ARISE 2016 Colloquium Venue 3: RH-205

Naomi Ferguson

Naomi Fergusan
  • Lab: The Offensive Security, Incident Response and Internet Security Lab
  • Faculty:Prof. Nasir Memon
  • Mentors: Jay Koven , Kevin Gallagher
  • Time: 10:00 am – 10:10 am

Abstract

Finding connections in large communication datasets is a difficult challenge that requires an enormous amount of time and resources. Criminal investigators often have to navigate through hundreds of thousands of emails, text messages, posts and tens of thousands of unique users. In this project, we create a dynamic visual analytic tool to assist in these investigative efforts. The tool will focus on the content of the communications as well as the social network created but the senders and receivers.

Ajani Stewart

Ajani Stewart
  • Lab: The Offensive Security, Incident Response and Internet Security Lab
  • Faculty:Prof. Nasir Memon
  • Mentor: Hossein Siadati
  • Time: 10:10 am – 10:20 am

Abstract

Messaging applications provide point-to-point encryption for users. One of the challenges that users face is the task of comparing the exchanged cryptographic key to make sure that the two parties are using the same key, and no Man-in-the-Middle attack has happened during the key exchange phase. Telegram uses a visualization of the encryption key to make the work of comparison easier for users. However, it turned out that this is not easy for users to do the comparison in an accurate and timely manner due to the limitations of human visual perception. To understand this better, (1) we will implement a variation of key visualization in use by Telegram application, and (2) design and run an experiment to evaluate the users’ performance in distinguishing the differences of visualized key.

Cassandra Fleurelus

Cassandra Fleurelus
  • Lab: Protein Engineering & Molecular Design Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Jin Kim Montclare
  • Mentor: Andrew Olsen
  • Time: 10:20 am – 10:30 am

Abstract

Drug resistance in cancer remains a formidable hurdle to successful chemotherapy treatments and can unfortunately result in fatal consequences. Specific genes within the cancer genome are responsible for this drug resistance and therefore these genes have become therapeutic targets. Our research is focused on engineering proteins capable of delivering both short interfering RNA (siRNA) that silence the genes responsible for drug resistance and chemotherapeutic drugs that effectively kill cancer cells. Presently, we are characterizing a library of engineered proteins for their effective siRNA and drug binding ability for eventual testing in cancer cells.

Hartek Sabharwal

Hartek Sabharwal
  • Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri
  • Mentor: David Diner
  • Time: 10:30 am – 10:40 am

Abstract

Citizen science projects allow ordinary citizens to contribute to professional research projects by collecting and analyzing data. However, typical citizen science applications do not enable volunteers to directly coordinate with each other. A novel application has been developed to enable groups of volunteers to collaborate to monitor the environmental health of the Gowanus Canal by identifying objects in pictures taken from the surface of the canal. This research seeks to determine the influence of direct collaboration by identifying emergent leader-follower dynamics using information theoretic tools.

Sze Ting Lau

Kathy-Lau
  • Lab: Center for Urban Intelligent Transportation Systems Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Joseph Chow
  • Mentor: Susan Jia Xu
  • Time: 10:40 am – 10:50 am

Abstract

With increasing urbanization, megaregion growth, and emergence of privately operated transport services like Lyft and Uber, there is increasing need for strategic planning and collaboration between multiple operators and agencies. One recent example is the Uber partnership with the Paratransit service in Boston. Inter-operational strategic planning, however, is hampered by lack of tools to make system operating data easily available to decision-makers across the table. A new geographical information system (GIS) visualization tool will be studied to explore the potential for sharing route information in a privacy-preserving manner.

Doruntina Fida

Doruntina Fida
  • Lab: Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Fei Lei
  • Mentor: Zhongxuan Chi
  • Time: 10:50 am – 11:00 am

Abstract

It is widely known that errors in centromere formation lead to chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy, which further cause genetic disorders and tumorigenesis. The aim of this project is to determine the regulation of centromere formation in S. pombe. Identified by genome-wide screening for CENP-Acnp mis-localization in S. pombe, two mutant strains show significant abnormalities of centromere structures. The methods will include phenotypic characterization of mutant strains by visual screening, phenotypic determination of centromere de-cluster or multiple foci formation and biochemical characterization of novel proteins involved in centromere regulation.

