Venue 1: RH-201

Amanda Zong, Jun Hui Lin

Amanda Zong, Jun Hui Lin
Amanda Zong, Jun Hui Lin
  • Lab: Applied Dynamics and Optimization Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Joo H. Kim
  • Mentor: Henry M. Clever, Carlotta Mummolo, William Peng
  • Time: 10:00 am – 10:14 am

Abstract:

Human movement tends to maximize stability and energy efficiency. Similarly, robotic systems can be designed to decrease energy usage and increase performance. A 2 degree-of-freedom robotic arm has been developed to measure energy expenditure of various trajectories. Through Ohm’s law, we will calculate power from voltage and current and apply it to static and dynamic robotic arm testing. Using these data, we can solve for robotic energy expenditure constants using a least-squares algorithm and optimize robotic efficiency.

Kendra Mahabir

Kendra Mahabir
  • Lab: Biomolecular Engineering Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Jin Ryoun Kim
  • Mentor: Vandan Shah
  • Time: 10:20 am – 10:27 am

Abstract:

Bio-catalytic proteins, enzymes, have many potential industrial applications. Unfortunately, successful applications of enzymes are frequently limited by their instability and tendency to aggregate. The objective of this research is to explore candidate small molecules to increase the stability of enzymes. The effects of these small molecules on enzyme stability will be carefully evaluated using various experimental means. The study will help us to design protein solutions for increased stability or reduced aggregation.

Benjamin Spiegel

Benjamin Spiegel
  • Lab: CATT (Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications)
  • Faculty: Dr. Shivendra Panwar
  • Mentor: Fraida Fund
  • Time: 10:32 am – 10:39 am

Abstract:

Net Neutrality is the concept that content providers should be on equal footing when serving their content. The current Net Neutrality regulations restrict paid agreements between content providers and internet service providers (ISPs) but neglect the paid agreements between ISPs. These unrestricted agreements between ISPs have been known to cause major problems for internet consumers. Through experimentation we will measure the impact of these agreements on the quality of service (QOS) of internet consumers. The results may provide insight to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in reference to future Net Neutrality regulations.

Wuraola Omotosho, Menjin Kuk

Wuraola Omotosho
Menjin Kuk
  • Lab: Applied Micro-Bioengineering Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Weiqiang Chen
  • Mentor: Xiaoyu Xu, Caroline Kopfler
  • Time: 10:45 am – 10:59 am

Abstract:

Understanding mechanotransduction (the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into electro-chemical activity) at the cellular level gives insight to the mechanisms involved in initiating and controlling the molecular signaling pathways. Periosteal cells are osteoprogenitor cells from the periosteum that differentiate into osteoblasts, giving rise to bone tissue and will have great application in bone grafts, osseo-integration of prosthetics, and treatment of osteoporosis, etc. This project examines the mechanical responsivity and sensitivity of primary periosteal cells and how mechanical stimulation promotes periosteal differentiation toward osteoblasts by using acoustic tweezers for cell regulation.

Michele-lane Detouche, Samantha Paucar

Michele-lane Detouche, Samantha Paucar
Michele-lane Detouche, Samantha Paucar
  • Lab: Bio-Interfacial Engineering and Diagnostics Group
  • Faculty: Dr. Rastislav Levicky
  • Mentor: Ursula Koniges
  • Time: 11:05 am – 11:19 am

Abstract:

Short sequences of single stranded DNA & RNA, known as oligonucleotides, are important to biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic applications. Oligonucleotide concentrations in solution are commonly measured by the absorbance of light at 260 nanometers. When using the NanoDrop—a device that records the amount of 260 nm light absorbed through a sample—unusual absorbance patterns that seem dependent on pipette tip material & pipetting protocol have been observed. This summer, the ARISE students in the Biointerfacial Engineering Lab will investigate how pipette tip material and pipetting technique influence concentration measurements of oligonucleotides through the NanoDrop device.

Sofia Thompson

Sofia Thompson
  • Lab: Applied Dynamics and Optimization Lab (ADOL)
  • Faculty: Dr. Joo H. Kim
  • Mentor: Carlotta Mummolo
  • Time: 11:25 am – 11:32 am

Abstract:

In order to understand how bipeds, such as humans and humanoids, balance, determining the center of mass position and velocity is fundamental. Our task is to develop an algorithm in MATLAB that, given basic inputs such as height, weight and foot size, can generate an approximation for the coordinates of the center of mass that is as accurate as possible. Eventually, we will implement this algorithm into a software for the X-Box Kinect and test it on human subjects based on data captured by the Kinect.

Malik Bolden

Malik Bolden
  • Lab: Applied Micro-Bioengineering Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Weiqiang Chen
  • Mentor: Weiyi Qian
  • Time: 11:38 am – 11:45 am

Abstract:

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that escape from primary or metastatic lesions and enter into circulation, carrying significant information of cancer progression and metastasis. Capture of CTCs from a patient’s peripheral bloodstream and accessing characterization of these cells hold great significance for the detection, characterization and treatment of cancers. This project involves the capture of CTCs from blood using a microfluidc chip by taking advantage of the immunoaffinity of cells.

Raisa Alam

Raisa Alam
  • Lab: Biomolecular Engineering Lab
  • Faculty: Dr. Jin Ryoun Kim
  • Mentor: Jason Candreva
  • Time: 11:51 am – 11:58 am

Abstract:

The aggregation of proteins in the brain is the direct cause of many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Specifically, the project focuses on modulation of protein aggregation, which is implicated in these diseases. We look to investigate chemicals that affect the rate of this aggregation. Results from these experiments can uncover mechanisms behind amyloid protein aggregation, leading to possible therapeutic treatments, as well as the discovery of new diagnostic tools.

Dolly Devashryee

Dolly Devashryee
  • Lab: Center for Advanced Technology in Telecommunications (CATT)
  • Faculty: Dr. Shivendra Panwar
  • Mentor: Fraida Fund
  • Time: 12:04 pm – 12:11 pm

Abstract:

Today’s networks lack the ability to respond gracefully to failure. The loss of network service impacts people deeply because of how reliant they are on constantly being connected. We will show how to design network recovery paths in the event of a disaster within a metro area. Our solution can help service providers adapt after problems like hurricanes, earthquakes, widespread power outages, and terrorist attacks.