Internal Speakers

Thief: A Qualitative Examination of Movie Piracy Behaviors in American and Jamaican Women and Their Impact

  • Thursday, December 9, 2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 433, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Kerry-Ann White

Abstract

The piracy of copyrighted movies in the digital disc format at any stage of the motion picture industry’s value chain without permission of the copyright holders is an ongoing problem that is prevalent and adversely impacts industry revenues. In this flat world, information and materials are being disseminated at an alarming rate. Drawing on the Theory of Planned Behavior, and expanding upon my previous conference publication, I qualitatively examine the factors impacting movie piracy behaviors American and Jamaican female respondents between 17 and 70 years of age. I discuss differences across groups and examine the underlying rationale for piracy behaviors. In order to move closer to mitigating some of the damages caused by movie piracy, it is recommended that the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) should find ways to communicate with each group of women through effective marketing, education and enforcement of its piracy policies and penalties and with each country to affirm their stance on piracy. back to top

Hindi NonVisual Desktop Access

  • Thursday, December 2, 2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 433, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Joyojeet Pal, Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Technology Management
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering

Authors

Kiran Bartakke, Yeswanth Gogineni, Joyojeet Pal, Kunjan Sanghavi, Anjali Vartak, Avinash Vutukuri, Vrutti Vyas

Abstract

Language support for screen readers is a major challenge in the area of accessible assistive technology for vision-impaired computer users from the developing world. In this research, we demonstrate an implementation of mechanical/robotic voice Hindi language text-to-speech for the NVDA screen reader. We discuss the challenges making screen readers accessible to users of languages not currently represented, and specifically consider the problems of mechanical voice systems in intelligible audio output. To this end, we present the results of a small study of our system with native and non-native Hindi speakers. In conclusion, we make the case for why the larger issues of developing quality screen readers presents a diverse set of challenges that require attention from researchers familiar with both the technological and social aspects of design for new technology adopters. back to top

Trust Antecedents for Interaction Designs in Online Social Networks: A Look at Facebook Places

  • Thursday, November 11, 2010 - 5:00pm - 6:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 433, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Paul Russo

Abstract

My approach considers the decision to trust in social network interactions as a function of 5 antecedents (grounded psychological and sociological roots). The network is both an object (do we believe that others in the network are trustworthy) and source of trust (does word-of-mouth matter and do particular types of referrers provide particular types of referrals/under what environmental conditions e.g risk or high emotion). back to top

Service Design Capability: Towards a Service-based View of the Firm

  • Thursday, October 21, 2010 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 433, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Bojan Angelov

Abstract

Given the lack of service-specific studies of organizational capabilities and competitive advantage, and coupled with the issues of conceptualizing service and operationalizing service innovation, this study takes an exploratory approach and examines how service firms themselves think of their service offerings and the capabilities underlying their design and service provision. As such, I aimed at understanding the distinctiveness of service capabilities related to the design of (and in) service. My research focus was primarily on knowledge-intensive services because of their unique position in value constellations and innovation in general. This exploratory enquiry draws on data from thirty-five interviews of service firms that are analyzed and told as three interrelated “stories” centered around the conceptualization of service, service capabilities, and service design (as seen by the interviewed service firms). The concept of service was expanded upon by identifying its constituting service elements (its building blocks) and the overarching service capabilities that are related to- and help instantiate them. In addition, by adopting a capabilities perspective, I introduce and develop the concept of service design capability (SDC). Service design, rooted in the capabilities view of service and at the most abstract level, helps firms identify “what they can do” for their clients. Therefore, I characterize service as the act rendered by the capabilities set to be part of the provider-client relationship. I further describe service design as the process of making the service tangible by translating organizational capabilities that underlie the instantiation of service elements (and their configuration) into- and according to the client’s context. Consequently, SDC represents the overall organizational capacity for service design (the process of creating a service). SDC was conceptualized as affording the translation of organizational capabilities by embedding them into a service relationship and rendering them tangible for the client. Using SDC as a research vehicle in studying the competitive advantage of service firms, I hint towards a service-based view of the firm by focusing on “service as capabilities in-use.” This study, and in particular the conceptualization of SDC, contribute to both research and practice by bringing conceptual clarity and increasing our understanding of service design. back to top