Malaq Alzoubeir

Malaq Alzoubeir
  • Lab: Center for Urban Intelligent Transportation Systems Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Joseph Chow
  • Mentor: Susan Jia Xu
  • Time: 11:00 am – 11:10 am

Abstract

In many transit systems around the world (including the NYC MTA), there is no tracking system for the paths that people take. For example, a person entering the Jay St. Metro Tech station and emerging at Times Square could have gone via a number of different paths. As a result, there is problem of real time assessment of ridership levels on different trains in the system at any given time. Some studies have used automated fare payment data from smart cards to infer such information; the London Tube is one example. As the NYC MTA prepares to upgrade its fare payment system to smart cards and mobile devices over the next three years, such an information system will be necessary. A study of the inference methodology and initial proof of concept for NYC MTA will be designed.

Dankevin Ynoa, Christina Deng

Dankevin Ynoa
 Christina Deng
  • Lab: Soil Mechanics Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Magued Iskander
  • Mentor: Matteo Casacci
  • Time: 11:10 am – 11:30 am

Abstract

One of the challenges of experimental work in geotechnical engineering is to accurately simulate subsurface conditions in a controlled environment in the lab. The Geotechnology Research Group at the Department of Civil & Urban Engineering, lead by Dr. Magued Iskander, has designed and constructed a plane strain calibration chamber that can be used to perform pile jacking and driving in order to study and compare the soil particle kinematics during the installation processes. ARISE students will get hands-on experience and learn from all steps involved in this experiment, from sample preparation to post-experiment computational analysis.

Jamie Monroy Rojas

Jamie Monroy Rojas
  • Lab: Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Fei Lei
  • Mentor: Zhongxuan Chi
  • Time: 11:30 am – 11:40 am

Abstract

Proper chromosome segregation is essential to maintain genomic stability and cell viability. The centromere is the point of attachment of the chromosomes to the spindle skeleton during mitosis so it function is fundamental for chromosome segregation. Most of the organisms have monocentric chromosomes i.e. they have a single centromere per chromosome, whereas some species have evolved holocentric chromosomes, so they have multiple points of attachment along their chromosomes. In monocentric chromosomes, the centromere is epigenetically defined by the presence of the histone protein CENP-A. However, little is known about the function and determination of centromeres in species with holocentric chromosomes. The goal of this study is to genetically engineer fission yeast, which has monocentric chromosomes, to express a CENP-A protein coming from an organism with holocentric chromosomes (the nematode C. elegans). This would help us to understand how mono and holo-centromeres are established, the role of CENP-A and the consequences for cell division.

Nina Chen

Nina Chen
  • Lab: Protein Engineering and Molecular Design Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Jin Kim Montclare
  • Mentor: Andrew Olsen
  • Time: 11:40 am – 11:50 am

Abstract

Organophosphates (OPs) are a class of compounds that comprise many commercial pesticides and military-grade nerve gas agents. OPs inactivate acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme in the nervous system, by binding to their active sites, which leads to accumulation of acetylcholine and subsequent hyper-stimulation of nerve synapses. It has been demonstrated that phosphotriesterase (PTE) enzymes are capable of neutralizing these chemicals. In this project we will synthesize and characterize new PTE enzymes that can protect human bodies and the environment from OPs.

Cameron Jacobson

Cameron Jacobson and Muhammad Jalalisendi
  • Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab
  • Faculty: Prof. Maurizio Porfiri
  • Mentor: Mohammad Jalalisendi
  • Time: 11:50 am – 12:00 pm

Abstract

Marine vessels should endure impact loads from water-ice mixtures in arctic environments. Global warming is posing new scientific challenges on the mechanics of marine structures by rapidly changing the polar landscape such that this area of research is becoming more important. The aim of this project is to establish an experimental scheme to study ice-induced loading during water entry of marine vessels. Specifically, to obtain a fundamental understanding of the physics of the problem experiments are performed by releasing neutrally buoyant solid bodies in the fluid to be able to comprehend the effect of a solid phase during water entry.