Venue 3: RH 205

Mariya Tasnim, Kiana Jackson

Mariya Tasnim
Kiana Jackson
  • Lab: Protein Engineering and Molecular Design Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Jin Montclare
  • Mentor: Andrew Olsen
  • Time: 10:00 am – 10:14 am

Abstract:

Organophosphates (OPs) are a class of compounds that comprise many commercial pesticides and military-grade nerve gas agents. OPs inactivate acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme in the nervous system, by binding to their active sites, which leads to accumulation of acetylcholine and subsequent hyper-stimulation of nerve synapses. It has been demonstrated that phosphotriesterase (PTE) enzymes are capable of neutralizing these chemicals. In this project we will synthesize and characterize new PTE enzymes that can protect human bodies from OPs.

Manuel Gomez

Manuel Gomez
  • Lab: Information Systems & Internet Security Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Nasir Memon
  • Mentor: Jay Koven, Kevin Gallagher, Thanos Papadopoulos
  • Time: 10:20 am -10:27 am

Abstract:

Source camera attribution is a useful tool in digital forensics, however, it raises many privacy concerns. For example, an oppressive government with access to a collection of digital photographs from various cameras may be able to identify confidential informants to journalists. In order to defend against this, one can use seam carving to anonymize the source of the photos. Our team will develop a web service that allows users to anonymize their photos by using the seam carving approach, while simultaneously learning how to seam carve better.

Pedro Velazquez

Pedro Velazquez
  • Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri
  • Mentor: Filippo Cellini
  • Time: 10:33 am – 10:40 am

Abstract:

Optical measurements for mechanical characterization of elastomers: Additive manufacturing and 3D printing are increasingly integrated in industrial manufacturing practice, as well as in academic research and education. The Dynamical System Laboratory (DSL) is currently developing a novel platform for 3D printing of elastomers, with the goal of integrating this technology in ongoing robotics research projects. This project will investigate the mechanical response of elastomeric materials using digital image correlation, a classical experimental technique for measuring deformations of a structure using a video camera. This study aims to contribute to the development of 3D printing technologies for elastomeric materials by enabling accurate analysis of the mechanical deformations of printed parts.

Dehaan Rehman

Dehaan Rehman
  • Lab: Information Systems & Internet Security Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Nasir Memon
  • Mentor: Thanos Papadopoulos
  • Time: 10:46 am – 10:53 am

Abstract:

In today’s world our lives depend on technology; this is obvious from the amount and the importance of the information that we store in our smartphones, laptops and more. Our goals are first to identify the real everyday life security needs in our society, and then to propose and evaluate a graphical password scheme that could cover these needs.

Josephine Soddano

Josephine Soddano
  • Lab: Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Fei Li
  • Mentor: Dr. Jinpu Yang
  • Time: 10:59 am – 11:06 am

Abstract:

The centromere is the anchor point for kinetochore attachment in a cell. It is essential for proper chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis, however the mechanisms specifying centromere identity are largely unclear. The structure of the Fission Yeast centromere is highly conserved, so is similar to that in human cells. Fission Yeast has a regional centromere that is epigenetically defined by histone variant CENPA. This study utilizes Fission Yeast as a model system to uncover novel factors regulating centromere identity.

Melanie Watson

Melanie Watson
  • Lab: Information Systems and Internet Security Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Nasir Memon
  • Mentor: Jay Koven, Kevin Gallagher, Thanos Papadopoulos
  • Time: 11:12 am – 11:19 am

Abstract:

The forensic analysis of email and other unstructured data poses many challenges to an investigator. Many pieces of the puzzle are not clearly visible when reading text of the email body. One such piece of information is contained in the IP addresses found in emails and other computer files. Our team will develop a visual analytic presentation of global IP address information that will help the forensic investigators understand the locations found and the dataset and the flow of emails between the locations.

Ayinde Eustache

Ayinde Eustache
  • Lab: Soil Mechanics Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Magued Iskander
  • Mentor: Camilo Daza
  • Time: 11:25 am – 11:32 am

Abstract:

This project studies the stress-strain response of Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP) as a suitable option for replacing piles made of conventional construction materials. Conventional materials such as concrete, timber and steel, can be significantly deteriorated when they are in contact with water or with other aggressive environments. To achieve this objective, FRP pile samples will be subjected to a comprehensive set of quasi-static and high strain rate (HSR) compression tests. The effect of the spatial distribution of the samples in the mechanical response of the core FRP material will be also investigated to account for the isotropy of the pile.

Kenneth Martinez

Kenneth Martinez
  • Lab: Molecular and Cellular Biology Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Fei Li
  • Mentor: Dr. Haijin He
  • Time: 11:38 am – 11:45 am

Abstract:

In fission yeast, DNA repeats are present in the heterochromatin regions flanking centromeres. We recently discovered that those repeats, although quite similar in sequence, behave differently based on their individual positions: we are initiating a large scale screening for mutants that affect this using a deletion library containing thousands of single gene deletions. This project will involve construction of required fission yeast strains, small scale crossing of strains, and data analysis.

Vicente Gomez

Vicente Gomez
  • Lab: Soil Mechanics
  • Faculty: Dr. Magued Iskander
  • Mentor: Zhibo (Chris) Chen, Sophia Mercurio
  • Time: 11:51 am – 11:58 am

Abstract:

This research studies some of the subsurface phenomena that occur when foundations are constructed, such as particle movement on the macro-, meso-, and micro-scales. These effects of pile installation methods can vary based on surrounding soils and structures. Therefore, this research compares the effects that occur during two installation methods, driving and jacking, as well as in different soil profiles.

Pranav Garg

Pranav Garg
  • Lab: Dynamical Systems Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Maurizio Porfiri
  • Mentor: Mohammad Jalalisendi
  • Time: 12:04 pm – 12:11 pm

Abstract:

Understanding the fluid-structure interaction during water entry of solid bodies is an important design scenario in naval hydrodynamics. Often, several complicating factors arise in water entry, such as air cushioning, cavitation, hydroelasticity, and asymmetric or oblique impacts. In particular, air cushioning is responsible for the reduction of the hydrodynamic loading on a blunt body impacting into a calm water surface. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, experiments are performed on blunt bodies such as flat-bottom body and cylinder. The impact velocity is varied and high speed imaging is utilized to quantify the air entrapment during water entry. Specifically, an in-house digital image processing technique is leveraged to identify the regions of air trapped inside the fluid. In addition, particle image velocimetry is used to understand the effect of air cushioning on the flow physics and hydrodynamic loading.