats and in what numbers. ARISE students will join the Molecular Anthropology Laboratory at NYU and help us design projects such as using eDNA to track the expansion of invasive species like the emerald ash borer. Students will learn about eDNA, help obtain environmental samples, extract DNA from them, and help analyze the resulting DNA sequence data.

Paul Spezza

Paul Spezza
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  • Lab: Applied Micro-Bioengineering Lab
  • Faculty: Prof .Weiqiang Chen
  • Mentor: Xin Cui
  • Time: 11:30 am – 11:40 am

Abstract

Bone is highly vascularized for vital processes such as bone growth and remodeling. An essential process in bone repair is angiogenesis, the sprouting of endothelial cells, such that pre-existing blood vessels extend and invade into their microenvironment to form new blood vessels.To investigate bone repair under angiogenetic conditions, we have designed a bilayer microfluidic platform of 2 parallel 3-D channels in a well, derived from Collagen I rat-tail, to mimic in-vivo bone vasculature and the bone microenvironment. The aim is to elucidate the effects of these biochemical gradients on bone-related angiogenesis of bone repair

Rahma Ibrahim

Rahma Ibrahim
  • Lab: Biomolecular Engineering Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Jin Ryoun Kim
  • Mentor: Jason Candreva
  • Time: 11:40 am – 11:50 am

Abstract

The aggregation of proteins in the brain is the direct cause of many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Specifically, the project focuses on modulation of beta-amyloid aggregation, which is implicated in this disease. We look to investigate chemicals that affect the rate of this aggregation. Results from these experiments can uncover mechanisms behind amyloid protein aggregation, leading to possible therapeutic treatments, as well as the discovery of new diagnostic tools.

Amaya Munoz

Amaya Munoz
  • Lab: Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Shivendra Panwar
  • Mentor: Fraida Fund
  • Time: 11:50 am – 12:00 pm

Abstract

Many US households do not have high-speed Internet connections, especially in rural areas (that are not densely populated enough to attract investments from Internet service providers) and low-income areas (that lack affordable choices). Community networks – self-organized and decentralized networks, built and operated by its users for the users, often for free – are a potential solution. However, community networks grow organically from the “bottom up” as new participants connect themselves to the network, and so they may not have the speed and stability of traditional networks. In this work, we propose to gain a better understanding of community networks by developing a network topology for GENI, a nationwide suite of infrastructure used for “at scale” research in computer networks, that is representative of a community network. Our topology will draw on real data from active community networks, and will allow us and other researchers to study the performance of community networks in a controlled environment, potentially leading to insights that can improve the quality of service offered by these networks.