Scientists@home (and in the Back Yard): Understanding the Motivations of Digital Citizen Science Volunteers

  • Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 6:00pm - 7:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 401, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Oded Nov

Abstract

Internet-based citizen science is a low-cost way to strengthen the scientific infrastructure and engage members of the public in science. It is based on two pillars: technological (developing computer systems to manage large amounts of distributed resources) and motivational (attracting and retaining people who would be willing to contribute their computing resources, skills, time, and effort to a scientific cause). While the technological pillar was widely studied, the motivational dimension received little attention to date. We surveyed 4376 volunteers in three citizen science projects, of varying task granularity levels. We found that collective and intrinsic motives are the most salient motivational factors, whereas reward motives seem to be less relevant to citizen scientists. In addition, we found that most motivational factors are susceptible to differences in the contribution’s task granularity. Future digital citizen science projects need to create dynamic contribution environments that allow volunteers to start contributing at lower-level granularity tasks, and gradually progress to more demanding tasks and responsibilities. back to top

How “Social” Are Social Networking Sites? A Longitudinal Study of Social Capital Formation Offline and Online Among Facebook Users

  • Thursday, September 30, 2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 401, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Petter Bae Brandtzæg

Authors

Petter Bae Brandtzæg and Oded Nov

Abstract

How do social networking sites (SNS) affect social capital offline and online? The increasing popularity of SNS such as Facebook implies a significant change to our social interaction. Thus, it is frequently questioned how “social” SNSs really are. In this longitudinal study we examine the relationship between the use of Facebook and interpersonal interaction, as well as the relationship between Facebook use and users’ online and offline social networks. The findings of a three year (2008-2009-2010) study of online users in Norway suggest that (a) SNS use is negatively associated with face-to-face interaction with close friends; (b) a positive correlation exists between the use of SNS and bridging capital, both offline and online, and (c) SNS use is positively related to face-to-face family interaction, but less and less so. Results and design implications are discussed. back to top

A Case for Low-cost Assistive Technology in the Developing World

  • Thursday, September 23, 2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 400, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Joyojeet Pal, Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Technology Management
NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering

Abstract

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN-CRPD) has committed a number of states throughout the world to the goal of providing Assistive Technologies (AT) to citizens with visual impairments towards the goal of greater social and economic inclusion. The functional potential of AT in social inclusion is however greatly disadvantaged by the prohibitively high cost. The current market for most AT is largely restricted to state of the art, expensive AT designed for use by people with visual impairments in the industrialized world. In addition to cost, the lack of language support for users in the developing world and the shortage of open source tools for developers to build on existing AT hampers the creation of new tools. The community of researchers working on issues around technology and social inclusion has been surprisingly silent on issues of disability, the goal of this presentation is to create an awareness of the AT issues that need attention. In building an early agenda, we identify three areas of critical importance in communication that need low-cost development – screen readers, refreshable Braille displays, and cellular phone accessibility tools. back to top

The Role of Writing in Knowledge Sharing and Development: Evidence From Letters

  • Thursday, September 16, 2010 - 1:00pm - 2:00pm
  • Dibner Building, LC 400, Five MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, NY

Speaker

Anne-Laure Fayard

Authors

Anne-Laure Fayard and Anca Metiu, ESSEC

Abstract

In this paper, we elaborate on the literacy theories’ premise that writing is a fundamental communication modality and investigate the central role played by written communication in knowledge sharing and development. Through an analysis of historical correspondences in two distributed settings – a large multinational company and a scientific collaboration – we identify four mechanisms – objectifying, addressing, reflecting and specifying – through which writing enables the development of an organizational memory and of new knowledge. These mechanisms are critical to revitalizing scholars’ conception of the role of writing in knowledge sharing and creation, and provide a constructive way of reconciling conflicting claims and findings regarding the capabilities of written forms of communication in conveying and developing rich, complex, nuanced knowledge. They also offer productive ways for analyzing current communicative practices and potential implications for knowledge sharing and development.

Keywords: writing; knowledge sharing; knowledge development; organizational communication; literacy theory; discourse analysis; letters. back to top